The New York Times on the Presidency, 1st Edition

  • Meena Bose Hofstra University
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1604266910
  • ISBN-13: 9781604266917
  • DDC: 973.099
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 640 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2008 | Published/Released November 2009
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2008

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

The first title in a new imprint that pairs expert political analysis with rich historical news coverage, The New York Times on the Presidency is a fascinating new reference book that uses nearly 150 years of New York Times' reporting to explore the dynamic nature of the presidency in the American political system.

Reviews

"This documentary examination of presidential history stretches more than 29 administrations from Franklin Pierce to George W. Bush. This 156 year period has witnessed an extraordinary growth of the Executive Branch and the power of the presidency. Presidential scholar Meena Bose selects nearly 500 documents to illustrate these changes from the expansion of the military during the Civil War to the extension of executive privileges in the wake of 9/11. The articles are arranged chronologically by presidential administration. Each chapter provides quick facts on the life of the president, a summary of the major issues of his campaigns and highlights of his tenure in office. Critical commentary on each document explains its historical context. The selection includes speeches, news reports, editorials and letters to the editor. From Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and reactions to Woodrow Wilson’s 'revolutionary' appearance before Congress to frets about 1929 stock market crash and anguish over Kennedy’s assassination, the entries illuminate critical points in the development of the presidency and its relationship with Congress, the courts and the public. The result is a powerful tool for understanding American political history. A detailed index linking issues and a selective bibliography of additional readings on each administration fill out this useful resource for students. This volume is recommended for high school, public and academic libraries."--Lawrence Looks at Books, May 2009

— Lawrence Looks at Books

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Other Frontmatter.
Contents.
About the Editorial Cartoons in The New York Times on the Presidency.
About Timesreference from CQ Press.
Introduction.
1: The Presidency of Franklin Pierce March 4, 1853 – March 4, 1857.
2: “The Democratic Nomination,” June 7, 1852.
3: “Acceptance of the Democratic Nominees,” June 25, 1852.
4: “Sad Railroad Accident; Son of Gen. Pierce Killed,” January 7, 1853.
5: “The Gadsden Treaty Ratified,” April 26, 1854.
6: “The Nebraska Bill—Prospects and Results of its Passage,” May 12, 1854.
7: “Cuba—War and Slavery,” April 11, 1855.
8: “Startling News From Kansas,” May 26, 1856.
9: “Poor Pierce,” June 9, 1856.
10: The Presidency of James Buchanan March 4, 1857 – March 4, 1861.
11: “Decision of the Supreme Court in the Dred Scott Case,” March 7, 1857, and “The Dred Scott Decision,” July 15, 1857.
12: “The Lecompton Constitution,” February 1, 1858, and “A Lecompton Trap,” March 26, 1858.
13: “Senatorial Contest in Illinois—Speech of Mr. Lincoln,” July 16, 1858, and “Administration War on Douglas,” October 2, 1858.
14: “The Virginia Insurrection,” October 19, 1859.
15: “What Mr. Buchanan Means,” December 22, 1860, and “The President’s Message,” January 11, 1861.
16: The Presidency of Abraham Lincoln March 4, 1861 – April 15, 1865.
17: “Reasons for Voting the Republican Ticket,” November 2, 1860.
18: “The Election—Lincoln Triumphant,” November 7, 1860.
19: “The New Administration,” March 5, 1861.
20: “About Fort Sumpter,” March 18, 1861.
21: “The Habeas Corpus, and the Merriman Case,” June 2, 1861.
22: “Increase of the Regular Army,” July 9, 1861.
23: “The President’s Proclamation,” September 28, 1862, and “Emancipation: President Lincoln’s Proclamation,” January 3, 1863.
24: “Our Special Army Correspondence,” July 8, 1863, and “The Heroes of July,” November 20, 1863.
25: “The Reign of the Rabble,” July 15, 1863.
26: “The President’s Message,” December 10, 1863.
27: “The Union National Convention—No Postponement,” April 27, 1864, and “The Baltimore Nomination,” June 10, 1864.
28: “The President’s Proclamation on Reconstruction,” July 11, 1864.
29: “What Makes the Triumph Complete,” November 21, 1864.
30: “President Lincoln Shot by an Assassin,” April 15, 1865, and “The Murder of President Lincoln,” April 16, 1865.
31: “The Last Address of the President to the Country,” April 17, 1865.
32: The Presidency of Andrew Johnson April 15, 1865 – March 4, 1869.
33: “The Amnesty Proclamation,” May 31, 1865, and “The Form of a Pardon,” August 21, 1865.
34: “The Civil Rights Bill and the President’s Veto,” March 28, 1866.
35: “The Contest and its Results,” November 8, 1866.
36: “The Tenure of Office Bill,” March 4,1867.
37: “Our New Possessions on the Pacific Coast—Peaceable Annexation,” September 22, 1867.
38: “The President and Mr. Stanton,” December 17, 1867.
39: “The Effects of Acquittal,” May 16,1868, and “Impeachment Ended,” May 27, 1868.
40: “Johnson as the Democratic Candidate,” June 24, 1868.
41: “The Fourteenth Amendment,” July 31, 1868.
42: “Ex-President Johnson,” February 4, 1875.
43: The Presidency of Ulysses S. Grant March 4, 1869 – March 4, 1877.
44: “Grant’s Great Triumph,” November 4, 1868.
45: “Gen. Grant’s Inaugural,” March 5, 1869.
46: “President Grant’s Cabinet,” March 6, 1869.
47: “The Public Credit Bill,” March 15, 1869.
48: “The Reconstruction Policy of the South,” March 2, 1870.
49: “The Fifteenth Amendment,” April 2, 1870.
50: “Order in the South,” May 27, 1871.
51: “British ‘Humiliation’ in the Treaty of Washington,” June 29, 1871.
52: “A Fragment of History,” March 30, 1872.
53: “The Two Candidates,” November 1, 1872.
54: “President Grant on the Third-Term Question,” May 31, 1875, and “No Third Term,” November 5, 1875.
55: “Impeachability After Resignation of Office,” March 8, 1876.
56: The Presidency of Rutherford B. Hayes March 4, 1877 – March 4, 1881.
57: “Presidential Election: Results Still Uncertain,” November 8, 1876, and “Election Excitement: The Public Still Anxious About the Result,” November 11, 1876.
58: “Closing Acts of the Count,” March 3, 1877.
59: [No Headline] March 6, 1877.
60: “The Northern Democrats and Mr. Hayes,” April 2, 1877.
61: “The Situation at Washington,” July 23, 1877.
62: “What of Civil Service Reform?” September 9, 1877.
63: “The President’s Position,” March 2, 1878.
64: “The President and the Custom-House,” July 12, 1878, and “The Custom-House Changes,” July 15, 1878.
65: The Presidency of James A. Garfield March 4, 1881 – September 19, 1881.
66: “The New-York Nominees,” April 2, 1881.
67: “The Assassination,” July 3, 1881.
68: The Presidency of Chester A. Arthur September 20, 1881 – March 4, 1885.
69: “The Oath Administered,” September 20, 1881, and “President Arthur,” September 21, 1881.
70: [No Headline] May 9, 1882.
71: “Reform Again Triumphs,” January 5, 1883, and “The Reform Commissioners,” February 11, 1883.
72: “Civil Rights Cases Decided,” October 16, 1883, and “Colored Men Disappointed,” October 17, 1883.
73: “Rebuilding the Navy,” December 8, 1883.
74: “Arthur’s Weakness in New-York,” April 8, 1884.
75: “The Nicaragua Treaty,” January 17, 1885.
76: The Presidency of Grover Cleveland March 4, 1885 – March 4, 1889, March 4, 1893 – March 4, 1897.
77: “The Charges Swept Away,” August 12, 1884, and [No Headline], October 27, 1884.
78: “’For President, Grover Cleveland!’ Why?” October 4, 1884.
79: “The Victory of Honesty,” November 9, 1884.
80: “The Indians’ Surplus Land,” April 5, 1886.
81: “The White House Bride,” May 29, 1886, and “The President’s Wedding,” June 2, 1886.
82: “Railroad Regulation,” January 16, 1887.
83: “The Pension Veto,” February 12, 1887.
84: “The President’s Message,” December 7, 1887.
85: “Mr. Cleveland’s Popular Plurality,” December 6, 1888.
86: “A New Cabinet Officer,” February 1, 1889.
87: “Mr. Cleveland is Elected,” November 9, 1892.
88: “The President’s Message,” August 8, 1893.
89: “Back To Buzzard’s Bay,” August 12, 1893.
90: “Second Proclamation Made,” July 10, 1894.
91: “The New Tariff in Operation,” August 28, 1894.
92: “The Country is Aroused,” December 20, 1895.
93: The Presidency of Benjamin Harrison March 4, 1889 – March 4, 1893.
94: “Tariff Reform Deferred,” November 8, 1888.
95: “The Final Preparations,” December 15, 1889.
96: “A New Anti-Trust Bill,” March 19, 1890.
97: “Bid for Soldiers’ Votes,” April 1, 1890.
98: “Don’t Like the Bill,” June 8, 1890.
99: [No Headline], October 28, 1890.
100: “Comfort for Harrison,” November 6, 1890.
101: “Wise and Sensible Chile!” January 26, 1892.
102: “End of the Homestead Strike,” November 21, 1892.
103: “Opposed to the Treaty,” February 18, 1893.
104: The Presidency of William McKinley March 4, 1897 – September 14, 1901.
105: “McKinley and Hobart of New-Jersey,” June 19, 1896.
106: “Bryan’s Bid for First Place,” July 10, 1896.
107: “Prices and the Tariff,” May 20, 1897.
108: “The Maine Blown Up,” February 16, 1898.
109: “Hawaii is Now American,” July 8, 1898.
110: “An American Protectorate,” July 8, 1898.
111: “War Suspended, Peace Assured,” August 13, 1898.
112: “Outline of the Treaty,” December 14, 1898, and “Senate Ratifies the Peace Treaty,” February 7, 1899.
113: “The Open Door in China,” December 31, 1899.
114: “M’Kinley and Roosevelt,” June 22, 1900.
115: “The Republicans’ Sweeping Victory,” November 8, 1900.
116: “Boston Witness’s Story,” September 8, 1901, and “Mr. M’Kinley Dies After a Brave Fight,” September 14, 1901.
117: The Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt September 14, 1901 – March 4, 1909.
118: “Mr. Theodore Roosevelt,” September 14, 1901.
119: “President Roosevelt Worries Senators,” September 29, 1901.
120: “The Irrigation Bill,” June 16, 1902.
121: “President Roosevelt Talks on Coal Strike,” September 6, 1902.
122: “Checks on Immigration,” March 4, 1903.
123: “President to Make Treaty,” November 14, 1903.
124: “Supreme Court Wrecks Merger,” March 15, 1904.
125: “Roosevelt: Sweeps North and West and is Elected President,” November 9, 1904.
126: “President’s Act May Bring Peace,” August 20, 1905.
127: “Meat Bill is Passed After Brief Debate,” June 20, 1906.
128: “Guard Purity of Food by Strict Regulations,” October 21, 1906.
129: “Battleship Fleet to Circle World,” September 5, 1907.
130: “Many Urge Third Term,” May 1, 1908.
131: “200 Roosevelt Men Bolt,” June 30, 1912.
132: The Presidency of William Howard Taft March 4, 1909 – March 4, 1913.
133: “Tariff Bill Ready for House To-day,” March 17, 1909.
134: “Pinchot Ousted; Party War on,” January 8, 1910, and “la Follette Attacks Taft,” January 15, 1910.
135: “Taft is not Pleased by Roosevelt Plan,” September 3, 1910.
136: “Democrats Sweep Country; Win Congress, Many States,” November 9, 1910.
137: “Reapportionment Passes,” August 4, 1911.
138: An Untrammeled Judiciary,” August 16, 1911.
139: “Taft Urges Treaty to Help Honduras,” October 14, 1911.
140: “An American Force Lands in Nicaragua,” August 6, 1912.
141: “Wilson First, Taft Second,” November 5, 1912, and “Wilson Wins,” November 6, 1912.
142: Income Tax Ratified by Delaware’s Vote,” February 4, 1913.
143: “What Taft Plans at Yale,” February 26, 1913.
144: The Presidency of Woodrow Wilson March 4, 1913 – March 4, 1921.
145: “Congress Cheers Greet Wilson,” April 9, 1913, and “The President’s Innovation,” April 9, 1913.
146: “Popular Election of Senate in Force,” June 1, 1913.
147: “Tariff Bill Passed; May Sign it To-Day,” October 3, 1913.
148: “Wilson Apology to Colombia?” April 9, 1914.
149: “Trade Board Bill Passes the Senate,” August 6, 1914.
150: “Lusitania Sunk by a Submarine, Probably 1,000 Dead,” May 8, 1915, and “Wilson Proclaims Neutrality Again,” May 26, 1915.
151: “More Marines Landed in Santo Domingo,” May 16, 1916.
152: “Wilson the Victor, M’Cormick Insists,” November 8, 1916.
153: “Government Acts Swiftly,” April 7, 1917.
154: “Appeals to German People,” January 9, 1918, and “The President’s Triumph,” January 11, 1918.
155: “Republicans Win Senate and House,” November 6, 1918.
156: “War Ends at 6 O’Clock this Morning,” November 11, 1918.
157: “Ovation to the President,” July 11, 1919.
158: “Crowds Besiege President’s Train, Now Speeding East,” September 23, 1919.
159: “Wilson’s Illness Disturbs Senate,” September 27, 1919.
160: “Wilson has a Ride; First in Five Months,” March 4, 1920.
161: “America Isolated Without Treaty,” March 20, 1920.
162: “President Hails Suffrage Victory,” August 20, 1920.
163: The Presidency of Warren G. Harding March 4, 1921 – August 2, 1923.
164: “Arranged During Recess,” June 13, 1920, and “the Nomination of Harding,” June 13, 1920.
165: “That Ideal Campaign Front Porch,” June 20, 1920.
166: “Mr. Harding’s Attorney General,” February 22, 1921.
167: “Taft Selected as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court,” March 29, 1921.
168: “Immigration Bill Passed by Senate,” May 4, 1921.
169: “Senate Agrees to New Budget Bill,” May 27, 1921.
170: “Ratify Colombia Payment,” October 15, 1921.
171: “Conference to Open with Aim to Speed Arms Cut Decision,” November 11, 1921.
172: “President is Expected to Pardon Debs When Freeing Other War Offenders Friday,” December 21, 1921.
173: “Washington Dazed by Big Reversal,” November 9, 1922.
174: “Daugherty Charges are Held Not True,” January 10, 1923.
175: “Harding Worn Out, Coolidge Holds,” August 1, 1923.
176: “Death Stroke Came Without Warning,” August 3, 1923.
177: “Government Opens Teapot Dome Suit; Secrecy Admitted,” March 10, 1925.
178: “Daugherty Indicted as Conspirator in Alien Metals Sale,” May 8, 1926.
179: The Presidency of Calvin Coolidge August 3, 1923 – March 4, 1929 the Presidency of Calvin Coolidge.
180: “Coolidge Takes the Oath of Office,” August 3, 1923, and “Coolidge Sworn in at Farm Homestead,” August 4, 1923.
181: “Coolidge Meets 150 Correspondents,” August 15, 1923.
182: “A Foreign Service at Last,” May 22, 1924, and “Foreign Service Unified,” May 25, 1924.
183: “President’s Son, Calvin Jr., 16, Dies as Parents Watch,” July 8, 1924, and “10,000 Sent Sympathy to Coolidges by Wire; President’s Father With him in White House,” July 12, 1924.
184: “Mellon Tells Chief of Hopes in Europe,” September 5, 1924.
185: “Coolidge Dictated Campaign Policies,” November 9, 1924.
186: “Coolidge to Accept Estate Tax Repeal,” January 23, 1926.
187: “Coolidge Facing a Hostile Senate,” November 4, 1926.
188: “Text of President Coolidge’s Statement of Renunciation, Made by him Yesterday,” December 7, 1927.
189: “Regulars Quit Coolidge,” May 25, 1928.
190: “Coolidge Pleased by his Role Abroad,” November 7, 1928.
191: “Coolidge Puts Name to Our Acceptance of Anti-War Treaty,” January 18, 1929.
192: The Presidency of Herbert Hoover March 4, 1929 – March 4, 1933.

Meet the Author

Author Bio

Meena Bose

Meena Bose is Executive Dean for Public Policy and Public Service programs in the Peter S. Kalikow School of Government, Public Policy and International Affairs at Hofstra University. She also directs Hofstra’s Peter S. Kalikow Center for the Study of the American Presidency. The author or editor of several volumes in presidency studies and American politics, Dr. Bose teaches courses on the American presidency, presidential leadership and policymaking and American politics. She taught for six years at the United States Military Academy at West Point, and she is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She received her Ph.D. from Princeton University and her B.A. from The Pennsylvania State University.