Student's Guide to the Supreme Court, 1st Edition

  • David G. Savage
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1608712648
  • ISBN-13: 9781608712649
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 358 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2004 | Published/Released December 2010
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2004

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Specifically written to engage high-school students, Student’s Guide to the Supreme Court presents a comprehensive overview of the history, traditions, and people of the highest court in the land. This one-stop source does not require any prior knowledge of the Supreme Court and covers topics that meet national high school curriculum standards. Part One consists of three informative essays - The Supreme Court: The Weakest or the Strongest Branch? How Does the President Nominate a Supreme Court Justice? and Do They Matter? How Supreme Court Decisions Affect Modern American Life. Part Two is an alphabetical section of key words and legal concepts spanning abortion to writs of mandamus. The members of the current Roberts Court—including Sonia Sotomayor—are profiled here, as are all chief justices and notable associate justices. Part Three complements the first two sections with a generous sampling of influential primary source documents, including landmark decisions, excerpts from justices’ papers, political cartoons, and constitutional provisions related to the Supreme Court.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Other Frontmatter.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
List of Illustrations.
Reader’s Guide.
About the Advisory Editor.
Preface.
Historical Milestones of the U.S. Supreme Court, 1787–2009: A Timeline.
1: Essays.
2: The Supreme Court: The Weakest or Strongest Branch of Our Government?.
3: How Does the President Nominate a Supreme Court Justice?.
4: How Does the Supreme Court Affect Citizens Today?.
5: The Supreme Court A to Z.
6: Abortion, Constitutional Debate on.
7: Affirmative Action.
8: Aliens, Protection of.
9: Alito, Samuel A. (1950–).
10: Appellate Jurisdiction.
11: Articles of Confederation.
12: Associate Justices.
13: Automobile Searches.
14: Bail.
15: Baker v. Carr (1962).
16: Bankruptcy and Bankruptcy Laws.
17: Bill of Rights.
18: Bills of Attainder.
19: Brandeis, Louis D. (1856–1941).
20: Brennan, William Joseph Jr. (1906–1997).
21: Breyer, Stephen (1938–).
22: Brown v. Board of Education (1954).
23: Burger, Warren E. (1907–1995).
24: Burr, Aaron, Trial of.
25: Bush v. Gore (2000).
26: Censorship.
27: Checks and Balances.
28: Chief Justice of the United States.
29: Child Labor.
30: Circuit Court of Appeals.
31: Citizenship and Naturalization.
32: Civil Rights Act of 1964.
33: Civil Rights and the Supreme Court.
34: Civil Rights Cases (1883).
35: Confessions.
36: Confirmation of Justices and Judges.
37: Congress and the Supreme Court.
38: Constitution of the United States.
39: Contempt of Court.
40: Cruel and Unusual Punishment.
41: Cruzan v. Missouri Department of Health (1990).
42: Dartmouth College v. Woodward (1819).
43: Death Penalty Cases.
44: Declaratory Judgments.
45: Double Jeopardy.
46: Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857).
47: Due Process.
48: Electronic Eavesdropping.
49: Eminent Domain.
50: Engle v. Vitale (1962).
51: Equal Employment Opportunity.
52: Equal Protection of the Law.
53: Escobedo v. Illinois (1964).
54: Exclusionary Rule.
55: Ex Parte Milligan (1866).
56: Ex Post Facto Laws.
57: Fair Housing.
58: Federalism.
59: Field, Stephen Johnson (1816–1899).
60: Fiscal and Monetary Power and the Supreme Court.
61: Flag Burning.
62: Foreign Affairs and the Supreme Court.
63: Frankfurter, Felix (1882–1965).
64: Freedom of Assembly.
65: Freedom of Association.
66: Freedom of Religion.
67: Freedom of Speech.
68: Freedom of the Press.
69: Freedom to Petition.
70: Gag Rules.
71: Gibbons v. Ogden (1824).
72: Gideon v. Wainwright (1963).
73: Ginsburg, Ruth Bader (1933–).
74: Grandfather Clauses.
75: Griswold v. Connecticut (1965).
76: Harlan, John Marshall I (1833–1911).
77: Harlan, John Marshall II (1899–1971).
78: Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier (1988).
79: Heart of Atlanta Motel v. United States (1964).
80: Hill, Anita (1950–).
81: Holmes, Oliver Wendell Jr. (1841–1935).
82: Hughes, Charles Evans (1862–1948).
83: Impeachment of Justices.
84: Implied Powers.
85: Injunctions.
86: Interstate Relations.
87: Jay, John (1745–1829).
88: Judicial Restraint.
89: Judicial Review.
90: Judiciary Act of 1789.
91: Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court.
92: Juveniles, Rights of.
93: Kennedy, Anthony M. (1936–).
94: Korematsu v. United States (1944).
95: Legislative Veto.
96: Libel.
97: Line Item Veto.
98: Loving v. Virginia (1967).
99: Loyalty Oaths.
100: Mapp v. Ohio (1961).
101: Marbury v. Madison (1803).
102: Maritime and Admiralty Law.
103: Marshall, John (1755–1835).
104: Marshall, Thurgood (1908–1993).
105: McCulloch v. Maryland (1819).
106: Miranda v. Arizona (1966).
107: New Deal and the Supreme Court.
108: New York Times v. Sullivan (1964).
109: Obscenity.
110: O’Connor, Sandra Day (1930–).
111: One Person, One Vote.
112: Opinions.
113: Pentagon Papers.
114: Plessy v. Ferguson (1896).
115: Powell v. Alabama (1932).
116: Presidency and the Supreme Court.
117: Probable Cause.
118: Race and Redistricting.
119: Rehnquist, William H. (1924–2005).
120: Ricci v. DeStefano (2009).
121: Right to a Jury Trial.
122: Right to a Public Trial.
123: Right to a Speedy Trial.
124: Right to Die.
125: Right to Legal Counsel.
126: Right to Privacy.
127: Right to Vote.
128: Roberts, John G. (1955–).
129: Roe v. Wade (1973).
130: Roosevelt’s 1937 Court Reform Plan.
131: Salaries and Benefits of the Justices.
132: Scalia, Antonin (1936–).
133: School Prayer and Bible Readings.
134: Search Warrants.
135: Self-Incrimination.
136: Sex Discrimination.
137: Sit-Ins.
138: Slaughterhouse Cases (1873).
139: Slavery Issues.
140: Sotomayor, Sonia (1954–).
141: Souter, David (1939–).
142: Speech, Unprotected.
143: Stevens, John Paul (1920–).
144: Stop-and-Frisk Searches.
145: Story, Joseph (1779–1845).
146: Sturges v. Crowninshield (1819).
147: Supreme Court, History of the.
148: Supreme Court, Traditions of the.
149: Supreme Court Building.
150: Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg County Board of Education (1971).
151: Symbolic Speech.
152: Taft, William Howard (1857–1930).
153: Taney, Roger B. (1777–1864).
154: Term of the Supreme Court.
155: Thomas, Clarence (1948–).
156: Tinker v. Des Moines (1969).
157: United States v. Nixon (1974).
158: University of California Regents v. Bakke (1978).
159: U.S. District Courts.
160: Wallace v. Jaffree (1984).
161: War Power and the Supreme Court.
162: Warren, Earl (1891–1974).
163: White Primaries.
164: Writ of Habeas Corpus.
165: Writ of Mandamus.
166: Primary Source Library.
167: Judiciary Act, Chapter XX, Sections 1–4, 9, 11, 14, 1789.
168: Marbury v. Madison, 1803.
169: Dartmouth College v. Woodward, 1819.
170: McCulloch v. Maryland, 1819.
171: Sturges v. Crowninshield, 1819.
172: Supreme Court Chamber, 1860–1935.
173: Gibbons v. Ogden, 1824.
174: Circuit Court of Appeals Act, Sections 2, 3, and 4, 1891.
175: Plessy v. Ferguson, 1896.
176: Uncle Sam Anti-Alien Cartoon, 1918.
177: The Justices and the Building, 1929.
178: Korematsu v. United States, 1944.
179: Brown v. Board of Education, 1954.
180: The Supreme Court and the Communist Threat, 1951.
181: Ad from The New York Times, 1960.
182: Baker v. Carr, 1962.
183: Gideon v. Wainwright, 1963.
184: Escobedo v. Illinois, 1964.
185: New York Times v. Sullivan, 1964.
186: Miranda v. Arizona, 1966.
187: Loving v. Virginia, 1967.
188: Tinker v. Des Moines, 1969.
189: From the Harry A. Blackmun Papers, 1970.