Green Consumerism: An A-to-Z Guide, 1st Edition

  • Published By: SAGE
  • ISBN-10: 1412973805
  • ISBN-13: 9781412973809
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 525 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2010 | Published/Released July 2011
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2010

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Via 150 signed entries, Green Consumerism: An A to Z Guide offers a wide ranging examination of green consumerism, one reflecting the diversity of views and debates surrounding the concept. The multiplicity of topics and disciplinary perspectives provides a useful survey of the nature of green consumerism, the forms it takes, the issues impacting it, and the practices it involves. Contributing authors also provide insights into the social and spacial constitution of green consumerism, its multifaceted and sometimes contested contours, and the ways it is embedded and shaped in relation to wider cultural, economic, political and environmental processes. Readers will derive a sense not only of what green consumerism has become, but more critically, how it might evolve, addressing both limitations and possibilities for real and meaningful change. Vivid photographs, searchable hyperlinks, numerous cross references, an extensive resource guide, and a clear, accessible writing style make the Green Society volumes ideal for classroom use as well as for research.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
About the Editors.
Introduction.
Reader's Guide.
List of Articles.
List of Contributors.
Green Consumerism Chronology.
1: Adhesives.
2: Advertising.
3: Affluenza.
4: Air Travel.
5: Apparel.
6: Audio Equipment.
7: Automobiles.
8: Baby Products.
9: Beverages.
10: Biodegradability.
11: Books.
12: Bottled Beverages (Water).
13: Carbon Credits.
14: Carbon Emissions.
15: Carbon Offsets.
16: Car Washing.
17: Certification Process.
18: Certified Products (Fair Trade or Organic).
19: Cleaning Products.
20: Coffee.
21: Commodity Fetishism.
22: Commuting.
23: Composting.
24: Computers and Printers.
25: Confections.
26: Conspicuous Consumption.
27: Consumer Activism.
28: Consumer Behavior.
29: Consumer Boycotts.
30: Consumer Culture.
31: Consumer Ethics.
32: Consumerism.
33: Consumer Society.
34: Cosmetics.
35: Dairy Products.
36: Demographics.
37: Diderot Effect.
38: Disparities in Consumption.
39: Disposable Plates and Plastic Implements.
40: Downshifting.
41: Dumpster Diving.
42: Durability.
43: Ecolabeling.
44: Ecological Footprint.
45: Ecotourism.
46: Electricity Usage.
47: Energy Efficiency of Products and Appliances.
48: Environmentalism.
49: Environmentally Friendly.
50: Ethically Produced Products.
51: E-Waste.
52: Fair Trade.
53: Fashion.
54: Final Consumption.
55: Finance and Economics.
56: Fish.
57: Floor and Wall Coverings.
58: Food Additives.
59: Food Miles.
60: Frugality.
61: Fuel.
62: Funerals.
63: Furniture.
64: Gardening/Growing.
65: Garden Tools and Appliances.
66: Genetically Modified Products.
67: Gifting (Green Gifts).
68: Government Policy and Practice (Local and National).
69: Grains.
70: Green Communities.
71: Green Consumer.
72: Green Consumerism Organizations.
73: Green Design.
74: Green Discourse.
75: Green Food.
76: Green Gross Domestic Product.
77: Green Homes.
78: Green Marketing.
79: Green Politics.
80: Greenwashing.
81: Healthcare.
82: Heating and Cooling.
83: Home Appliances.
84: Home Shopping and Catalogs.
85: Homewares.
86: Insulation.
87: International Regulatory Frameworks.
88: Internet Purchasing.
89: Kyoto Protocol.
90: Lawns and Landscaping.
91: Leisure and Recreation.
92: Lifestyle, Rural.
93: Lifestyle, Suburban.
94: Lifestyle, Sustainable.
95: Lifestyle, Urban.
96: Lighting.
97: Linen and Bedding.
98: Local Exchange Trading Schemes.
99: Locally Made.
100: Magazines.
101: Malls.
102: Markets (Organic/Farmers).
103: Materialism.
104: Meat.
105: Mobile Phones.
106: Morality (Consumer Ethics).
107: Needs and Wants.
108: Organic.
109: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).
110: Overconsumption.
111: Packaging and Product Containers.
112: Paper Products.
113: Personal Products.
114: Pesticides and Fertilizers.
115: Pets.
116: Pharmaceuticals.
117: Plants.
118: Positional Goods.
119: Poultry and Eggs.
120: Poverty.
121: Pricing.
122: Production and Commodity Chains.
123: Product Sharing.
124: Psychographics.
125: Public Transportation.
126: Quality of Life.
127: Recyclable Products.
128: Recycling.
129: Regulation.
130: Resource Consumption and Usage.
131: Seasonal Products.
132: Secondhand Consumption.
133: Services.
134: Shopping.
135: Shopping Bags.
136: Simple Living.
137: Slow Food.
138: Social Identity.
139: Solid and Human Waste.
140: Sports.
141: Supermarkets.
142: Super Rich.
143: Sustainable Consumption.
144: Swimming Pools and Spas.
145: Symbolic Consumption.
146: Taxation.
147: Tea.
148: Television and DVD Equipment.
149: Tools.
150: Toys.
151: United Nations Human Development Report 1998.
152: Vege-Box Schemes.
153: Vegetables and Fruits.
154: Waste Disposal.
155: Water.
156: Websites and Blogs.
157: Windows.
Green Consumerism Glossary.
Green Consumerism Resource Guide.
Green Consumerism Appendix.
Index.