U.S. Department of State: A Reference History, 1st Edition

  • Elmer Plischke
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 0313032882
  • ISBN-13: 9780313032882
  • DDC: 353.1
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 763 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 1999 | Published/Released December 2007
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 1999

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

This reference history describes and analyzes the State Department and Foreign Service of the United States. It also outlines the history of three major State Department functions, namely, the treatymaking process and record, representation in international conferences, and participation in international organizations and other agencies.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Frontispiece.
Title page.
Copyright Page.
Other Frontmatter.
Contents.
Illustrations.
Preface.
Glossary of Diplomatic Terms.
Glossary of Symbols and Acronyms.
1: To 1801.
2: Origins of American Diplomacy—Prelude.
3: Early Developments.
4: Union and Independence.
5: Foreign Relations of the American Confederation, 1774–1789.
6: Conclusion.
7: Notes.
8: Federalist Period—Creating the Department of State and Diplomatic Corps, 1789–1801.
9: Establishment of the Department of State.
10: Organization and Management.
11: Diplomatic and Consular Representation.
12: Treaty Making.
13: Conclusion—Status at End of Federalist Period.
14: Notes.
15: 1801–1861.
16: Post–Federalist Period—Germination and Crystallization, 1801–1829.
17: Organization and Management.
18: Diplomatic and Consular Representation.
19: Treaty Making.
20: Conclusion.
21: Notes.
22: Transition Period—Extension and Stabilization, 1829–1861.
23: Organization and Management.
24: Staffing and Reorganizing the Department.
25: Home of the Department.
26: Extraneous and Domestic Departmental Functions—Allocation and Transfer.
27: Diplomatic and Consular Representation.
28: Treaty Making.
29: Conclusion.
30: Notes.
31: 1861–1945.
32: The Road to Becoming a Great World Power—Amplification, Innovation, and Renovation, 1861–1913.
33: Presidents, Their Secretaries, and Senior Departmental Staff.
34: Composition, Reorganization, and Management.
35: Diplomatic and Consular Representation.
36: Treaty Making.
37: International Conferences and Organizations.
38: Conclusion.
39: Notes.
40: United States Becomes a Superpower—Expansion, Reorganization, and Career Consolidation, 1914–1945.
41: Presidents and their Secretaries of State.
42: Management, Reorganization, and Modernization.
43: Diplomatic and Consular Representation.
44: Treaty and Agreement Making.
45: International Conferences and Meetings.
46: International Organizations and Other Agencies.
47: Publications of the Department of State.
48: Conclusion.
49: Notes.
50: 1945–, and the Future.
51: United States as a Superpower—The Contemporary Era Since 1945.
52: The New Diplomacy.
53: Summit and Ministerial Diplomacy.
54: Presidents and Their Secretaries of State.
55: Department of State Management.
56: Diplomatic and Consular Representation.
57: Treaty Making.
58: International Conferences and Meetings.
59: Public International Organizations and Other Agencies.
60: Documents and Publications of the Department of State.
61: Notes.
62: The Future.
63: Domestic and International Environments.
64: The Department of State.
65: The Foreign Service.
66: Contemporary and Future Diplomacy.
67: Recognition and Awards.
68: Future Development and Problems.
69: “What Is Past Is Prologue”—Assessments.
70: Notes.
71: Principal Statutes and Executive Orders concerning the Department of State and the Foreign Service.
72: U.S. Law on the Conduct of American Foreign Relations.
73: U.S. Territorial Expansion.
Bibliography.
Index.
About the Author.