Understanding the Literature of World War I: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents, 1st Edition

  • James H. Meredith
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 0313058156
  • ISBN-13: 9780313058158
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 183 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2004 | Published/Released September 2007
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2004

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Presents five specific issues and themes that recur in WWI literature: war at the front; women and the home front; war poetry; strategic technology of modern war: propaganda and civilian bombing; and aftermath.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
The Greenwood Press "Literature in Context" Series.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Other Frontmatter.
Contents.
Acknowledgments.
Introduction.
World War I Chronology.
1: War at the Front: An Analysis of Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms (1929), Erich Maria Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front (1929), and Robert Graves's Good-bye to All That (1929).
2: From the Jevtic Account of the Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, 28 June 1914.
3: From the "Blank Check" Communique, 6 July 1914.
4: From the Austro-Hungarian Ultimatum to Serbia, 23 July 1914.
5: From the Austro-Hungarian Declaration of War on Serbia, 28 July 1914.
6: From the German Declaration of War on Russia, 1 August 1914.
7: From the German Request for Free Passage through Belgium, 2 August 1914.
8: From the Belgian Refusal of Free Passage, 3 August 1914.
9: From King Albert I's Speech to the Belgian Parliament, 4 August 1914.
10: From Clemenceau's Call to Arms, 5 August 1914.
11: From President Wilson's Declaration of Neutrality, 19 August 1914.
12: From the Triple Entente Declaration on No Separate Peace, 4 September 1914.
13: From Marshal Joffre's Report on the Marne, August-September 1914.
14: From Trench Warfare Begins on the Aisne, 18 September 1914.
15: From the Diary of Thomas Reginald Part, an Australian Soldier Who Fought in World War I, 15 December 1915.
16: From the German Deserter's War Experience [Anonymous], Translated by J. Koettgen, 1917.
17: From A Volunteer Poilu, Henry Sheehan, 1916.
18: From Diary, Marine Flyer in France Captain Alfred A. Cunningham, November 1917 to January 1918.
19: Topics for Written and Oral Discussion.
Notes.
Suggestions for Further Reading.
20: Women and the Home Front: An Analysis of Edith Wharton's A Son at the Front (1922).
21: From the Women of Belgium: Turning Tragedy to Triumph, Charlotte Kellogg.
22: Topics for Written and Oral Discussion.
Notes.
Suggestions for Further Reading.
23: War Poetry and Pat Barker's Regeneration (1991).
24: From Siegfried Sassoon's "A Soldier's Declaration" Counter-Attack.
25: From the Hydra: The Magazine of the Craiglockhart War Hospital, No.7, 21 July 1917.
26: Topics for Written and Oral Discussion.
Notes.
Suggestions for Further Reading.
27: The Strategic Technology of Modern Warfare: Propaganda and Civilian Bombing.
28: From Propaganda Posters.
29: From Propaganda Leaflets.
30: From the Great Zeppelin Raid, 31 January 1916.
31: From Face to Face With Kaiserism, James W. Gerard, 1918.
32: Topics for Written and Oral Discussion.
Notes.
Suggestions for Further Reading.
33: Aftermath: An Analysis of F. Scott Fitzgerald's Tender Is the Night (1935), Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway (1925), and Paul West's Love's Mansion (1992).
34: From Peace Treaty of Brest-Litovsk, 3 March 1918.
35: From the Armistice Demands, 11 November 1918.
36: From President Woodrow Wilson's Fourteen Points, 8 January 1918.
37: From Peace Treaty of Versailles, Articles 1-30 and Annex of the Covenant of the League of Nations, 28 June 1919.
38: From the Balfour Declaration, 1917.
39: Topics for Written and Oral Discussion.
Notes.
Suggestions for Further Reading.
About the Author.