NEW

The World of Jim Crow America: A Daily Life Encyclopedia, 1st Edition

  • Steven A. Reich
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 144085081X
  • ISBN-13: 9781440850813
  • DDC: 305.800973
  • 848 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2019 | Published/Released September 2019
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2019

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

What was daily life really like for ordinary African American people in Jim Crow America, the period of enforced legal segregation that began immediately after the Civil War and continued until the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965? What did they eat, wear, believe, and think? How did they raise their children? How did they interact with government? What did they value? What did they do for fun? This encyclopedia explores the lives of average people through social, cultural, and material history. Supported by current research, the two-volume set examines social history topics-including family, political, religious, and economic life-as it illuminates elements of a society's emotional life, interactions, opinions, views, beliefs, intimate relationships, and connections between individuals and the greater world. Topical sections deal with different aspects of cultural life and include introductory essays and A-Z entries on aspects of each topic.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Other Frontmatter.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Preface.
Introduction.
Chronology.
Arts.
1: Actors.
2: Architecture.
3: Black Journalists.
4: Black Press.
5: Blues.
6: Children's Literature.
7: Classical Music, Black Composers of.
8: Folklore and Folktales.
9: Jazz.
10: Jim Crow Signs.
11: Jook Joints.
12: Literature.
13: Live Theater.
14: Moviegoing.
15: Quilting.
16: Race Films.
17: Race Records.
18: Uncle Remus Tales.
19: Work Songs.
Economics and Work.
20: Banking.
21: Black Businesses.
22: Building Trades.
23: Coal Miners.
24: Convict Labor.
25: Defense Industries.
26: Domestic Service.
27: Farm Ownership.
28: Insurance Agents.
29: Labor Unions.
30: Longshoremen.
31: Nurses.
32: Physicians.
33: Postal Service Workers.
34: Public-Sector Employment.
35: Railroad Workers.
36: Sharecropping and Tenant Farming.
37: Sleeping-Car Porters.
38: Steel Workers.
39: Teachers.
40: Tobacco Farming.
41: Undertakers.
Family and Gender.
42: Benevolent Societies and Fraternal Orders.
43: Birth Control.
44: Childbirth.
45: Childhood.
46: Divorce.
47: Extended (Intergenerational) Families.
48: Fertility.
49: Household Credit.
50: Household Economy.
51: Interracial Intimacies.
52: Manhood.
53: Marriage.
54: Motherhood.
55: Naming Practices.
56: Sexuality.
57: Womanhood.
58: Women's Clubs.
Fashion and Appearance.
59: African American Vernacular English.
60: Barbers and Barbershops.
61: Beauty Salons.
62: Beauty Standards.
63: Black Elites.
64: Dandyism.
65: Everyday Clothing.
66: Men's Fashion.
67: Passing.
68: Race Uplift.
69: Racial Stereotypes, Female.
70: Racial Stereotypes, Male.
71: Respectability.
72: Women's Fashion.
Food and Drink.
73: Aunt Jemima.
74: Barbecue.
75: Bars and Bartenders.
76: Canning.
77: Cookbooks.
78: Eating and Dining.
79: Gardening.
80: Grocery Stores.
81: Hunger and Malnutrition.
82: Lunch Counters.
83: Moonshining.
84: Restaurants and Cafés.
85: Traditional Core Diet.
86: Truck Farming.
Housing and Community.
87: Black Middle Class.
88: Black Towns.
89: Community and Neighborhood Life, Rural.
90: Community and Neighborhood Life, Urban.
91: Consumer Behavior.
92: Elementary and Secondary Education.
93: Fraternities and Sororities.
94: Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).
95: Hotel Accommodations.
96: Housing, Rural.
97: Housing, Suburban.
98: Industrial Education.
99: Interstate Migration.
100: Literacy.
101: Orphanages.
102: Public Restrooms.
103: Rural-To-Urban Migration.
104: Settlement Houses.
105: Sundown Towns.
106: Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA).
107: Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA).