NEW

Women's Suffrage: The Complete Guide to the Nineteenth Amendment, 1st Edition

  • Tiffany K. Wayne
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 144087199X
  • ISBN-13: 9781440871993
  • DDC: 324.6
  • 392 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2020 | Published/Released September 2020
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2020

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

This book tells the dramatic story of American women's long fight for the vote and passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. A veritable library on all things to do with suffrage and the Nineteenth Amendment, this reference tells the heroic stories of suffragists and brings to life the ideas and deeds of the organizations that made suffrage possible. Along the way, the book delves into less well-known stories, like the experiences of African American women during the fight for suffrage, the role of labor in the suffrage movement, and the special role of Western states in the fight for voting equality. The material analyzes key moments in the suffrage fight. A comprehensive document section brings to life the arguments for and against suffrage. Included among many primary sources are Jane Addams's provocative If Men Were Seeking the Franchise (1913), Carrie Chapman Catt's Address to Congress on Women's Suffrage (1917), and many more speeches, laws, and documents.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
List of Entries.
Guide to Related Topics.
List of Primary Documents.
Introduction.
Chronology of Women’s Suffrage in the United States.
1: Addams, Jane (1860–1935).
2: African American Women and Suffrage.
3: Alpha Suffrage Club.
4: American Association of University Women (AAUW).
5: American Equal Rights Association.
6: American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA).
7: Anthony, Susan B. (1820–1906).
8: Antisuffrage Movement.
9: Beard, Mary Ritter (1876–1958).
10: Belmont, Alva Vanderbilt (1853–1933).
11: Bethune, Mary McLeod (1875–1955).
12: Blackwell, Alice Stone (1857–1950).
13: Blake, Lillie Devereux (1833–1914).
14: Blatch, Harriot Stanton (1856–1940).
15: Bloomer, Amelia Jenks (1818–1894).
16: Brown, Olympia (1835–1926).
17: Burns, Lucy (1879–1966).
18: Cary, Mary Ann Shadd (1823–1893).
19: Catt, Carrie Chapman (1859–1947).
20: College Equal Suffrage League.
21: Congressional Union.
22: Davis, Paulina Kellogg Wright (1813–1876).
23: Dorr, Rheta Childe (1866–1948).
24: Eastman, Crystal Catherine (1881–1928).
25: Equal Rights Amendment (ERA).
26: Equal Rights Party.
27: Field, Sara Bard (1882–1974).
28: Fifteenth Amendment (1870).
29: Fourteenth Amendment (1868).
30: Gage, Matilda Joslyn (1826–1898).
31: Gordon, Kate (1861–1932).
32: Harper, Frances Ellen Watkins (1825–1911).
33: Harper, Ida Husted (1851–1931).
34: History of Woman Suffrage.
35: Hooker, Isabella (1822–1907).
36: International Woman Suffrage Alliance (IWSA).
37: International Women’s Movement.
38: Jewish Women and Suffrage.
39: La Follette, Belle Case (1859–1931).
40: League of Women Voters.
41: Lee, Mabel Ping-Hua (1896–1966).
42: Lockwood, Belva (1830–1917).
43: Milholland, Inez (1886–1916).
44: Minor v. Happersett (1875).
45: Mott, Lucretia Coffin (1793–1880).
46: National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA).
47: National Association of Colored Women (NACW).
48: National Association Opposed to Woman Suffrage.
49: National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA).
50: National Woman’s Party (NWP).
51: New Departure.
52: New England Woman Suffrage Association.
53: Nineteenth Amendment (1920).
54: Park, Maud Wood (1871–1955).
55: Paul, Alice (1885–1977).
56: Pollitzer, Anita Lily (1894–1975).
57: Presidential Politics and Suffrage.
58: Rankin, Jeannette (1880–1973).
59: The Revolution.
60: Rose, Ernestine (1810–1892).
61: Ruffin, Josephine St. Pierre (1842–1924).
62: Schneiderman, Rose (1882–1972).
63: Seneca Falls Convention (1848).
64: Shafroth-Palmer Amendment.
65: Shaw, Anna Howard (1847–1919).
66: Silent Sentinels.
67: Stanton, Elizabeth Cady (1815–1902).
68: Stevens, Doris (1892–1963).
69: Stone, Lucy (1818–1893).
70: Suffrage Procession of 1913.
71: The Suffragist.
72: Talbert, Mary Burnett (1866–1923).
73: Temperance Movement.
74: Terrell, Mary Church (1863–1954).
75: Truth, Sojourner (ca. 1797–1883).
76: United States v. Susan B. Anthony (1873).
77: Vernon, Mabel (1883–1975).
78: Washington, Margaret Murray (1865–1925).
79: Weil, Gertrude (1879–1971).
80: Wells-Barnett, Ida Bell (1862–1931).
81: Western States and Suffrage.
82: Willard, Frances (1839–1898).
83: Winning Plan.
84: The Woman Citizen.
85: Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU).
86: The Woman’s Era.
87: Woman’s Journal.
88: Women’s Political Union.
89: Women’s Trade Union League (WTUL).
90: Woodhull, Victoria (1838–1927).
91: Primary Source Documents.
92: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Declaration of Sentiments (1848).
93: Lucretia Coffin Mott, Discourse on Woman (1849).
94: Ernestine Rose, On Woman’s Rights (1851).
95: “The Nonsense of It” (1866).
96: Sojourner Truth, Address to the American Equal Rights Association (1867).
97: Fourteenth Amendment (1868).
98: An Act to Grant to the Women of Wyoming Territory the Right of Suffrage (1869).
99: Fifteenth Amendment (1870).
100: Victoria Woodhull, Address before the House of Representatives (1871).
101: United States v. Susan B. Anthony, U.S. District Court, Canandaigua, New York (1873).
102: George W. Julian, “The Slavery Yet to Be Abolished” (1874).
103: Alexander Graham Bell, Letters on Woman Suffrage (1875).
104: Minor v. Happersett (1875).
105: The Declaration of Rights of the Women of the United States (1876).
106: Isabella Beecher Hooker, The Constitutional Rights of the Women of the United States (1888).
107: Frances E. W. Harper, “Woman’s Political Future” (1893).
108: Alice Stone Blackwell, Why Women Should Vote (1896).
109: Harriot Stanton Blatch, “Woman as an Economic Factor” (1898).
110: Florence Kelley, “Child Labor and Women’s Suffrage” (1905).
111: Women Opponents of Suffrage, “Why the Home Makers Do Not Want to Vote” (1909).
112: Theodore Roosevelt, “Women’s Rights; and the Duties of Both Men and Women” (1912).
113: Helen Keller, “Why Men Need Woman Suffrage” (1913).
114: Jane Addams, “If Men Were Seeking the Franchise” (1913).
115: Emmeline Pankhurst, “Freedom or Death” (1913).
116: Margaret Hinchey, Address on Working Women (1913).
117: Mary Ritter Beard, “The State Rights Shibboleth” (1914).
118: Anna Howard Shaw, Recollections of NAWSA Conventions (1915).
119: Massachusetts Anti-Suffrage Committee (1915).
120: NAACP Testimonials on Women’s Suffrage (1915).
121: Mary Church Terrell, “Woman Suffrage and the 15th Amendment” (1915).
122: Alice Paul, Letter on Imprisonment (1917).
123: Imprisoned Suffragists’ Letter to the Prisoner Commissioners (1917).
124: A. Philip Randolph, “Woman Suffrage and the Negro” (1917).
125: Carrie Chapman Catt, Address to Congress on Women’s Suffrage (1917).
126: Nineteenth Amendment (1920).
127: Crystal Eastman, “Now We Can Begin” (1920).
128: Documents from the League of Women Voters (1921).
129: National Woman’s Party Platform (1922).
About the Editor and Contributors.
Index.