The American Midwest: An Interpretative Encyclopedia, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 0253112095
  • ISBN-13: 9780253112095
  • DDC: 977.003
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 1890 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2007 | Published/Released June 2007
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2007

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

This first-ever encyclopedia of the Midwest seeks to embrace this large and diverse area, give it voice, and help define its distinctive character. Organized by topic, it encourages readers to reflect upon the region as a whole. Each section moves from the general to the specific, covering broad themes in longer introductory essays, filling in the details in the shorter entries that follow. There are portraits of each of the region's twelve states, followed by entries on society and culture, community and social life, economy and technology, and public life.

This work offers a wealth of information about the region's surprising ethnic diversity -- a vast array of foods, languages, styles, religions, and customs -- plus well-informed essays on the region's history, culture and values, and conflicts. A site of ideas and innovations, reforms and revivals, and social and physical extremes, the Midwest emerges as a place of great complexity, signal importance and continual fascination.

Reviews

"This comprehensive encyclopedia will prove an invaluable resource for school, public and academic libraries." --Lawrence Looks at Books, November 2007

— Lawrence Looks at Books

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Donors.
National Editorial Advisory Board.
In Praise of the Middle Way.
General Contents.
Reader’s Guide.
Preface and Acknowledgments.
General Overview.
1: Landscapes and People.
2: Portraits of the Twelve States.
3: Section Contents.
4: Overview.
Illinois.
Indiana.
Iowa.
Kansas.
Michigan.
Minnesota.
Missouri.
Nebraska.
North Dakota.
Ohio.
South Dakota.
Wisconsin.
5: Images of the Midwest.
6: Section Contents.
7: Overview.
8: Fertility.
9: Land of Flatness.
10: Flyover Country.
11: Genuine America.
12: Heartland.
13: Movies.
14: Television.
15: Rust Belt.
16: Seasonality.
17: Vastness.
18: Yeoman Farmer.
19: Midwest as a Young Adult.
20: Prairie Aesthetics.
21: Barns.
22: Corn Belt Cubes and Other Vernacular Houses.
23: German America.
24: Russian-German America.
25: Nordic America.
26: Up North.
27: Grain Elevators.
28: Windmills.
29: Silos.
30: John Deere and Other Tractors.
31: Landscapes of Steel.
32: Yoopers.
33: Hedgerows.
34: Hurley, Hibbing, and Iron-Mining Landscapes.
35: Duluth Ore Boats.
Garrison Keillor’s Lake Wobegon.
Mark Twain’s Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn.
Dorothy Gale and Oz.
Sinclair Lewis’s Main Street and Babbitt.
Willa Cather’s Alexandra and Ántonia.
Sherwood Anderson’s Winesburg, Ohio.
Boundary Waters, Minnesota.
Brown County, Indiana.
Branson, Missouri.
Corn Palace, South Dakota.
Door County, Wisconsin.
Traverse City, Michigan.
Phil Stong’s State Fair.
Gene Stratton-Porter’s Limberlost.
36: Robert S. Lynd and Helen Merrell Lynd’s Middletown.
Harold Bell Wright’s Shepherd of the Hills.
Grant Wood’s American Gothic.
37: Johnny Carson (1925–2005).
Meredith Willson’s The Music Man.
M*A*S*H’s “Radar” O’Reilly.
Field of Dreams.
Hamlin Garland’s Middle Border Books.
Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House Books.
O. E. Rølvaag’s Giants in the Earth.
Dubuque, Iowa.
38: Jay N. “Ding” Darling’s Uncle John Iowa Cartoons.
Midwest Living.
Better Homes and Gardens.
39: Buckeye.
40: Hoosier.
41: Jayhawk.
42: Superman and His Kansas Roots.
43: Jesse James (1847–1882).
44: James Whitcomb Riley’s Bucolic Poetry.
45: Radio Stations.
46: Geography.
47: Section Contents.
48: Overview.
49: Geology.
50: Climate.
51: Landforms.
52: Flora.
53: Fauna.
54: Agriculture.
55: Cultural Geography.
56: Manufacturing.
57: Primary Extractive Industries.
58: Rectangular Public Land Survey System.
59: Transportation.
60: Urbanization.
61: Notable Physical Regions.
Des Moines Lobe.
Door Peninsula.
Driftless Area.
Flint Hills.
Grand Prairie.
Great Lakes.
Isle Royale.
Keweenaw Peninsula.
Mesabi Range.
Mississippi River.
Missouri River.
Osage Plains.
Ozark Highland.
62: Notable Cultural Regions.
63: Illinois Military Tract.
64: Little Dixie.
65: Little Egypt.
66: Miami Valley.
67: Scandinavian Regions of the Upper Midwest.
Upper Peninsula, Michigan.
68: Virginia Military District.
69: Western Reserve.
70: Peoples.
71: Section Contents.
72: Overview.
Eighteenth-Century Native Americans.
Woodlands.
Plains.
Métis.
Nineteenth-Century Americans.
Yankees/Yorkers.
Middle Atlantic Europeans.
Upland Southerners.
French Canadians.
African Americans.
Early and Rural Nineteenth-Century Europeans.
English.
Scots.
Welsh.
French.
Germans.
Irish.
Peoples of the Low Countries (Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg).
Norwegians.
Swedes.
Danes and Icelanders.
Swiss.
Late Nineteenth-Century Europeans, Mexicans, and Asians.
Balts.
Greeks.
Hungarians.
Italians.
Jews.
Poles.
Romanians.
Slovaks.
South Slavs.
Czechs.
Russians and East Slavs.
Mexicans and Mexican Americans.
Finns.
73: Twentieth-Century Southern Migration.
African Americans.
Southern Whites and Appalachians.
74: Late-Twentieth-Century Immigration.
Asian Indians.
Chinese.
Japanese.
Koreans.
Filipinos.
Vietnamese.
Hmong and Cambodians.
Lebanese.
Other Middle Easterners.
Urban Native Americans.
Latino/as.
75: Out-Migration.
76: Society and Culture.
77: Language.
78: Section Contents.
79: Overview.
80: Varieties of English.
81: Pronunciation.
82: Vocabulary.
83: Grammar.
84: Language and Society.
85: African American Vernacular.
86: African American Language.
87: Narratives.
88: Slang.
89: Geographic Names.