American Civil War: Interpreting Conflict through Primary Documents, 1st Edition

  • Justin D. Murphy
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1440856311
  • ISBN-13: 9781440856310
  • DDC: 973.7
  • 798 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2019 | Published/Released October 2019
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2019

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

This meticulously curated collection of primary source documents covers every aspect of the American Civil War, from its origins to its bloody engagements, all the way through the Reconstruction period. With approximately 300 primary sources, this comprehensive set includes orders and reports of significant battles, political debates and speeches, legislation, court cases, and literary works from the Civil War era. The documents provide insight into the thinking of all participants, drawing upon a vast range of sources that offer both a Northern and Southern perspective. The book gives equal treatment to Eastern and Western Theaters and Union and Confederate sources, and sources are presented chronologically so readers can compare and contrast documents as key events unfold. Each primary source begins with an introduction that sets the document in its proper context and concludes with an analysis of the document that will help students to understand the document's significance.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
List of Documents.
Introduction.
American Civil War Timeline.
Before the War.
1: Fugitive Slave Acts (1793, 1850).
2: Missouri Compromise (March 6, 1820) [Excerpts].
3: Daniel Webster's Second Reply to Robert Y. Hayne (January 26–27, 1830) [Excerpts].
4: Wilmot Proviso (August 8, 1846).
5: Free Soil Party Platform (June 22, 1848).
6: Daniel Webster: Address Before Congress (March 7, 1850) [Excerpts].
7: Resolves of the Southern Convention at Nashville (June 10–11, 1850) [Excerpts].
8: Harriet Beecher Stowe: Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) [Excerpts].
9: Kansas-Nebraska Act (May 30, 1854) [Excerpts].
10: Charles Sumner: Speech to the U.S. Senate (May 19, 1856) [Excerpts].
11: Dred Scott v. Sandford, 60 U.S. 393 (1857) [Excerpts].
12: Lecompton Constitution (September 1857) [Excerpts].
13: James H. Hammond: Speech to the Senate (March 4, 1858) [Excerpts].
14: Abraham Lincoln: House Divided Speech (June 16, 1858).
15: Stephen A. Douglas: Freeport Doctrine (August 27, 1858).
16: John Brown: Final Address to the Court (November 2, 1859).
17: Abraham Lincoln: Speech at Cooper Union (February 27, 1860) [Excerpts].
18: Constitutional Union Party Platform (May 9, 1860).
19: Republican Party Platform of 1860 (May 17, 1860).
20: Daniel Decatur Emmett: “Dixie” (1860).
21: The Crittenden Compromise (December 18, 1860).
22: South Carolina Ordinance of Secession (December 20, 1860).
23: Jefferson Davis: Farewell Address to U.S. Senate (January 21, 1861).
24: Jefferson Davis: Inaugural Address (February 18, 1861).
25: Abraham Lincoln: First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1861).
1861.
26: Editorial: “The Declaration of War,” Richmond Enquirer (March 5, 1861).
27: Confederate Constitution (March 11, 1861) [Excerpts].
28: Opinions Written By Cabinet Members on the Question of Sending An Expedition to Relieve Fort Sumter (March 29, 1861).
29: William H. Seward and Abraham Lincoln: Correspondence on Direction of Federal Policy (April 1, 1861).
30: Pierre Gustave Toutant-Beauregard and Robert Anderson: Correspondence on Fort Sumter (April 11–12, 1861).
31: Abraham Lincoln: Proclamation Calling Militia Into National Service (April 15, 1861).
32: Roger Jones: Union Correspondence Relating to Harpers Ferry (April 18–20, 1861).
33: Abraham Lincoln: Proclamation Declaring a Blockade of Southern Ports (April 19, 1861).
34: Robert E. Lee: Resignation From U.S. Army (April 20, 1861).
35: Abraham Lincoln: Letter to Winfield Scott Authorizing Suppression of Maryland If Necessary (April 25, 1861).
36: Abraham Lincoln: Orders Suspending Habeas Corpus (1861–1862).
37: Jefferson Davis: Response to Lincoln's Proclamation Calling out the Militia (April 29, 1861).
38: Winfield Scott: Letter to George B. Mcclellan on the “Anaconda” Plan (May 3, 1861).
39: Frank J. Marshall: Report to Jefferson Davis (May 20, 1861).
40: Ex Parte Merryman, 17 F. Cas. 144 (1861) [Excerpts].
41: Benjamin F. Butler and Simon Cameron: Correspondence on Treatment of Fugitive Slaves (1861).
42: Joseph Henry: Letter to Simon Cameron Regarding Lowe's Balloon (June 21, 1861).
43: Abraham Lincoln: Address to Congress (July 4, 1861) [Excerpts].
44: Jefferson Davis: Letter to Abraham Lincoln Regarding the Crew of the Savannah (July 6, 1861).
45: Edward Porter Alexander: Memoir Excerpt about the First Battle of Bull Run (July 21, 1861).
46: Irvin Mcdowell: Reports on the First Battle of Bull Run (July 21–22, 1861).
47: George B. Mcclellan: Letter to His Wife (July 27, 1861) [Excerpts].
48: Rose Greenhow: Intelligence Reports (July 31–August 9, 1861) [Excerpts].
49: Conspiracies Act of 1861, Confiscation Act of 1861, and Confiscation Act of 1862.
50: Benjamin Mcculloch: Proclamation to the People of Missouri (August 15, 1861).
51: Proceedings of an Assembly of the Cherokee People (August 21, 1861).
52: John C. Frémont: Proclamation of Martial Law in Missouri (August 30, 1861).
53: Joseph E. Johnston and Jefferson Davis: Correspondence on Rank (September 12 And 14, 1861).
54: Henry S. Olcott: Memoir Excerpt, “The War's Carnival of Fraud” and the Poem “Song of the Shoddy” (September 21, 1861).
55: George D. Prentice: Letter to Abraham Lincoln on Behalf of Individuals Arrested after the Suspension of Habeas Corpus (September 24, 1861).
56: Louis M. Goldsborough: Letter to Gideon Welles about the CSS Virginia (October 17, 1861).
57: Julia Ward Howe: “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” (1861).
58: Harry Mccarthy: “The Bonnie Blue Flag” (1861).
1862.
59: Charles Francis Adams: Letter to William H. Seward Regarding the Trent Affair (January 10, 1862).
60: Douglas H. Cooper: Report on Operations in Indian Territory (January 20, 1862) [Excerpts].
61: Ulysses S. Grant: Demand for Surrender of Fort Donelson (February 16, 1862).
62: Legal Tender Act (February 25, 1862) [Excerpts] Introduction.
63: Union and Confederate Correspondence Regarding the Monitor Versus the Virginia (March–April 1862).
64: Jefferson Davis: Letter to the House of Representatives on Measures Against Ironclads (March 25, 1862).
65: Earl Van Dorn: Report on Defeat at Pea Ridge (March 27, 1862).
66: Union and Confederate Reports on the Battle of Glorieta Pass (March 30, 1862).
67: Samuel R. Curtis: Report on Battle of Pea Ridge (April 1, 1862) [Excerpts].
68: Albert Sidney Johnston and Jefferson Davis: Correspondence Before the Battle of Shiloh (April 3 And 4, 1862).
69: Albert Sidney Johnston: Proclamation before the Battle of Shiloh (April 3, 1862).
70: Elisha Stockwell: Memoir Excerpt about the Battle of Shiloh (1862).
71: Henry Villard: Reporter's account of the Battle of Shiloh (1862).
72: George B. Mcclellan and Abraham Lincoln: Correspondence During the Peninsular Campaign (April 7 And 9, 1862).
73: Braxton Bragg: Message to Pierre Gustave Toutant-Beauregard after the Battle of Shiloh (April 8, 1862).
74: Jefferson Davis: Proclamation Suspending Habeas Corpus (April 8, 1862).
75: Abolition of Slavery in the District of Columbia (April 16, 1862) [Excerpts].
76: Conscription Acts (April 16, 1862, and March 3, 1863) Introduction.
77: John R. Bartlett : Memoir Excerpt on the Passage of Fort Jackson and Fort St. Philip (1884).
78: Mary Loughborough: Letter about Visiting Casualties of the Battle of Shiloh (May 1, 1862).
79: Benjamin F. Butler: Proclamation to the Women of New Orleans (May 15, 1862).
80: Homestead Act (May 20, 1862) [Excerpts] Introduction.
81: Henry Kyd Douglas: Memoir Excerpt about Service with Stonewall Jackson (May 1862).
82: Appointment of Robert E. Lee as Commander of the Army of Northern Virginia (June 1–2, 1862).
83: Charles Henry Davis: Report on Capture and Occupation of Memphis (June 6–8, 1862).
84: Pierre Gustave Toutant-Beauregard: Report on Corinth Campaign (June 13, 1862).
85: Edwin M. Stanton: General Orders No. 72, on Paroled Prisoners (June 28, 1862).
86: Morrill Land Grant Act (July 2, 1862).
87: George B. Mcclellan: Letter to Abraham Lincoln about War Aims (July 7, 1862).
88: Robert E. Lee: Congratulatory Orders Issued after the Seven Days Battles (July 7, 1862).
89: John Pope: Proclamation to His Troops (July 14, 1862).
90: Militia Act of 1862 (July 17, 1862).
91: George Root: “the Battle Cry of Freedom” (July 1862).
92: Dix-Hill Cartel on Prisoner Exchanges (July 22, 1862).
93: Sarah Morgan: Diary Entry about the Destruction of the Arkansas (August 6, 1862).
94: Abraham Lincoln: Address on Colonization to a Deputation of Colored Men (August 14, 1862).
95: Little Crow: Speech Preceding the Minnesota Sioux Uprising (August 18, 1862).
96: Abraham Lincoln: Letter to Horace Greeley (August 22, 1862).
97: Benjamin F. Butler: General Orders, No. 63 (August 22, 1862) [Excerpts].
98: William B. Taliaferro: Memoir Excerpt from “Jackson's Raid Around Pope” (1884).
99: Robert E. Lee: Proclamation to the People of Maryland (September 8, 1862).
100: Confederate and Union Correspondence Prior to Antietam (September 9 And 13, 1862).
101: Josiah Gorgas: Diary Entry about Southern Optimism (September 14, 1862).
102: George Smalley: Union Newspaper Report about the Battle of Antietam (September 20, 1862).
103: Alpheus S. Williams: Letter about the Battle of Antietam (September 22, 1862).
104: Abraham Lincoln: Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation (September 22, 1862); Emancipation Proclamation (January 1, 1863).
105: Braxton Bragg: Report on Battle of Perryville (October 12, 1862).
106: George B. Mcclellan: Report on the Battle of Antietam (October 15, 1862) [Excerpts].
107: Abraham Lincoln and George B. Mcclellan: Correspondence After Antietam (October 25, 1862).
108: Newspaper Account of the Great Gainesville Hanging of 1862 (December 9, 1862).
109: Ulysses S. Grant: General Orders No. 11 on the Expulsion of Jews (December 17, 1862).
110: Henry L. Abbott: Letter about the First Battle of Fredericksburg (December 17, 1862).