American History through Its Greatest Speeches: A Documentary History of the United States, 1st Edition

  • Jolyon Girard
  • Darryl Mace
  • Courtney Smith
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 161069970X
  • ISBN-13: 9781610699709
  • DDC: 815.008
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 1360 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2016 | Published/Released August 2017
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2016

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

This book presents hundreds of the most important speeches in United States history, and in almost every example, the complete, unedited version of those speeches is presented. The speeches are presented in four chronological chapters covering the years from 1900 to 2015. Each speech is prefaced by a headnote that provides essential background information and specific details about the speech. This three-volume set also includes a timeline, a historical review of each era, biographical sketches of each speaker, and anecdotal sidebars containing additional information about the speech or speakers.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Set Introduction.
Acknowledgments.
Volume I Introduction, 1492–1815.
Volume I Chronology.
1492–1753.
Historical Overview.
1: 1492–1607: The “Discovery” and Settlement of the Americas.
2: 1607–1676: The English in the Chesapeake and New England.
3: 1677–1753: American Colonial Society Matures.
Speeches.
4: “The Requerimiento” (1513).
5: John Smith, “John Smith and Powhatan Exchange Views” (1608).
6: Chief Powhatan, “Address to Captain John Smith” (1609).
7: “Proceedings from the Virginia Assembly, 1619” (1619).
8: John Winthrop, “A Model of Christian Charity” (1630).
9: Anne Hutchinson, “Trial and Interrogation of Anne Hutchinson” (1637).
10: John Winthrop, “Speech to the General Court” (1645).
11: John Eliot, “A Dialogue Between Piumbukhou and His Unconverted Relatives” (c. 1671).
12: William Berkeley, “On Bacon’s Rebellion” (1676).
13: Nathaniel Bacon, “Declaration in the Name of the People” (1676).
14: William Penn, “Letter to the Indians” (1681).
15: “Resolutions of the Germantown Mennonites/Germantown Quaker Petition Against Slavery” (1688).
16: Cotton Mather, “Memorable Providences, Relating to Witchcrafts and Possessions” (1688).
17: “Examination of Sarah Good” (March 1, 1692).
18: “Examination of Rebecca Nurse” (March 24, 1692).
19: James Oglethorpe, “Speech to the South Carolina Assembly” (1733).
20: Andrew Hamilton, “Trial Record from the Case Against John Peter Zenger” (1735).
21: Jonathan Edwards, “Sinners in the Hand of an Angry God” (1741).
22: George Whitefield, “Marks of a True Conversion”.
23: Thomas Penn, “Speech on the Philadelphia Treaty of 1742” (1742).
24: Canasstego, “Speech on the Philadelphia Treaty of 1742” (1742).
25: Tachanoonita, “Speech on the Lancaster Treaty of 1744” (1744).
26: Scarouady, “Speech on the Carlisle Treaty of 1753” (1753).
1754–1781.
Historical Overview.
27: 1754–1763: The French and Indian War.
28: 1764–1775: The Imperial Crisis.
29: 1776–1781: Declaring and Winning Independence.
Speeches.
30: Patrick Henry, “The Virginia Stamp Act Resolves” (May 30, 1765).
31: “Declaration of Rights and Grievances/Resolutions of the Stamp Act Congress” (October 19, 1765).
32: William Pitt, “Speech on the Stamp Act” (January 14, 1766).
33: George Grenville, “Speech in the House of Commons” (January 14, 1766).
34: Benjamin Franklin, “His Examination Before the House of Commons” (February 1766).
35: “Address to the Ladies” (Song) (1760s).
36: Captain Thomas Preston, “Account of the Boston Massacre” (1770).
37: Anonymous, “Account of the Boston Massacre” (1770).
38: John Adams, “Speech at the Boston Massacre Trial” (1770).
39: Dr. Joseph Warren, “Boston Massacre Oration” (March 5, 1772).
40: John Hancock, “Boston Massacre Oration” (March 5, 1774).
41: “Revolutionary Tea” (1770s).
42: Joseph Galloway, “Speech to the Continental Congress” (September 28, 1774).
43: First Continental Congress, “Declarations and Resolves” (October 14, 1774).
44: First Continental Congress, “The Articles of Association” (October 20, 1774).
45: Dr. Joseph Warren, “Second Boston Massacre Oration” (March 6, 1775).
46: Edmund Burke, “Speech to Parliament” (March 22, 1775).
47: Patrick Henry, “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” (March 23, 1775).
48: George Washington, “Accepts His Appointment as Commander of the Continental Army” (June 16, 1775).
49: Second Continental Congress, “Declaration of the Causes and Necessity of Taking Up Arms” (July 6, 1775).
50: Second Continental Congress, “Speech to the Six Nations” (July 13, 1775).
51: King George III, “Speech to Parliament” (October 27, 1775).
52: Lord Dunmore, “A Proclamation” (November 7, 1775).
53: “Declaration of Independence” (July 4, 1776).
54: Samuel Adams, “On American Independence” (August 1, 1776).
55: King George III, “Speech to Parliament” (October 31, 1776).
56: “Yankee Doodle” (Song) (1770s & 1780s).
57: “The World Turned Upside Down” (1640s & 1781).
58: “The Dance” (1781).
1781–1800.
Historical Overview.
59: 1781–1788: The Confederation and the Constitution.
60: 1789–1796: Building a Republic.
61: 1797–1800: The First Party System Matures.
Speeches.
62: George Washington, “Newburgh Address” (March 15, 1783).
63: George Washington, “Address to the Congress in Resigning His Commission” (December 23, 1783).
64: Alexander Hamilton, “Annapolis Convention Resolution” (September 14, 1786).
65: James Madison, “Notes on the Constitutional Convention” (May 29, 1787).
66: Alexander Hamilton, “Speech at the Constitutional Convention” (June 18, 1787).
67: Benjamin Franklin, “Speech to the Constitutional Convention on State Representation” (June 28, 1787).
68: Benjamin Franklin, “Final Speech at the Constitutional Convention” (September 17, 1787).
69: James Wilson, “Speech to the Pennsylvania Ratifying Convention” (October 6, 1787).
70: Patrick Henry, “Speeches to the Virginia Ratifying Convention” (June 5, 1788 and June 7, 1788).
71: Alexander Hamilton, “Speeches to the New York Ratifying Convention” (June 21, 1788; June 24, 1788; June 27, 1788).
72: George Washington, “First Inaugural Address” (April 30, 1789).
73: James Madison, “Proposed Amendments to the Constitution” (June 8, 1789).
74: George Washington, “State of the Union Address” (October 25, 1791).
75: George Washington, “Proclamation of Militia Service” (September 25, 1794).
76: George Washington, “State of the Union Address” (December 8, 1795).
77: George Washington, “Farewell Address” (September 19, 1796).
78: John Adams, “Inaugural Address” (March 4, 1797).
79: John Adams, “Special Message to Congress on Relations with France” (May 16, 1797).
80: John Adams, “State of the Union Address” (December 8, 1798).
81: “Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions” (December 24, 1798 and December 3, 1799).
1800–1815.
Historical Overview.
82: 1800–1809: The Jeffersonian Republic.
83: 1809–1816: Mr. Madison’s War.
Speeches.
84: “Testimony in the Trial of Gabriel Prosser” (October 6, 1800).
85: Thomas Jefferson, “First Inaugural Address” (March 4, 1801).
86: Thomas Jefferson, “Second Inaugural Address” (March 4, 1805).
87: Thomas Jefferson, “Speech to a Delegation of Indian Chiefs” (January 4, 1806).
88: “Speech of the Osages, Missouri, Otos, Panis, Cansas, Ayowais, & Sioux Nations to the President of the U.S. & to the Secretary of War” (January 4, 1806).
89: Thomas Jefferson, “Special Message to Congress on the Burr Conspiracy” (January 22, 1807).
90: Thomas Jefferson, “Special Message to Congress on Gun-Boats” (February 10, 1807).
91: Aaron Burr, “Motion of Aaron Burr to Limit Prosecution Evidence” (August 20, 1807).
92: Absalom Jones, “A Thanksgiving Sermon” (January 1, 1808).
93: Thomas Jefferson, “State of the Union Address” (November 8, 1808).
94: William Hamilton, “Mutual Interest, Mutual Benefit, Mutual Relief” (January 2, 1809).
95: James Madison, “First Inaugural Address” (March 4, 1809).
96: Henry Clay, “Speech in the U.S. Senate” (February 22, 1810).
97: Tecumseh, “Speech to General William Henry Harrison” (August 11, 1810).
98: Josiah Quincy III, “Speech on the Passage of the Bill to Enable the People of the Territory of Orleans to Form a Constitution and State Government, and for the Admission of Such State into the Union” (January 14, 1811).
99: Felix Grundy, “Speech Delivered in the House of Representatives” (December 9, 1811).
100: John C. Calhoun, “Speech Delivered in the House of Representatives” (December 19, 1811).
101: Henry Clay, “On Arming for War with England” (December 31, 1811).
102: Samuel Taggart, “Speech Delivered in the House of Representatives” (February 24, 1812).
103: James Madison, “War Message to Congress” (June 1, 1812).
104: Josiah Quincy III, “On the Invasion of Canada” (January 5, 1813).
105: James Madison, “Second Inaugural Address” (March 4, 1813).
106: “Report and Resolutions of the Hartford Convention” (December 1814–January 1815).
107: James Madison, “State of the Union Address” (December 5, 1815).
Biographical Sketches.
Suggested Readings.
About the Editors.