The Scientific Revolution and the Foundations of Modern Science, 1st Edition

  • Wilbur Applebaum
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 0313061254
  • ISBN-13: 9780313061257
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 243 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2005 | Published/Released September 2007
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2005

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Explains how the pursuit of natural philosophy from about 1500 to 1700 created the foundation of modern science. Discusses how the profound changes in the study of the natural world in this period was made possible by social and cultural changes occurring Western Europe. Details the ideas and practices of key figures, the concepts they overcame, and the nature of the institutions within which they worked.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Recent Titles in Greenwood Guides to Historic Events, 1500–1900.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Other Frontmatter.
Contents.
Illustrations.
Series Foreword.
Introduction.
Chronology of Events.
1: Historical Overview.
2: Astronomy and the Cosmos.
3: Matter, Motion, and the Mathematical Sciences.
4: The Nature of Living Things.
5: New Methods for the Advancement of Knowledge.
6: Religion and Natural Philosophy.
7: Influence of the Scientific Revolution.
8: Biographies.
9: Bacon, Francis (1561–1626).
10: Boyle, Robert (1627–1691).
11: Brahe, Tycho (1546–1601).
12: Copernicus, Nicolaus (1473–1543).
13: Descartes, René (1596–1650).
14: Galilei, Galileo (1564–1642).
15: Gassendi, Pierre (1592–1655).
16: Gilbert, William (1544–1603).
17: Harvey, William (1578–1657).
18: Hooke, Robert (1635–1703).
19: Huygens, Christiaan (1629–1695).
20: Kepler, Johannes (1571–1630).
21: Malpighi, Marcello (1628–1694).
22: Newton, Isaac (1642–1727).
23: Paracelsus (c. 1493–1541).
24: Vesalius, Andreas (1514–1564).
Primary Documents.
25: Traditional Natural Philosophy.
26: Aristotelianism.
27: The Transformation of Cosmology and Astronomy.
28: Copernicus on the Nature of and Reasons for His Astronomical Theory.
29: Kepler and the Creation of a New Astronomy.
30: The Role of the Telescope in Challenging the Aristotelian Cosmos.
31: The Reform of the Medical Sciences.
32: Alchemy, the Nature of Matter, and Medical Practice.
33: Vesalius on the Reform of Medicine.
34: Harvey and the Circulation of the Blood.
35: New Methods for the Development of Natural Philosophy.
36: Francis Bacon.
37: René Descartes.
38: The Nature, Outlook, and Methods of the Royal Society.
39: Appropriate Methods in Natural Philosophy as Seen at the End of the Seventeenth Century.
40: Experiment and Measurement in Natural Philosophy.
41: Magnetic Experiments and Celestial Motion.
42: The Reformation of Mechanics.
43: Experiment, Measurement, and the Vacuum.
44: Newton on the Laws of Motion and the Principle of Universal Gravitation.
45: The Nature of the Universe and Its Laws as Arguments for Design by a Creator.
Glossary.
Annotated Bibliography.
Index.
About the Author.
Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Recent Titles in Greenwood Guides to Historic Events, 1500–1900.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Other Frontmatter.
Contents.
Illustrations.
Series Foreword.
Introduction.
Chronology of Events.
1: Historical Overview.
2: Astronomy and the Cosmos.
3: Matter, Motion, and the Mathematical Sciences.
4: The Nature of Living Things.
5: New Methods for the Advancement of Knowledge.
6: Religion and Natural Philosophy.
7: Influence of the Scientific Revolution.
8: Biographies.
9: Bacon, Francis (1561–1626).
10: Boyle, Robert (1627–1691).
11: Brahe, Tycho (1546–1601).
12: Copernicus, Nicolaus (1473–1543).
13: Descartes, René (1596–1650).
14: Galilei, Galileo (1564–1642).
15: Gassendi, Pierre (1592–1655).
16: Gilbert, William (1544–1603).
17: Harvey, William (1578–1657).
18: Hooke, Robert (1635–1703).
19: Huygens, Christiaan (1629–1695).
20: Kepler, Johannes (1571–1630).
21: Malpighi, Marcello (1628–1694).
22: Newton, Isaac (1642–1727).
23: Paracelsus (c. 1493–1541).
24: Vesalius, Andreas (1514–1564).
Primary Documents.
25: Traditional Natural Philosophy.
26: Aristotelianism.
27: The Transformation of Cosmology and Astronomy.
28: Copernicus on the Nature of and Reasons for His Astronomical Theory.
29: Kepler and the Creation of a New Astronomy.
30: The Role of the Telescope in Challenging the Aristotelian Cosmos.
31: The Reform of the Medical Sciences.
32: Alchemy, the Nature of Matter, and Medical Practice.
33: Vesalius on the Reform of Medicine.
34: Harvey and the Circulation of the Blood.
35: New Methods for the Development of Natural Philosophy.
36: Francis Bacon.
37: René Descartes.
38: The Nature, Outlook, and Methods of the Royal Society.
39: Appropriate Methods in Natural Philosophy as Seen at the End of the Seventeenth Century.
40: Experiment and Measurement in Natural Philosophy.
41: Magnetic Experiments and Celestial Motion.
42: The Reformation of Mechanics.
43: Experiment, Measurement, and the Vacuum.
44: Newton on the Laws of Motion and the Principle of Universal Gravitation.
45: The Nature of the Universe and Its Laws as Arguments for Design by a Creator.
Glossary.
Annotated Bibliography.
Index.
About the Author.