NEW

eBook Defining Documents in World History: Asia, 1st Edition

  • Published By: Palgrave MacMillan
  • ISBN-10: 1682179664
  • ISBN-13: 9781682179666
  • DDC: 950
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 400 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2018 | Published/Released February 2019
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2018
  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Asia has a long, rich history, with nations that continue to shape the world today, including China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. This two-volume set picks up the story at the time when Europe and the West were entering the Middle Ages. Asia was shrouded in mystery for many Europeans, and the popular myth of the inscrutability of the Asian mind took a strong hold. This set takes a detailed look at significant documents developed by scholars, politicians, warriors, emperors, scientists, and reformers, from He Zhen to Mao Zedong. Through these documents, the scope of the contributions made by individuals, groups, and nations throughout Asia can be seen. Organized into major categories that include: Philosophy and Religion; Class and Society; Politics, Revolution, and Reform; and Interactions with the West. Each primary source document, often reproduced in its entirety, includes Summary Overview, the Defining Moment, Author Biography, Document Analysis, and Essential Themes sections.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Publisher's Note.
Editor's Introduction.
Contributors.
Other Frontmatter.
China.
1: Excerpt from The Art of War, Chapter 1.
2: The Doctrine of the Mean, Section 2.
3: Excerpts from the Dao De Jing.
4: “Lessons for Women”.
5: Report from China.
6: The Hongwu Emperor's Edict.
7: Chinese Emperor's Rejection of British Trade Request.
8: Treaty of Nanking.
9: An Account of U.S.-China Trade Negotiations, 1844.
10: Economic Program of the Taiping Rebels.
11: China's Hundred Days' Reform.
12: Boxer Protocol.
13: Sun Yat-sen: “The Three Stages of Revolution”.
14: Sino-American Mutual Defense Treaty.
15: Mao Zedong on the “Correct Handling of Contradictions among the People”.
16: Constitution of Tibet.
17: Documents Relating to Normalization of Relations between the United States and the People's Republic of China.
18: Letter from a Chinese “Rusticant”.
19: U.S. Embassy Cables Concerning the Crackdown in Tiananmen Square.
Japan and Korea.
20: From The Tale of Genji.
21: From The Tale of the Heike.
22: Convention of Kanagawa.
23: Meiji Charter Oath.
24: Open Door Note.
25: The Treaty of Portsmouth.
26: Japan's 21 Demands and China's Reply.
27: Korean Declaration of Independence.
28: The Problem of Japan—A Japanese View.
29: Henry Stimson to Senator Borah Regarding the Nine-Power Treaty.
30: United States–Japan Security Treaty.
31: Fourteen-Part Message from Japan to the United States and Secretary Hull's Response.
32: Mutual Defense Treaty between the United States and the Republic of Korea.
33: Kim Il Sung—“On Eliminating Dogmatism and Formalism and Establishing Juche in Ideological Work”.
India.
34: The Edicts of King Ashoka.
35: The Duties of a King, from the Arthashastra.
36: The Laws of Manu, Chapter 1.
37: Excerpt from the Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 1.
38: An Account of India and the Great Moghul.
39: India Regulating Act.
40: Karl Marx on British Rule in India.
41: Mohandas Gandhi: Statement at Trial.
42: Jawaharlal Nehru—Speech on the Occasion of Indian Independence.
43: Indira Gandhi: “What Educated Women Can Do”.
Southeast Asia.
44: Henry Cabot Lodge: Speech on the Retention of the Philippine Islands.
45: “Subjugation of the Philippines Iniquitous”.
46: President Sukarno's Address at the Bandung Conference.
47: Geneva Accords on Indochina.
48: “The Path of Revolution in the South”.
49: President Ngô Ðình Diệm: Address to U.S. Congress.
50: Message from Ho Chi Minh.
51: Conversation between Presidents Nixon and Thiêu.
52: Story from the Khmer Rouge Killing Fields.
Appendixes.
Chronological List.
Web Resources.
Bibliography.
Index.
Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Publisher's Note.
Editor's Introduction.
Contributors.
Other Frontmatter.
China.
1: Excerpt from The Art of War, Chapter 1.
2: The Doctrine of the Mean, Section 2.
3: Excerpts from the Dao De Jing.
4: “Lessons for Women”.
5: Report from China.
6: The Hongwu Emperor's Edict.
7: Chinese Emperor's Rejection of British Trade Request.
8: Treaty of Nanking.
9: An Account of U.S.-China Trade Negotiations, 1844.
10: Economic Program of the Taiping Rebels.
11: China's Hundred Days' Reform.
12: Boxer Protocol.
13: Sun Yat-sen: “The Three Stages of Revolution”.
14: Sino-American Mutual Defense Treaty.
15: Mao Zedong on the “Correct Handling of Contradictions among the People”.
16: Constitution of Tibet.
17: Documents Relating to Normalization of Relations between the United States and the People's Republic of China.
18: Letter from a Chinese “Rusticant”.
19: U.S. Embassy Cables Concerning the Crackdown in Tiananmen Square.
Japan and Korea.
20: From The Tale of Genji.
21: From The Tale of the Heike.
22: Convention of Kanagawa.
23: Meiji Charter Oath.
24: Open Door Note.
25: The Treaty of Portsmouth.
26: Japan's 21 Demands and China's Reply.
27: Korean Declaration of Independence.
28: The Problem of Japan—A Japanese View.
29: Henry Stimson to Senator Borah Regarding the Nine-Power Treaty.
30: United States–Japan Security Treaty.
31: Fourteen-Part Message from Japan to the United States and Secretary Hull's Response.
32: Mutual Defense Treaty between the United States and the Republic of Korea.
33: Kim Il Sung—“On Eliminating Dogmatism and Formalism and Establishing Juche in Ideological Work”.
India.
34: The Edicts of King Ashoka.
35: The Duties of a King, from the Arthashastra.
36: The Laws of Manu, Chapter 1.
37: Excerpt from the Bhagavad Gita, Chapter 1.
38: An Account of India and the Great Moghul.
39: India Regulating Act.
40: Karl Marx on British Rule in India.
41: Mohandas Gandhi: Statement at Trial.
42: Jawaharlal Nehru—Speech on the Occasion of Indian Independence.
43: Indira Gandhi: “What Educated Women Can Do”.
Southeast Asia.
44: Henry Cabot Lodge: Speech on the Retention of the Philippine Islands.
45: “Subjugation of the Philippines Iniquitous”.
46: President Sukarno's Address at the Bandung Conference.
47: Geneva Accords on Indochina.
48: “The Path of Revolution in the South”.
49: President Ngô Ðình Diệm: Address to U.S. Congress.
50: Message from Ho Chi Minh.
51: Conversation between Presidents Nixon and Thiêu.
52: Story from the Khmer Rouge Killing Fields.
Appendixes.
Chronological List.
Web Resources.
Bibliography.
Index.