Slavery in the United States: A Social, Political, and Historical Encyclopedia, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1851095497
  • ISBN-13: 9781851095490
  • DDC: 306.3
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 1000 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2007 | Published/Released September 2010
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2007

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About

Overview

The story of slavery in the United States is a painful one. Too often, students get little more than a cursory look at the horrors of the Middle Passage and an overview of the Civil War. This encyclopedia is a scholarly, comprehensive presentation of the whole story.

For 250 years, slavery was part of the fabric of American life. The institution had an enormous economic impact and was central to the wealth of the agrarian South. It had as great an impact on American culture, cementing racism and other attitudes that echo into the present. This encyclopedia is an ambitious examination of all the issues surrounding slavery: the origins, the justifications, the controversies, and the human drama.

These volumes represent the work of 75 distinguished scholars from around the world. Ten thematic essays present a thorough examination of slavery and slave culture, including a rare treatment of slavery from the slave's point of view. Three hundred A-Z entries provide instant access to specific people, issues, and events. Today, slavery's immorality seems obvious. This encyclopedia provides the student or general reader with an in-depth explanation of how the practice evolved and was normalized, then anathematized and abolished.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Dedication.
Other Frontmatter.
Contents.
Acknowledgments.
Contributors.
Maps.
1: Chronology of Slavery in the United States.
2: Contextual Essays.
3: Early Conquest, Colonialism, and the Origins of African Slavery.
4: Early American Slavery in the Colonies and the Hardening of Racial Distinctions.
5: Revolutionary Ideology, Citizenship, and Slavery.
6: The End of the Slave Trade and the Rise of Abolitionism.
7: The Rise of “King Cotton” and the Economics of Slavery.
8: Slavery, Paternalism, and Antebellum Southern Culture.
9: African American Culture and Strategies for Survival.
10: Slavery and the Growth of Sectional Conflict.
11: The Coming of the War and Emancipation.
12: Reconstruction: Are Liberty and Justice for All?.
13: Entries.
14: Ableman V. Booth (1859).
15: Abolitionism in the United States.
16: John Quincy Adams (1767-1848).
17: African Burial Ground.
18: African Methodist Episcopal Church.
19: Alabama Platform.
20: Richard Allen (1760-1831).
21: Alton (Illinois) Observer.
22: American Anti-Slavery Society.
23: American Colonization Society.
24: American Freedmen's Inquiry Commission.
25: American Missionary Association.
26: American Party (Know-Nothing Party).
27: Amistad Case (1841).
28: Susan Brownell Anthony (1820-1906).
29: Antiabolition Riots.
30: Antiliteracy Laws.
31: “Appeal of the Independent Democrats”.
32: An Appeal to Christian Women of the South (1836).
33: Herbert Aptheker (1915-2003).
34: Artisans.
35: Arts and Crafts.
36: Atlantic Abolitionist Movement.
37: Atlantic Slave Trade, Closing of.
38: Crispus Attucks (C. 1723-1770).
39: Autobiographies.
40: Gamaliel Bailey (1807-1859).
41: Charles Ball (B. 1780).
42: Benjamin Banneker (1731-1806).
43: Edward Beecher (1803-1895).
44: James G. Birney (1792-1857).
45: Black Belt.
46: Black Loyalists.
47: Black Nationalism.
48: Black Slaveowners.
49: Blair Education Bill.
50: Jonathan Blanchard (1811-1892).
51: Bluffton Movement (1844).
52: Border War (1854-1859).
53: Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society (1833-1840).
54: Breeding of Slaves.
55: Brooks-Sumner Affair.
56: Brown Fellowship Society.
57: Henry “Box” Brown (C. 1815-1878).
58: John Brown (1800-1859).
59: John Mifflin Brown (1817-1893).
60: William Wells Brown (C. 1814-1884).
61: James Buchanan (1791-1868).
62: Anthony Burns (C. 1830-1862).
63: William Byrd (1674-1744).
64: John C. Calhoun (1782-1850).
65: Lucretia “Patty” Hanley Cannon (C. 1764-1829).
66: Slave Catchers.
67: Elizabeth Buffum Chace (1806-1899).
68: John Chavis (1763-1838).
69: Cherokee Slaveowners.
70: Charles Waddell Chesnutt (1858-1932).
71: Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880).
72: Christiana Riot (1851).
73: Joseph Cinque (C. 1811-C. 1852).
74: Civil War (1861-1865).
75: Henry Clay (1777-1852).
76: Howell Cobb (1815-1868).
77: Code Noir.
78: Levi Coffin (1789-1877).
79: Edward Coles (1786-1868).
80: Southern Commercial Conventions (1852-1859).
81: Commonwealth V. Jennison (1783).
82: Comparative Slavery: Recent Developments.
83: Compensated Emancipation.
84: Compromise of 1850.
85: Confiscation Acts (1861-1862).
86: Contrabands.
87: Anna Julia Cooper (C. 1858-1964).
88: Cotton Gin.
89: Hannah Peirce [Pearce] Cox (1797-1876).
90: William (1827-1900) and Ellen (C. 1826-1890) Craft.
91: Prudence Crandall (1803-1889).
92: Crittenden Compromise.
93: James Dunwoody Brownson Debow (1820-1867).
94: Martin R. Delany (1812-1885).
95: Democratic Party.
96: James Derham (B. 1762).
97: Thomas Roderick Dew (1802-1846).
98: Diet.
99: Disquisition on Government (Calhoun).
100: Diseases and African Slavery in the New World.
101: Domestic Slave Trade.
102: Doughfaces.
103: Stephen A. Douglas (1813-1861).
104: Frederick Douglass (C. 1817-1895).
105: Dred Scott V. Sandford (1857).
106: Sylvia Dubois (C. 1768-1889).
107: W. E. B. Dubois (1868-1963).
108: John Murray, Fourth Earl of Dunmore (1730-1809).
109: Andrew Durnford (1800-1859).
110: Education.
111: Stanley M. Elkins (B. 1925).
112: William Ellison (1790-1861).
113: Emancipation Proclamation.
114: The Emancipator.
115: Stanley L. Engerman (B. 1936).
116: The Enlightenment.
117: Episcopal Church.
118: Fifteenth Amendment.
119: Filibusters.
120: Fire-Eaters.
121: George Fitzhugh (1806-1881).
122: Florida.
123: Eliza Lee Cabot Follen (1787-1860).
124: Charlotte Forten (1837-1914).
125: James Forten, Sr. (1766-1842).
126: Abigail Kelley Foster (1811-1873).
127: Fourteenth Amendment.
128: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese (1941-2007).
129: Franklin and Armfield.
130: Free African Society.
131: Free Persons of Color.
132: Free Soil Party.
133: Freedmen's Bureau.
134: Freeport Doctrine.
135: Fugitive Slave Act (1850).
136: Fugitive Slave Acts, State.
137: Gag Resolution.
138: Henry Highland Garnet (1815-1882).
139: Thomas Garrett (1789-1871).
140: William Lloyd Garrison (1805-1879).
141: Geechee.
142: Genius of Universal Emancipation.
143: Eugene Genovese (B. 1930).
144: Georgia.
145: Georgia Code (1861).
146: German Coast Uprising (1811).
147: Joshua Reed Giddings (1795-1864).
148: Giddings Resolutions (1842).
149: Gradualism.
150: Great Postal Campaign.
151: Angelina Grimke (1805-1879).
152: Sarah Moore Grimke (1792-1873).
153: Josiah B. Grinnell (1821-1891).
154: Gullah.
155: Gullah Jack.
156: Edward Everett Hale (1822-1909).
157: James H. Hammond (1807-1864).
158: Harpers Ferry Raid (1859).
159: Joel Chandler Harris (1848-1908).
160: Lemuel Haynes (1753-1833).
161: Hayne-Webster Debate (1830).
162: Hinton Rowan Helper (1829-1909).
163: Sally Hemings (1773-1835).
164: Josiah Henson (1789-1883).
165: Hermosa Case (1840).
166: Thomas Wentworth Higginson (1823-1911).
167: Hiring of Slaves.
168: Historiography.
169: Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910).
170: Illegal Slave Trade.
171: Immediatism.
172: Indentured Servants.
173: Infanticide.
174: Islam.
175: Harriet Ann Jacobs (1813-1897).
176: John Jasper (1812-1901).
177: Jayhawkers.
178: Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826).
179: Anthony Johnson (D. 1670).
180: Jones V. Van Zandt (1847).
181: George Washington Julian (1817-1899).
182: Juneteenth.
183: Kansas-Nebraska Act (1854).
184: Elizabeth Keckley (C. 1818-1907).
185: Frances Anne Kemble (1809-1893).
186: Knights of the Golden Circle.
187: Ladies' New York City Anti-Slavery Society (1835-1840).
188: John Laurens (1754-1782).
189: Joshua Leavitt (1794-1873).
190: Lecompton Constitution.