Student's Guide to the U.S. Presidency, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1604266767
  • ISBN-13: 9781604266764
  • DDC: 352.230973
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 416 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2009 | Published/Released January 2010
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2009

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

An indispensable reference for young researchers, specifically designed for the classroom.

Specifically written to engage high school students, Student's Guide to the Presidency presents a comprehensive overview of the history and ongoing evolution of the American executive branch. This single-volume resource does not require any prior knowledge of the presidency and covers topics that meet national high school curriculum standards. The third installment of the Student's Guide to the U.S Government series is also appropriate for introductory American government college classes. Teachers and students alike will want to use this resource in preparation for exams and research papers.

The text features three main sections that present a uniquely integrated approach to studying the U.S. presidency.

Part One consists of three informative essays addressing compelling topics on the presidency:

  • The Executive Branch: Behind the Scenes Since 1789
  • Power Trip? How Presidents Have Increased the Power of the Office
  • Is the U.S. President the Most Powerful Leader in the World?

Part Two is an alphabetical section of key words and concepts spanning Adams, John, to Wilson, Woodrow. The definitions are supplemented by sidebars with biographies of decision makers, spotlights on momentous events and key issues, legal milestones and scandals regarding the presidency, and point/counterpoint coverage of controversial issues. Recent entries include the 2008 election of Barack Obama.

Part Three complements the first two sections with a generous selection of influential primary source material, including inaugural addresses, constitutional amendments involving the election of the president and presidential succession, and political cartoons A crisp layout unites the text with illuminating photos, maps, charts, tables, timelines, and humorous political cartoons to provide a clear picture of the presidency.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Student's Guides to the U.S. Government Series.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
List of Illustrations.
Reader's Guide.
About the Advisory Editor.
Preface.
Historical Milestones of the U.S. Presidency, 1788–2009: A Timeline.
1: Essays.
2: The Executive Branch: Behind the Scenes Since 1789.
3: Power Trip? How Presidents have Increased the Power of the Office.
4: Is the U.S. President the Most Powerful Leader in the World?.
5: The Presidency A to Z.
6: Adams, John, Administration of (1797–1801).
Justice for All: Midnight Judges.
7: Adams, John Quincy, Administration of (1825–1829).
8: Air Force One.
9: Arthur, Chester A., Administration of (1881–1885).
10: Assassinations and Assassination Attempts.
11: Buchanan, James, Administration of (1857–1861).
12: Bush v. Gore (2000).
Justice for All: The Dred Scott Case (1857).
13: Bush, George H.W., Administration of (1989–1993).
14: Bush, George W., Administration of (2001–2009).
15: Cabinet.
16: Carter, Jimmy, Administration of (1977–1981).
17: Chief Diplomat.
18: Chief Economist.
19: Chief Executive.
20: Chief of State.
21: Civil Service System.
22: Cleveland, Grover, Administrations of (1885–1889, 1893–1897).
23: Clinton, Bill, Administration of (1993–2001).
24: Commander in Chief.
25: Constitution of the United States.
26: Constitutional Convention and the Presidency.
27: Conventions, Presidential Nominating.
Justice for All: Geraldine Ferraro (1935– ).
28: Coolidge, Calvin, Administration of (1923–1929).
29: Democratic Party (1828– ).
30: Department of Agriculture (USDA).
31: Department of Commerce.
32: Department of Defense (DOD).
Spotlight: Department of War and Department of the Navy.
33: Department of Education.
34: Department of Energy (DOE).
35: Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
36: Department of Homeland Security (DHS).
Decision Makers: Michael Chertoff (1953–).
37: Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).
Decision Makers: Alphonso Jackson (1945–).
38: Department of Justice.
Justice for All: John Mitchell (1913–1988).
39: Department of Labor.
40: Department of State.
Decision Makers: Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826).
41: Department of the Interior.
Justice for All: Albert Fall (1861–1944).
42: Department of the Treasury.
Decision Makers: Alexander Hamilton (1757–1804).
43: Department of Transportation (DOT).
44: Department of Veterans Affairs.
45: Eisenhower, Dwight D., Administration of (1953–1961).
46: Election of 2008.
47: Elections, Presidential.
48: Electoral College.
49: Emergency Powers.
50: Executive Agreements.
51: Executive Departments.
52: Executive Orders.
53: Federalism.
54: Federalist Party (1792–1816).
55: Fillmore, Millard, Administration of (1850–1853).
56: First Lady.
Spotlight: Martha Washington and Laura Bush.
57: Ford, Gerald R., Administration of (1974–1977).
58: Foreign Policy and the Presidency.
59: Garfield, James A., Administration of (1881).
60: Gore, Albert (1948– ).
61: Government Agencies and Corporations.
62: Grant, Ulysses S., Administration of (1869–1877).
63: Harding, Warren, Administration of (1921–1923).
64: Harrison, Benjamin, Administration of (1889–1893).
65: Harrison, William Henry, Administration of (1841).
66: Hayes, Rutherford B., Administration of (1877–1881).
67: Hoover, Herbert, Administration of (1929–1933).
68: Impeachment, Presidential.
69: Impoundment Powers.
70: Inaugural Address.
71: Jackson, Andrew, Administration of (1829–1837).
72: Jefferson, Thomas, Administration of (1801–1809).
73: Johnson, Andrew, Administration of (1865–1869).
74: Johnson, Lyndon B., Administration of (1963–1969).
75: Kennedy John F., Administration of (1961–1963).
Spotlight: The Berlin Wall, 1961 and 1989.
76: Legislative Leader.
77: Lincoln, Abraham, Administration of (1861–1865).
Spotlight: Jefferson Davis.
78: Line-Item Veto.
79: Madison, James, Administration of (1809–1817).
80: McKinley, William, Administration of (1897–1901).
81: Monroe, James, Administration of (1817–1825).
82: National Security Council.
Decision Makers: Henry Kissinger (1923–).
83: Nixon, Richard M., Administration of (1969–1974).
84: Oath of Office.
85: Office of Management and Budget.
86: PACs (Political Action Committees).
87: Pierce, Franklin, Administration of (1853–1857).
88: Pocket Veto.
89: Political Parties and the President.
90: Polk, James, Administration of (1845–1849).
91: Presidency and Congress.
92: Presidency and the Bureaucracy.
93: Presidency and the Media.
94: Presidency and the Supreme Court.
95: Presidency, Qualifications for.
96: Presidential Appearances and Public Appeals.
97: Presidential Campaigns.
98: Presidential Commissions.
99: Presidential Debates.
100: Presidential Disability.
Point/Counterpoint: Should Third Party Candidates Participate in Presidential Debates?.
101: Presidential Pardons.
102: Presidential Primaries.
103: Presidential Salaries and Benefits.
104: Presidential Succession.
Point/Counterpoint: Should Presidential Vacancies be Filled by Special Election?.
105: Public Opinion and the Presidency.
106: Reagan, Ronald, Administration of (1981–1989).
107: Republican Party (1854–).
108: Roosevelt, Franklin D., Administration of (1933–1945).
109: Roosevelt, Theodore, Administration of (1901–1909).
110: Secret Service.
Spotlight: Who is Eligible for Secret Service Protection?.
111: Separation of Powers.
112: State of the Union Address.
113: Taft, William Howard, Administration of (1909–1913).
114: Taylor, Zachary, Administration of (1849–1850).
115: Third Parties and Presidential Elections.
Point/Counterpoint: Are Third Parties Relevant?.
116: The Transition Period.
117: The Treaty Power.
118: Truman, Harry S., Administration of (1945–1953).
119: Twelfth Amendment (1804).
120: Twentieth Amendment (1933).
121: Twenty-fifth Amendment (1967).
122: Twenty-fourth Amendment (1964).
123: Twenty-second Amendment (1951).
Point/Counterpoint: Should the Twenty-second Amendment be Repealed?.
124: Twenty-third Amendment (1961).
125: Tyler, John, Administration of (1841–1845).
126: Van Buren, Martin, Administration of (1837–1841).
127: Veto Power.
128: Vice Presidency.
129: Vice Presidential Vacancies.
130: War Powers Resolution.
131: Washington, George, Administration of (1789–1797).
Spotlight: Precedents Established by George Washington.
132: Watergate Scandal.
133: Whig Party (1834–1856).
134: White House.
Spotlight: White House Renovations.
135: Wilson, Woodrow, Administration of (1913–1921).
136: Primary Source Library.
137: United States Constitution, Article I, Section 7, 1789.
138: United States Constitution, Article II, Section 3, 1789.
139: Twelfth Amendment, 1804.
140: Thomas Jefferson Being Robbed by King George III and Napoleon, 1809.
141: King Andrew I, 1832.
142: A Hard Road to Hoe, 1840.
143: Keep the Ball Rolling, 1840.
144: Harrison Memorial Ribbon, 1841.
145: James Buchanan's Inauguration, March 4, 1857.
146: Union is Dissolved! 1860.
147: Lincoln's First Inaugural Address, 1861.
148: Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address, 1865.
149: Congressional Government, 1885.
Point/Counterpoint: Two Views of Executive Authority.
150: President McKinley Shot Down, 1901.
151: Twentieth Amendment, 1933.
152: Roosevelt's Four Freedoms Speech, 1941.
153: Twenty-second Amendment, 1951.
154: Twenty-third Amendment, 1961.
155: Twenty-fourth Amendment, 1964.
156: Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, 1964.
157: Twenty-fifth Amendment, 1967.
158: Vice President Spiro T. Agnew Resigns, 1973.
159: President Richard Nixon's Letter of Resignation, August 9, 1974.
160: Gerald R. Ford's Pardon of Richard Nixon, 1974.
161: George W. Bush's Speech, September 11, 2001.
162: State of the Union Address, 2008.
Using Primary Sources.
Glossary.
Selected Bibliography.
General Index.