Terrorism Informatics, 1st Edition

  • Editor: Hsinchun Chen, Edna Reid, Joshua Sinai, Andrew Silke
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 0387716130
  • ISBN-13: 9780387716138
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 640 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2008 | Published/Released April 2010
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2008

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Terrorism informatics has been defined as the application of advanced methodologies, information fusion and analysis techniques to acquire, integrate process, analyze, and manage the diversity of terrorism-related information for international and homeland security-related applications. The wide variety of methods used in terrorism informatics are derived from Computer Science, Informatics, Statistics, Mathematics, Linguistics, Social Sciences, and Public Policy and these methods are involved in the collection of huge amounts of information from varied and multiple sources and of many types in numerous languages. Information fusion and information technology analysis techniques - which include data mining, data integration, language translation technologies, and image and video processing - play central roles in the prevention, detection, and remediation of terrorism. Terrorism Informatics: Knowledge Management and Data Mining for Homeland Security will provide an interdisciplinary and comprehensive survey of the state-of-the-art in the terrorism informatics domain along three basic dimensions: methodological issues in terrorism research; information infusion techniques to support terrorism prevention, detection, and response; and legal, social, privacy, and data confidentiality challenges and approaches. Featuring contributions by leading researchers and practitioners, illustrative case studies, and applications of terrorism informatics techniques, the book will be an essential resource for scientists, security professionals, counterterrorism experts, and policy makers.

Contributors

Contributors

  • Hsinchun Chen
  • Edna Reid
  • Joshua Sinai
  • Andrew Silke

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Other Frontmatter.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Table of Contents.
Preface.
Editor Biographies.
Author Biographies.
1: Methodological Issues in Terrorism Research.
2: Domain Mapping of Contemporary Terrorism Research.
3: Domain Mapping of Contemporary Terrorism Research: Chapter Overview.
4: Introduction.
5: Related Work.
6: Research Design.
7: Results.
8: Conclusion.
9: Acknowledgements.
10: References.
11: List of 42 Influential Terrorism Researchers (as of dec. 2003).
12: Suggested Readings.
13: Online Resources.
14: Discussion Questions.
15: Research on Terrorism: A Review of the Impact of 9/11 and the Global War on Terrorism.
16: Research on Terrorism: A Review of the Impact of 9/11 and the Global War on Terrorism: Chapter Overview.
17: Introduction.
18: The Nature of this Review.
19: Trends in Data-Gathering and Analysis.
20: Research on Terrorist Groups.
21: Research on Terrorist Tactics.
22: Some Conceptual Issues.
23: Conclusions.
24: References.
25: Suggested Readings.
26: Discussion Questions.
27: Who are the Key Figures in ‘Terrorism Studies’?.
28: Who are the Key Figures in ‘Terrorism Studies’?: Chapter Overview.
29: Introduction.
30: Constructing the Framework: The Multiplicity of ‘Terrorism Studies’, the Role of the Audience, and the Importance of Methodological Rigour.
31: Employing the Framework: Selecting the Time Period; Constructing the Research Community.
32: Constructing the Audience.
33: Measuring the Opinions of the Relevant Audience: What does the Peer Research Community Think?.
34: Establishing the Threshold: Exactly What Determines an Expert as Key?.
35: Conclusion.
36: References and Footnotes.
37: Suggested Readings.
38: Discussion Questions.
39: Interviewing Terrorists: A Case for Primary Research.
40: Interviewing Terrorists: A Case for Primary Research: Chapter Overview.
41: Introduction.
42: Procuring Interviews.
43: A Case Illustration: Interviews with the IRA.
44: Finding and ‘Collecting’ Participants.
45: A Case Example: Interviewing a Terrorist.
46: Interview Considerations.
47: Issues of Validity and Reliability.
48: Conclusions.
49: Post-Script.
50: References.
51: Suggested Readings.
52: Discussion Questions.
53: Resolving a Terrorist Insurgency by Addressing its Root Causes.
54: Resolving a Terrorist Insurgency by Addressing its Root Causes: Chapter Overview.
55: Introduction.
56: Why Root Causes are Significant.
57: How to Resolve a Conflict's Root Causes.
58: Conclusion.
59: References and Footnotes.
60: Suggested Readings.
61: Online Resources.
62: Discussion Questions.
63: A Quantitative Analysis of “Root Causes of Conflict”.
64: A Quantitative Analysis of “Root Causes of Conflict”: Chapter Overview.
65: Introduction.
66: Conflict Indicators and Automatic Data Analysis For Early Warning.
67: LSA Applied to English Articles in EMM.
68: Results and Discussion.
69: Conclusions and Future Work.
70: References.
71: Suggested Readings.
72: Online Resources.
73: Discussion Questions.
74: Appendices.
75: Tables.
76: Conflict Indicators.
77: Figures.
78: Word Lists.
79: Countering Terrorism with Knowledge.
80: Countering Terrorism with Knowledge: Chapter Overview.
81: Introduction.
82: Problems in Researching Terrorism.
83: Problems in Terrorism Research.
84: Problems in Terrorism Databases.
85: Mipt as an Information Clearinghouse.
86: Mipt-Funded Terrorism Databases.
87: Mipt Terrorism Knowledge Base.
88: Better Knowing What We Know About Terrorism.
89: Acknowledgements.
90: References.
91: Suggested Readings.
92: Online Resources.
93: Discussion Questions.
94: Toward a Target-Specific Method of Threat Assessment.
95: Toward a Target-Specific Method of Threat Assessment: Chapter Overview.
96: Introduction.
97: Methodology.
98: Organization-Specific Indicators.
99: Synthesis.
100: Summary: Scenarios Most Likely to be Carried Out by Relevant Terrorist Groups.
101: Conclusion.
102: Suggested Readings.
103: Online Resources.
104: Discussion Questions.
105: Identifying and Exploiting Group Learning Patterns for Counterterrorism.
106: Identifying and Exploiting Group Learning Patterns for Counterterrorism: Chapter Overview.
107: Introduction.
108: Organizational Learning.
109: A Four Stage Model of Organizational Learning.
110: Paths of Organizational Learning.
111: Determinants of Organizational Learning.
112: How an Organizational Learning Model Can Inform the Design of Terrorism Informatics Systems.
113: Conclusions and Discussion.
114: Acknowledgements.
115: Notes.
116: References.
117: Suggested Readings.
118: Online Resources.
119: Discussion Questions.
120: Homeland Insecurity: Data Mining, Privacy, Disclosure Limitation, and the Hunt for Terrorists.
121: Homeland Insecurity: Data Mining, Privacy, Disclosure Limitation, and the Hunt for Terrorists: Chapter Overview.
122: Introduction.
123: Homeland Security and the Search for Terrorists.
124: Matching and Record Linkage Methods.
125: Encryption, Multi-Party Computation, and Privacy-Preserving Datamining.
126: Selective Revelation, Risk-Utility Tradeoff, and Disclosure Limitation Assessment.
127: Analyzing Network Data Based on Transactions.
128: Conclusions.
129: Acknowledgments.
130: Notes.
131: References.
132: Suggested Readings.
133: Discussion Questions.
134: Terrorism Informatics to Support Prevention, Detection, and Response.
135: Case Study of Jihad on the Web: A Web Mining Approach.
136: Case Study of Jihad on the Web: A Web Mining Approach: Chapter Overview.
137: Introduction.
138: Previous Research.
139: Proposed Approach.
140: Analysis Results.
141: Discussion and Future Work.
142: References.
143: Suggested Readings.
144: Online Resources.
145: Discussion Questions.
146: Studying Global Extremist Organizations' Internet Presence Using the Dark Web Attribute System: A Three Region Comparison Study.
147: Studying Global Extremist Organizations' Internet Presence Using the Dark Web Attribute System: A Three Region Comparison Study: Chapter Overview.
148: Introduction.
149: Literature Review.
150: Studying Global Extremist Organizations' Internet Usage: A Three-Region Empirical Study.
151: Conclusions and Future Directions.
152: References.
153: Suggested Readings.
154: Online Resources.
155: Discussion Questions.
156: Content Analysis of Jihadi Extremist Groups' Videos.
157: Content Analysis of Jihadi Extremist Groups' Videos: Chapter Overview.
158: Introduction.
159: Related Work.
160: Methodology.
161: Results.
162: Conclusion.
163: Acknowledgements.
164: References.
165: Suggested Readings.
166: Online Resources.
167: Discussion Questions.
168: Analysis of Affect Intensities In Extremist Group Forums.
169: Analysis of Affect Intensities In Extremist Group Forums: Chapter Overview.
170: Introduction.
171: Related Work.
172: Research Gaps and Questions.
173: Research Questions.
174: Research Design.
175: System Design.
176: Evaluation.
177: Results.
178: Conclusions.
179: References.
180: Suggested Readings.
181: Online Resources.
182: Discussion Questions.
183: Document Selection for Extracting Entity and Relationship Instances of Terrorist Events.
184: Document Selection for Extracting Entity and Relationship Instances of Terrorist Events: Chapter Overview.
185: Introduction.
186: Literature Review.
187: Domain Specific Event Entity Relation Extraction Task with Document Ranking.
188: Case Studies.
189: Conclusions and Discussion.
190: Acknowledgements.
191: References.