Current Controversies: Privacy and Security in the Digital Age, 1st Edition

  • Anne C. Cunningham
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1534500065
  • ISBN-13: 9781534500068
  • DDC: 323.44
  • Grade Level Range: 10th Grade - 12th Grade +
  • 174 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2017 | Published/Released August 2017
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2017

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

The digital age has enhanced our lives in such profound ways that its difficult to imagine how we ever coped without computers, the internet, and smartphone cameras. But along with the obvious improvements that technology offers come threats to our personal freedoms. Readers of this enlightening anthology will be faced with complicated dilemmas from a variety of informed viewpoints: Does the government have the right to monitor its citizens? Should consumers have expectations of privacy? Does video surveillance make us safer in our communities? Is security more important than liberty?

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Other Frontmatter.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Foreword.
Introduction.
Is Security More Important than Liberty?.
1: Overview: National Security and Civil Liberties in America.
2: Let's Not Worry about Privacy, Security Is More Important.
3: Enhanced Counter-terrorism Measures Are Reasonable.
4: Our Constitutional Rights Are Disappearing.
5: The First Priority Is to Protect Citizens' Rights.
Does the Government Have the Right to Monitor Its Citizens?.
6: Overview: Privacy Versus Security.
7: The Government Should Monitor Its Citizens for Safety Reasons.
8: Surveillance Is Fine, but Secrecy Isn't.
9: Government Is the Negation of Freedom.
10: The Role of Bulk Data in Thwarting Terrorism Is Minimal.
Should Consumers Have Expectations of Privacy?.
11: Overview: How Corporate Data Collection Affects Consumers.
12: Young People Oppose Online Surveillance.
13: We Need Stronger Laws to Protect Data from Government and Corporations.
14: The Coming “Internet of Things” Will Have a Dark Side.
15: Corporate Data Collection Raises Alarms.
Does Video Surveillance Make Us Safer?.
16: Overview: Video Surveillance Helps Solve Crime but Jeopardizes Privacy.
17: Potential Benefits of the Coming Surveillance State.
18: Surveillance Keeps Us Safe, Even from the Police.
19: Too Much Surveillance Is Contrary to Human Rights.
20: Surveillance Inhibits Moral Decision Making.
21: Surveillance Cameras Are a Slippery Slope.
Organizations to Contact.
Bibliography.
Index.