Berkshire Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 1st Edition

  • Editor: William Sims Bainbridge [George Mason University]
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 097430915X
  • ISBN-13: 9780974309156
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 958 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2005 | Published/Released April 2005
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2005

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

The Berkshire Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction takes computing into new realms, introducing us to topics that are intriguing both in their technical complexity and because they present us - human beings - with a set of challenging questions about our relationship with "thinking" machines. There are opportunities and risks in any new technology, and HCI has intrigued writers for many decades because it leads us to a central philosophical, religious, and even historical question: What does it mean to be human?

Contributors

Contributors

  • William Sims Bainbridge [George Mason University]

Reviews

"This will be a must buy for the public library to answer queries for information on HCI and for high school libraries. Notice should be given of its presence to guidance counselors for those sutdents seeking a career in all phases of computing. Highly recommended." --Reference for Students, March 2005

— Reference Reviews on gale.com

Table of Contents

Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Berkshire Publishing Staff.
Contents.
List of Entries.
Reader's Guide.
List of Sidebars.
Contributors.
Introduction.
Publisher's Note.
About the Editor.
1: Adaptive Help Systems.
2: Adaptive Interfaces.
3: Affective Computing.
4: Altair.
5: Alto.
6: Animation.
7: Anthropology and HCI.
8: Anthropometry.
9: Application Use Strategies.
10: Arpanet.
11: Artificial Intelligence.
12: Asian Script Input.
13: The Atanasoff-Berry Computer.
14: Attentive User Interface.
15: Augmented Cognition.
16: Augmented Reality.
17: Avatars.
18: Beta Testing.
19: Braille.
20: Brain-Computer Interfaces.
21: Browsers.
22: Cathode Ray Tubes.
23: Cave.
24: Chatrooms.
25: Children and the Web.
26: Classrooms.
27: Client-Server Architecture.
28: Cognitive Walkthrough.
29: Collaboratories.
30: Compilers.
31: Computer-Supported Cooperative Work.
32: Constraint Satisfaction.
33: Converging Technologies.
34: Cybercommunities.
35: Cybersex.
36: Cyborgs.
37: Data Mining.
38: Data Visualization.
39: Deep Blue.
40: Denial-of-Service Attack.
41: Desktop Metaphor.
42: Dialog Systems.
43: Digital Cash.
44: Digital Divide.
45: Digital Government.
46: Digital Libraries.
47: Drawing and Design.
48: E-business.
49: Education in HCI.
50: Electronic Journals.
51: Electronic Paper Technology.
52: Eliza.
53: E-mail.
54: Embedded Systems.
55: ENIAC.
56: Ergonomics.
57: Errors in Interactive Behavior.
58: Ethics.
59: Ethnography.
60: Evolutionary Engineering.
61: Expert Systems.
62: Eye Tracking.
63: Facial Expressions.
64: Fly-by-Wire.
65: Fonts.
66: Games.
67: Gender and Computing.
68: Geographic Information Systems.
69: Gesture Recognition.
70: Graphical User Interface.
71: Grid Computing.
72: Groupware.
73: Hackers.
74: Handwriting Recognition and Retrieval.
75: Haptics.
76: History of HCI.
77: Hollerith Card.
78: Human-Robot Interaction.
79: Hypertext and Hypermedia.
80: Icons.
81: Identity Authentication.
82: Impacts.
83: Information Filtering.
84: Information Organization.
85: Information Overload.
86: Information Retrieval.
87: Information Spaces.
88: Information Theory.
89: Instruction Manuals.
90: Internet—Worldwide Diffusion.
91: Internet in Everyday Life.
92: Iterative Design.
93: The Keyboard.
94: Language Generation.
95: Laser Printer.
96: Law and HCI.
97: Law Enforcement.
98: Lexicon Building.
99: Liquid Crystal Displays.
100: Literary Representations.