Encyclopedia of Nanoscience and Society, 1st Edition

  • Published By: SAGE
  • ISBN-10: 1412972094
  • ISBN-13: 9781412972093
  • DDC: 620.503
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 960 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2010 | Published/Released May 2011
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2010

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

This encyclopedia focuses on the efforts of governments around the world to fund nanoscience research and to tap its potential for economic development as well as to assess how best to regulate a new technology for the environmental, occupational, and consumer health and safety issues related to the field. Contributions examine and analyze the cultural significance of nanoscience and nanotechnologies and describe some of the organizations, and their products, that promise to make nanotechnologies a critical part of the global economy. Written by noted scholars and practitioners from around the globe, these two volumes offer nearly 500 entries describing the societal aspects of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
About the General Editor.
Introduction.
Reader’s Guide.
List of Articles.
List of Contributors.
Chronology of Nanoscience.
1: Abbott Pharmaceuticals.
2: Ableism.
3: Acceptance Politics.
4: Access.
5: Active Nanotechnology.
6: Aeon Flux.
7: Agrifood.
8: American Scientific Affiliation.
9: American Society for Nanomedicine.
10: Anticipation.
11: Anticipation in Action.
12: Anticipatory Governance.
13: Argentina.
14: Arms Control.
15: Artificial Intelligence.
16: Asbestos.
17: Asia Pacific Nanotechnology Forum.
18: Association of German Engineers.
19: Australia.
20: Australia Nanobusiness Forum.
21: Australian Office of Nanotechnology.
22: Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority.
23: Australian Research Council Nanotechnology Network.
24: Bainbridge, William.
25: BASF.
26: Benny the Bear.
27: Berkeley, California, Local Regulatory Efforts.
28: Bibliometrics.
29: Big Science.
30: Bioethics.
31: Biomimetics.
32: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (UK).
33: Blood-Brain Barrier.
34: Blood Music.
35: Brain–Machine Interface, Ethical Issues of.
36: Brazil.
37: Buckyballs.
38: California.
39: Cambridge, Massachusetts, Local Regulatory Efforts.
40: Canada.
41: Canadian NanoBusiness Alliance.
42: Cancer Treatment, Nanoenabled.
43: Carbon Nanotubes.
44: Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology.
45: Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology.
46: Center for Nanotechnology in Society (ASU).
47: Center for Nanotechnology in Society (UCSB).
48: Center for Responsible Nanotechnology.
49: Center on Nanotechnology and Society (Kent School of Law).
50: Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics (Australia).
51: Centre for Bioethics and Public Policy (UK).
52: China.
53: Clariant.
54: Climate Change.
55: Clinton, William J..
56: Codes of Conduct, Corporate.
57: Codes of Conduct, Professional.
58: Comics and Nanotechnology.
59: Commercial Incubators.
60: Commercialization.
61: Commission for Atomic Energy (France).
62: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (Australia).
63: Community Research and Development Information Service.
64: Competitiveness and Technonationalism.
65: Computational Nanotechnology.
66: Congressional Nanotechnology Caucus.
67: Consensus Conference on Nanotechnology.
68: Consumer Products Inventory.
69: Consumer Reports.
70: Control.
71: Converging Technologies.
72: Coordination for Training of University Professors (Brazil).
73: Corporate Research and Development.
74: Corporate Responsibility.
75: Cost-Benefit Analysis.
76: Data-Mining.
77: DEEPEN Project.
78: Definitions of Nanotechnology.
79: Degussa.
80: Democratizing Nanotechnology.
81: Democs.
82: Demos: A Network for Ideas and Action.
83: Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (UK).
84: Department of Agriculture (U.S.).
85: Department of Defense (U.S.).
86: Department of Energy (U.S.).
87: Department of Health (UK).
88: Desalinization.
89: Design and Construction.
90: Diamond Age, The.
91: Directed Evolution.
92: Direct Support/Investment.
93: Disability and Nanoscience.
94: Disruptive Technology.
95: Drexler, K. Eric.
96: Drexler-Smalley Debates.
97: Dual Use.
98: DuPont.
99: Electronics and Information Technology.
100: Emergence.
101: Emerging Nanopatterning Methods.
102: Emerging Technologies.
103: Enabling Technology.
104: Energy.
105: Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (UK).
106: Engines of Creation.
107: Entrepreneurs in Nanoscience.
108: Environmental Benefits.
109: Environmental Defense Fund.
110: Environmental Ethics/Philosophy and Nanotechnology.
111: Environmental Protection Agency (U.S.).
112: Environment Canada.
113: Epistemology of Nanotechnology.
114: Equity.
115: Eros and Nano.
116: ETC Group.
117: Ethics and Risk Analysis.
118: European Union.
119: Export Controls.
120: ExxonMobil.
121: Fate and Transport of Nanoparticles.
122: Federal Agency for Occupational Health (Germany).
123: Federal Environment Agency (Germany).
124: Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act.
125: Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (Germany).
126: Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (German).
127: Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation, and Technology (Austria).
128: Federal Ministry of Education and Research (Germany).
129: Feynman, Richard.
130: Food.
131: Food and Consumer Goods Authority (Netherlands).
132: Food and Drug Administration (U.S.).
133: Food Packaging.
134: Food Standards Australia New Zealand.
135: Foresight.
136: Foresight Institute.
137: Framework Programs.
138: Framing.
139: France.
140: Friends of the Earth Nanotechnology Project.
141: Fullerene.
142: Funding Authority for Studies and Projects (Brazil).
143: Future.
144: Gender and Nanotechnology.
145: General Electric.
146: General Purpose Technology.
147: Genetically Modified Foods.
148: Geopolitical Implications.
149: German Research Foundation.
150: Germany.
151: G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra.
152: Globalization.
153: Global Value Chains.
154: Governance.
155: Government Laboratories (U.S.).
156: Green Nanotechnology.
157: Greenpeace.
158: Grenoble.
159: “Grey Goo” Scenario.
160: Health and Environmental Risks (Netherlands).
161: Health Canada.
162: Healthcare and Life Sciences.
163: Helmholtz Institutes.
164: Historical Examples of Nanomaterials.
165: History-in-the-Making.
166: Human Enhancement.
167: Human Enhancement, Biological Risks.
168: Human Nature.
169: Hyle.
170: IBM.
171: Images.
172: India.
173: Indigenous Nanotechnology.
174: Industrial Policy (Brazil).
175: Innovation.
176: InnovationSpace.
177: Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis (Germany).
178: Institute of Technology Assessment (Austria).
179: Insurance.
180: Integration.
181: Intellectual Property Rights.
182: Interdisciplinarity.
183: Interdisciplinary Research Centers.
184: International Center for Technology Assessment.
185: International Council on Nanotechnology.
186: International Development.
187: International Dialogue.
188: International Nanotechnology and Society Network.
189: International Risk Governance Council.