Encyclopedia of Educational Reform and Dissent, 1st Edition

  • Published By: SAGE
  • ISBN-10: 1412957400
  • ISBN-13: 9781412957403
  • DDC: 371.200973
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 1042 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2010 | Published/Released May 2011
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2010

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Educational reform, and to a lesser extent educational dissent, occupy a prominent place in the annals of U.S. education. Whether based on religious, cultural, social, philosophical, or pedagogical grounds, they are ever present in our educational history. Although some reforms have been presented as a remedy for society's ills, most programs were aimed toward practical transformation of the existing system to ensure that each child will have a better opportunity to succeed in U.S. society. Educational reform is a topic rich with ideas, rife with controversy, and vital in its outcome for school patrons, educators, and the nation as a whole. With nearly 450 entries, these two volumes comprise the first reference work to bring together the strands of reform and reformers and dissent and dissenters in one place. Opens with a historical overview of educational reform and dissent and a timeline of key reforms, legislation, publications, and more. Examines the reform or dissent related to education found in theories, concepts, ideas, writings, research, and practice. Addresses how reformers and dissenters become significant culture shaping people.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Editorial Board.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
List of Entries.
Reader's Guide.
About the Editors.
Contributors.
Preface.
Introduction.
Historical Timeline.
1: Ability Grouping.
2: Academic Freedom.
3: Academies.
4: Accelerated Schools.
5: Accountability Era.
6: Accreditation.
7: Achieve, Inc..
8: Achievement Gap.
9: ACT and SAT Tests.
10: Addams, Jane (1860–1935).
11: Adequacy.
12: Affirmative Action.
13: Afrocentric Schools.
14: Age Grading.
15: Agostini v. Felton.
16: Algebra Project.
17: Alliance for School Choice.
18: Alliance for the Separation of School & State.
19: Alternative Assessment.
20: Alternative Licensure.
21: Alternative Schools.
22: American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education.
23: American Association of School Administrators (AASA).
24: American Diploma Project.
25: American Enterprise Institute.
26: American Federation of Teachers (AFT).
27: Americanization.
28: American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC).
29: American Sign Language.
30: Amish and Mennonite Schools.
31: Art Education.
32: Ashton-Warner, Sylvia (1908–1984).
33: Assertive Discipline.
34: Assessment.
35: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.
36: Autism.
37: Ball, William B. (1916–1999).
38: Beckner, William M. (1841–1910).
39: Beecher, Catharine (1800–1878).
40: Behaviorism.
41: Bennett Law.
42: Berkeley Plan.
43: Bethune, Mary McLeod (1875–1955).
44: Bilingual Education.
45: Black Alliance for Educational Options.
46: Black High School Study.
47: Block Scheduling.
48: Bloom's Taxonomy.
49: Blow, Susan E. (1843–1916).
50: Board of Education v. Rowley.
51: Boards of Education.
52: Brookings Institution.
53: Brown v. Board of Education.
54: Bruner, Jerome S. (1915–).
55: Business and Educational Reform.
56: Busing.
57: Butler, Nicholas Murray (1862–1947).
58: Calvinist Schools.
59: Cardinal Principles Report.
60: Career Education.
61: Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.
62: Carnegie Unit.
63: Catholic Schools.
64: Central School District v. Allen.
65: Character Education.
66: Charter Education.
67: Charter Schools.
68: Christian Day Schools.
69: Civic Education.
70: Civil Rights Act of 1964.
71: Class Size.
72: Coalition of Essential Schools.
73: Co-Curricular Activities.
74: Coeducation.
75: Coleman, James S. (1926–1995).
76: Collective Bargaining.
77: College Board.
78: Comer, James P. (1934–).
79: Committee of Fifteen.
80: Committee of Ten.
81: Common School Movement.
82: Community Control.
83: Compensatory Education.
84: Competency-Based Education.
85: Comprehensive High Schools.
86: Comprehensive School Reform.
87: Compulsory Attendance.
88: Conant, James Bryant (1893–1978).
89: Concerned Women for America (CWA).
90: Conflict Management.
91: Consolidation of School Districts.
92: Constructivism.
93: Continuation Schools.
94: Cooperative Learning.
95: Council for American Private Education (CAPE).
96: Council for Basic Education.
97: Council for Exceptional Children.
98: Council of the Great City Schools.
99: Counts, George S. (1889–1974).
100: Creationism.
101: Cristo Rey Schools.
102: Critical Literacy.
103: Critical Theory.
104: Cubberley, Ellwood (1868–1941).
105: Culturally Relevant Teaching.
106: Curriculum Controversies.
107: Curriculum Reconceptualists.
108: Dabney, Robert L. (1820–1898).
109: Dame Schools.
110: De Facto Segregation.
111: De Jure Segregation.
112: Desegregation/Integration.
113: Developmentally Appropriate Practice.
114: Dewey, John (1859–1952).
115: Differentiated Instruction.
116: Differentiated Staffing.
117: Direct Instruction.
118: Dispositions.
119: District Schools.
120: Diversity.
121: Douglass, Frederick (1818–1895).
122: Drexel, Katharine (1858–1955).
123: Dual Enrollment.
124: Du Bois, W. E. B. (1868–1963).
125: Dunbar High School, Washington, D.C..
126: Early Childhood Education.
127: Early College High Schools.
128: Ebonics.
129: Edgerton Bible Case.
130: Educational Management Organizations.
131: Educational Policies Commission.
132: Educational Radio.
133: Educational Reform During the Great Depression.
134: Educational Technology.
135: Educational Television.
136: Educational Testing Service (ETS).
137: Education Commission of the States (ECS).
138: Education of the Deaf.
139: Education of the Visually Impaired.
140: Education Sector.
141: Education Week.
142: Effective Schools Movement.
143: Eight-Year Study.
144: Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
145: Elementary Curricular Reform.
146: Eliot, Charles W. (1834–1926).
147: Engel v. Vitale.
148: English as a Second Language (ESL).
149: Episcopal Schools.
150: Equal Education Opportunity.
151: Equity.
152: Essentialism.
153: Ethical Theories.
154: Everson v. Board of Education.
155: Evidence-Based Education (EBE).
156: Exodus Mandate Project.
157: Experiential Learning.
158: Extracurricular Activities.
159: Family and Consumer Sciences.
160: Family Research Council.
161: Faribault-Stillwater Plan.
162: Federal Educational Reform.
163: Feminist Perspectives.
164: Finn, Chester E., Jr. (1944–).
165: Flesch, Rudolf (1911–1986).
166: Flint Approach to Community Involvement.
167: Foundations in the Local School District.
168: Franklin, Benjamin (1706–1790).
169: Freedmen's Bureau.
170: Free School Movement.
171: Freire, Paulo (1921–1997).
172: Friedman, Milton (1912–2006).
173: Gallaudet, Edward (1837–1917).
174: Gary Plan.
175: Gates Foundation.
176: General Education.
177: General Education Board.
178: Gibbons, James Cardinal (1834–1921).
179: Gifted Education.
180: Giroux, Henry A. (1943–).
181: Goals 2000.
182: Goodlad, John (1920–).
183: Goodman, Paul (1911–1972).
184: Greek Orthodox Schools.
185: Greeley, Andrew M. (1928–).
186: Guidance and School Counseling.
187: Haley, Margaret (1861–1939).