The Description Logic Handbook, 1st Edition

  • Franz Baader
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 0511481233
  • ISBN-13: 9780511481239
  • DDC: 006.332
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 622 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2007 | Published/Released November 2009
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2007

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

The Description Logic Handbook is the definitive reference and study guide for researchers in the field of knowledge representation. As well as general revision throughout the book, this new edition presents a new chapter on ontology languages for the semantic web.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Other Frontmatter.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Contributors.
Preface to the Second Edition.
Preface.
An Introduction to Description Logics.
Introduction.
1: From Networks to Description Logics.
2: Knowledge Representation in Description Logics.
3: From Theory to Practice: Description Logic Systems.
4: Applications Developed with Description Logic Systems.
5: Extensions of Description Logics.
6: Relationship to other Fields of Computer Science.
7: Conclusion.
8: Theory.
9: Basic Description Logics.
10: Introduction.
11: Definition of the Basic Formalism.
12: Reasoning Algorithms.
13: Language Extensions.
14: Complexity of Reasoning.
15: Introduction.
16: OR-Branching: Finding a Model.
17: AND-Branching: Finding a Clash.
18: Combining Sources of Complexity.
19: Reasoning in the Presence of Axioms.
20: Undecidability.
21: Reasoning about Individuals in ABoxes.
22: Discussion.
23: A List of Complexity Results for Subsumption and Satisfiability.
24: Relationships with other Formalisms.
25: AI Knowledge Representation Formalisms.
26: Logical Formalisms.
27: Database Models.
28: Expressive Description Logics.
29: Introduction.
30: Correspondence Between Description Logics and Propositional Dynamic Logics.
31: Functional Restrictions.
32: Qualified Number Restrictions.
33: Objects.
34: Fixpoint Constructs.
35: Relations of Arbitrary Arity.
36: Finite Model Reasoning.
37: Undecidability Results.
38: Extensions to Description Logics.
39: Introduction.
40: Language Extensions.
41: Non-standard Inference Problems.
42: Implementation.
43: From Description Logic Provers to Knowledge Representation Systems.
44: Introduction.
45: Basic Access.
46: Advanced Application Access.
47: Advanced Human Access.
48: Other Technical Concerns.
49: Public Relations Concerns.
50: Summary.
51: Description Logic Systems.
52: New Light Through Old Windows?.
53: The First Generation.
54: Second Generation Description Logic Systems.
55: The Next Generation: Fact, Dlp and Racer.
56: Lessons Learned.
57: Implementation and Optimization Techniques.
58: Introduction.
59: Preliminaries.
60: Subsumption-testing Algorithms.
61: Theory Versus Practice.
62: Optimization Techniques.
63: Discussion.
64: Applications.
65: Conceptual Modeling with Description Logics.
66: Background.
67: Elementary Description Logic Modeling.
68: Individuals in the World.
69: Concepts.
70: Subconcepts.
71: Modeling Relationships.
72: Modeling Ontological Aspects of Relationships.
73: A Conceptual Modeling Methodology.
74: The ABox: Modeling Specific States of the World.
75: Conclusions.
76: Software Engineering.
77: Introduction.
78: Background.
79: Lassie.
80: Codebase.
81: CSIS and CBMS.
82: Configuration.
83: Introduction.
84: Configuration Description and Requirements.
85: The Prose and Questar Family of Configurators.
86: Summary.
87: Medical Informatics.
88: Background and History.
89: Example Applications.
90: Technical Issues in Medical Ontologies.
91: Ontological Issues in Medical Ontologies.
92: Architectures: Terminology Servers, Views, and Change Management.
93: Discussion: Key Lessons from Medical Ontologies.
94: OWL: A Description-Logic-Based Ontology Language for the Semantic Web.
95: Background and History.
96: Steps Towards Integration with the Semantic Web: OIL and DAML+OIL.
97: Full Integration into the Semantic Web: OWL.
98: Summary.
99: Natural Language Processing.
100: Introduction.
101: Semantic Interpretation.
102: Reasoning with the Logical Form.
103: Knowledge-Based Natural Language Generation.
104: Description Logics for Databases.
105: Introduction.
106: Data Models and Description Logics.
107: Description Logics and Database Querying.
108: Data Integration.
109: Conclusions.
Description Logic Terminology.
Notational Conventions.
Syntax and Semantics of Common Description Logics.
Additional Constructors.
A Note on the Naming Scheme for Description Logics.
Bibliography.
Index.