Geographic Information Systems And Crime Analysis, 1st Edition

  • Fahui Wang
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 159140455X
  • ISBN-13: 9781591404552
  • DDC: 363.25
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 345 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2005 | Published/Released December 2011
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2005

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About

Overview

This book features a diverse array of GIS applications in crime analysis, from general issues such as GIS as a communication process and inter-jurisdictional data sharing to specific applications in tracking serial killers and predicting juvenile violence.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Title page.
Copyright Page.
Geographic Information Systems and Crime Analysis.
Preface.
Acknowledgments.
1: GIS and Data Sharing.
2: GIS as a Communication Process: Experiences from the Milwaukee COMPASS Project.
3: Interjurisdictional Law Enforcement Data Sharing Issues: Benefits of the Use of Geo-Spatial Technologies and Barriers to More Widespread Cooperation.
4: Data Issues in Crime Studies.
5: Garbage In, Garbage Out: Geocoding Accuracy and Spatial Analysis of Crime.
6: Disaggregating the Journey to Homicide.
7: Constructing Geographic Areas for Analysis of Homicide in Small Populations: Testing Herding-Culture-of-Honor Proposition.
8: Geographic Profiling.
9: Geographic Profiling for Serial Crime Investigation.
10: Single Incident Geographical Profiling.
11: Geographic Profiling and Spatial Analysis of Serial Homicides.
12: Crime Monitoring and Tracking.
13: Geographic Surveillance of Crime Frequencies in Small Areas.
14: Application of Tracking Signals to Detect Time Series Pattern Changes in Crime Mapping Systems.
15: Integrating GIS, GPS and MIS on the Web: EMPACT in Florida.
16: New Methods and Technologies.
17: Simulating Crime Events and Crime Patterns in a RA/CA Model.
18: Integrating GIS and Maximal Covering Models to Determine Optimal Police Patrol Areas.
19: Web GIS for Mapping Community Crime Rates: Approaches and Challenges.
20: Identifying “Hot Link” between Crime and Crime-Related Locations.
21: Remote Sensing and Spatial Statistics as Tools in Crime Analysis.
22: Crime and Community Characteristics.
23: Routine Activities of Youth and Neighborhood Violence: Spatial Modeling of Place, Time, and Crime.
24: Measuring Crime in and around Public Housing Using GIS.
About the Authors.
Index.