NEW

eBook Documents of the Reformation, 1st Edition

  • John A. Wagner
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1440860831
  • ISBN-13: 9781440860836
  • DDC: 270.6
  • 320 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2019 | Published/Released April 2019
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2019
  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

The Protestant Reformation was a pivotal event in world history and religion. This text collects more than 60 primary documents that shed light on the personalities, issues, ideas, and events of the 16th-century upheaval and will help readers to understand how and why the Protestant Reformation began and transpired as it did. The book is divided into 12 sections on topics such as indulgences, persecution, and women in the Reformation, each of which offers five document selections. Detailed introductions preceding the documents put them into historical context and explain why they are important, while a general introduction and chronology help readers to understand the Reformation in broad terms and to see causal connections. Bibliographies of current print and digital resources attend each document, and a general bibliography lists seminal works on the Reformation.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Recent Titles in the Eyewitness to History Series.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Dedication.
Contents.
Preface.
Acknowledgments.
Evaluating and Interpreting Primary Documents.
Introduction.
Chronology.
The Late Medieval Church and Its Discontents.
1: “The Babylon of the West”: Petrarch’s Letter Criticizing the Papal Court at Avignon (1340s).
2: “The Church of England Began to Go Mad after Temporalities”: The Lollard Conclusions (1395).
3: “Proud, Avaricious, and Defiled with Every Crime”: Jan Hus and the Council of Constance (1415).
4: “The Wealth of the Kingdom Goes into the Hands of Foreigners”: The Pragmatic Sanction of Bourges (1438).
5: “Our Mincing School-Men”: Erasmus’s Description of Contemporary Theologians from The Praise of Folly (1511).
Indulgences.
6: “This Doctrine Is a Manifold Blasphemy against Christ”: The Passage on Indulgences from John Wycliffe’s Treatise Trialogus (1384).
7: “The Pain of Purgatory Is Altogether Done Away With”: The Instructions (Instructio Summaria) of Archbishop Albrecht of Mainz Regarding the Sale of the New Indulgence (1515).
8: “Don’t You Hear the Voices of Your Wailing Dead Parents”: Excerpts from Johann Tetzel’s Sermon on Indulgences (1517).
9: “What Else Can I Do”: Martin Luther’s Letter to Archbishop Albrecht of Mainz Regarding Indulgences (1517).
10: “This Honourable Name of Indulgences Is Blasphemed by Heretics”: The Decree on Indulgences Issued by the Council of Trent (1563).
Martin Luther.
11: “I Am as Awkward as a Child”: Martin Luther’s Letter to Pope Leo X (1518).
12: “I Have Not Been Humble Enough”: Martin Luther’s Letter to Tomas de Vio, Cardinal Cajetan (1518).
13: “From the Word I Would Not Depart”: Martin Luther’s Account of His Hearing before the Diet of Worms (1521).
14: “I Consider God Has Blinded Them”: Martin Luther Describes the Marburg Colloquy to His Wife (1529).
15: “The Greatest and Most Horrible Abomination”: Excerpts from Martin Luther’s Schmalkald Articles (1537).
Reformation on the Continent—Germany, Switzerland, and France.
16: “The Rash Men of Wittenberg”: Johann Eck’s Description of the Leipzig Disputation (1519).
17: “One Simple Truth and Christian Concord”: The Augsburg Confession (1530).
18: “Popes Began to Seize upon Kingdoms for Themselves”: Philip Melanchthon’s “Treatise on the Power and Primacy of the Pope” (1537).
19: “We Reject Traditions Which Contradict the Scriptures”: The Second Helvetic Confession (1562).
20: “The King … Concedes Liberty to All”: The Edict of Amboise Ends the First War of Religion in France (1563).
The Peasants’ War.
21: “Christendom Is Being So Wretchedly Devastated by Ravenous Wolves”: Thomas Müntzer’s “Sermon to the Princes” (1524).
22: “On Holy Easter There Was Neither Singing Nor Preaching”: An Account of the Peasants’ War (1525).
23: “There Was No Way Out But to Die”: An Account of the Weinsberg Massacre (1525).
24: “It Is Consistent with Scripture That We Should Be Free”: The 12 Articles of the Swabian Peasants (1525).
25: “We Should Nevertheless Organize and Maintain a Convened Army”: Agenda for the “Peasant Parliament” in Heilbronn (1525).
Ulrich Zwingli.
26: “I Made a Firm Resolution Not to Interfere with Any Female”: Zwingli’s Letter Responding to Charges of Sexual Misconduct (1518).
27: “Christ Scorns the Property and Pomp of This World”: The 67 Articles Defended by Ulrich Zwingli (1523).
28: “That Rash Man Keeps Killing Human and Divine Wisdom”: Zwingli’s Letter to Conrad Som Complaining of Martin Luther (1528).
29: “He Compelled Me to Seize a Pen”: Ulrich Zwingli’s Letter to Joachim Vadian Concerning the Marburg Colloquy (1529).
30: “They Set Up a Court of Injustice on Zwingli”: Bullinger’s Account of the Death of Ulrich Zwingli (1531).
Anabaptism.
31: “Who Will Prevent Me from Baptizing Him?”: Account of Georg Blaurock’s Rebaptism of Adults in Zürich (1525).
32: “Baptism of Infants, the Supreme Abomination of the Roman Pontiff”: The Schleitheim Confession (1527).
33: “Racked on Account of Anabaptism”: An Official Account of the Death of Balthasar Hubmaier (1528).
34: “Baptism Is Here Restored”: Bernard Rothmann’s Account of Anabaptism in Münster (1534).
35: “Tortured with Fiery and Glowing Tongs”: Report of the Execution of Jan of Leiden and the Münster Anabaptist Leaders (1536).
John Calvin.
36: “Hungering and Thirsting after Christ”: John Calvin’s Prefatory Address to His Institutes of the Christian Religion (1536).
37: “Lest He Should Expose the Whole Kingdom to Derision”: John Calvin Warns Philip Melanchthon of the Duplicity of the King of France (1545).
38: “I Subdue My Grief as Well as I Can”: John Calvin’s Letter on the Death of His Wife (1549).
39: “He Is a Monster Not to Be Borne”: John Calvin’s Letters Describing the Arrest and Condemnation of Michael Servetus (1553).
40: “Profane Men Lay Hold of the Subject of Predestination to Carp”: John Calvin on the Doctrine of Predestination (1559).
Women in the Reformation.
41: “Let Us Now Chiefly Consider Women”: Excerpts from Malleus Maleficarum (The Hammer of Witches) (1487).
42: “Some Brought Hatchets”: Female Participation in the German Peasants’ War (1525).
43: “We Will Remain Unvanquished”: Catholic Women Resist the Reformers—The Short Chronicle of Jeanne de Jussie (ca. 1534).
44: “Why Then Is It Necessary to Gossip about Women?”: Letter of Marie Dentière to the Queen of Navarre (1539).
45: “Who Has Delivered Me from Myself”: A Mystical Reformation—The Autobiography of Saint Teresa of ávila (1562).
Persecution.
46: “The Hangman Shall Dispute with You”: An Account of the Trial and Execution of Michael Sattler (1527).
47: “Unpatiently Took His Death”: The Executions of Friar Forest and John Lambert (1538).
48: “I Have Been a Hater of Falsehood”: John Foxe’s Description of the Burning of Archbishop Thomas Cranmer (1556).
49: “They Threw the Body through the Window into the Courtyard”: An Account of the St. Bartholomew’s Day Massacre in France (1572).
50: “I Must Leave You Here”: Excerpts from the Letter of Janneken van Munstdorp, an Imprisoned Anabaptist, to Her Newborn Daughter (1573).
Reformation in the British Isles—England and Scotland.
51: “True, Sincere, and Uniform Doctrine of Christ’s Religion”: The Act of Six Articles (1539).
52: “Great Inconveniences … of Compelled Chastity”: The Edwardian Act Legalizing Clerical Marriage (1549).
53: “Shall I Believe This Church? God Forbid!”: The Examination of Lady Jane Grey (1554).
54: “So Must I Be Subject to Them?”: John Knox’s Account of His Meeting with Queen Mary of Scotland (1561).
55: “Hiding Their Most Detestable and Devilish Purposes”: The Elizabethan Act against Recusants (1593).
The Catholic Reformation.
56: “The Whole World Eagerly Desires This Kind of a Reformation”: Pope Adrian VI’s Memorandum of Instruction to His Representative at the German Diet (1522).
57: “One Day the Eyes of His Soul Were Opened”: The Autobiography of St. Ignatius of Loyola (1555).
58: “A True and Singular Sacrifice”: Decree of the Council of Trent on the Mass (1562).
59: “The Ruffians Were Bawling and Yelling”: The English Jesuit John Gerard Describes Hiding in a Priest Hole (1591).
60: “This Night through Which the Soul Has to Pass”: Excerpt from The Dark Night by St. John of the Cross (1618).
Appendix 1 Comparison of Catholic and Protestant Positions on Key Doctrines.
Appendix 2 Sixteenth-Century Monarchs and Popes.
Bibliography.
Index.
About the Author.