Student's Guide to the U.S.Elections, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 160426702X
  • ISBN-13: 9781604267020
  • DDC: 324.60973
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 416 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2008 | Published/Released January 2010
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2008

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Student's Guide to Elections is an informative and engaging reference tool for young researchers seeking information on voting, the electoral process, and the history of U.S. elections. It offers accessible access to the key topics in high school U.S. government and U.S. history curricula. A comprehensive, single-volume resource, it features essays, encyclopedic entries, and primary source documents, to help students understand the history and significance of the U.S. electoral process. The user-friendly design includes boxed features, time lines, photos, maps, charts, tables, and political cartoons.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Other Front Matter.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
List of Illustrations.
Reader’S Guide.
About the Advisory Editor.
Preface.
Historical Milestones of U.S. Elections, 1787–2007: a Timeline.
1: Could a Candidate Win the Most Votes and Still Lose the Election?.
2: What is the Role of Political Parties? Are They Even Necessary?.
3: Majority Rule vs. Minority Rights: What Makes America Democratic?.
4: Absentee Voting.
5: African American Voters.
6: African Americans in Congress.
7: American Independent Party (1968– ) and American Party (1972– ).
8: Anti-Federalists (1789–1796).
9: Anti-Masonic Party (1828–1836).
10: Baker v. Carr (1962).
11: Bill of Rights.
12: Buckley v. Valeo (1976).
13: Bush v. Gore (2000).
14: Campaign Finance.
15: Caucus System.
16: Census.
17: Communist Party (1919– ).
18: Conservative Party (1962– ).
19: Constitution of the United States.
20: Constitutional Convention.
21: Constitutional Union Party (1860).
22: Democratic Party (1828– ).
23: Democratic-Republican Party (1792–1828).
24: Dixiecrats (States’ Rights Party) (1948).
25: Election Day.
26: Election of 1789: George Washington.
27: Election of 1792: George Washington.
28: Election of 1796: John Adams.
29: Election of 1800: Thomas Jefferson.
30: Election of 1804: Thomas Jefferson.
31: Election of 1808: James Madison.
32: Election of 1812: James Madison.
33: Election of 1816: James Monroe.
34: Election of 1820: James Monroe.
35: Election of 1824: John Quincy Adams.
36: Election of 1828: Andrew Jackson.
37: Election of 1832: Andrew Jackson.
38: Election of 1836: Martin Van Buren.
39: Election of 1840: William Henry Harrison.
40: Election of 1844: James K. Polk.
41: Election of 1848: Zachary Taylor.
42: Election of 1852: Franklin Pierce.
43: Election of 1856: James Buchanan.
44: Election of 1860: Abraham Lincoln.
45: Election of 1864: Abraham Lincoln.
46: Election of 1868: Ulysses S. Grant.
47: Election of 1872: Ulysses S. Grant.
48: Election of 1876: Rutherford B. Hayes.
49: Election of 1880: James A. Garfield.
50: Election of 1884: Grover Cleveland.
51: Election of 1888: Benjamin Harrison.
52: Election of 1892: Grover Cleveland.
53: Election of 1896: William McKinley.
54: Election of 1900: William McKinley.
55: Election of 1904: Theodore Roosevelt.
56: Election of 1908: William Howard Taft.
57: Election of 1912: Woodrow Wilson.
58: Election of 1916: Woodrow Wilson.
59: Election of 1920: Warren G. Harding.
60: Election of 1924: Calvin Coolidge.
61: Election of 1928: Herbert Hoover.
62: Election of 1932: Franklin D. Roosevelt.
63: Election of 1936: Franklin D. Roosevelt.
64: Election of 1940: Franklin D. Roosevelt.
65: Election of 1944: Franklin D. Roosevelt.
66: Election of 1948: Harry S. Truman.
67: Election of 1952: Dwight D. Eisenhower.
68: Election of 1956: Dwight D. Eisenhower.
69: Election of 1960: John F. Kennedy.
70: Election of 1964: Lyndon B. Johnson.
71: Election of 1968: Richard M. Nixon.
72: Election of 1972: Richard M. Nixon.
73: Election of 1976: Jimmy Carter.
74: Election of 1980: Ronald Reagan.
75: Election of 1984: Ronald Reagan.
76: Election of 1988:.
77: Election of 1992: William Jefferson Clinton.
78: Election of 1996: William Jefferson Clinton.
79: Election of 2000: George W. Bush.
80: Election of 2004: George W. Bush.
81: Election of 2008: Campaigns.
82: Elections, Congressional.
83: Elections, Gubernatorial.
84: Elections, House of Representatives.
85: Elections, Presidential.
86: Elections, Senate.
87: Electoral College.
88: Faithless Electors.
89: Federalism.
90: Federalist Party (1792–1816).
91: Fifteenth Amendment (1870).
92: Free Soil Party (1848–1852).
93: Gerrymandering.
94: Green Party (1996– ).
95: Greenback Party (1874–1884).
96: Hispanic Voters.
97: Hispanics in Congress.
98: Impeachment and Removal, Gubernatorial.
99: Impeachment, Presidential.
100: Incumbency.
101: Interest Groups.
102: Know Nothing (American) Party (1856).
103: League of Women Voters.
104: Liberal Party (1944– ).
105: Libertarian Party (1971– ).
106: Liberty Party (1828–1836).
107: Literacy Tests.
108: Majority Rule.
109: Motor-Voter Registration.
110: National Unity Party (1980–1988).
111: Natural Law Party (1992–2004).
112: New Alliance Party (1988–1992).
113: Nineteenth Amendment (1920).
114: Nominating Conventions.
115: One Person, One Vote.
116: PACs: Political Action Committees.
117: Party Platforms.
118: Peace and Freedom Party (1967– ).
119: People’s Party (1971– ).
120: Political Parties, Development and Role of.
121: Poll Tax.
122: Populist Party (1891–1908).
123: Presidential Debates.
124: Primary Elections, Presidential.
125: Progressive (Bull Moose) Party (1912).
126: Progressive Party (La Follette) (1924).
127: Progressive Party (Wallace) (1948).
128: Reapportionment and Redistricting.
129: Reform Party (1992– ).
130: Republican Party (1854– ).
131: Separation of Powers.
132: Seventeenth Amendment (1913).
133: Socialist Party (1901– ).
134: Socialist Workers Party (1938– ).
135: Special Elections, House of Representatives.
136: Special Elections, Senate.
137: Super Tuesday and Regional Primaries.
138: Term Limits.
139: Third Parties.
140: Twelfth Amendment (1804).
141: Twentieth Amendment (1933).
142: Twenty-Fifth Amendment (1967).
143: Twenty-Fourth Amendment (1964).
144: Twenty-Second Amendment (1951).
145: Twenty-Sixth Amendment (1971).
146: U.S. Labor Party (1973– ).
147: Voter Registration.
148: Voters, Voting Behavior, and Voter Turnout.
149: Voting Rights Act of 1965, the.
150: Voting Systems.
151: Watergate.
152: Whig Party (1834–1856).
153: Women in Congress.
154: Women Voters.
155: ZZZ.
156: United States Constitution, Article I, Section 4, 1789.
157: United States Constitution, Article II, Section 1, 1789.
158: United States Constitution, Article II, Section 3, 1789.
159: George Washington’s Farewell Address, 1796.
160: Twelfth Amendment, 1804.
161: First Use of the Democratic Donkey, 1828.
162: Presidential Campaign Banner, 1872.
163: First Use of the Republican Elephant, 1874.
164: Speech After Being Convicted for Voting in the 1872 Presidential Election, 1873.
165: Samuel Tilden’S Speech, 1877.
166: Populist Party Platform, 1892.
167: Cross of Gold Speech, 1896.
168: Seventeenth Amendment, 1913.
169: Nineteenth Amendment, 1920.
170: Commemorative Presidential Campaign Stamp, 1924.
171: Franklin D. Roosevelt’S First Inaugural Address, March 20, 1933.
172: Twentieth Amendment, 1933.
173: Chicago Daily Tribune Headline “Dewey Defeats Truman,” 1948.
174: Twenty-Second Amendment, 1951.
175: Richard M. Nixon’s “Checkers” Speech, 1952.
176: 1950s Commemorative G.O.P. Handkerchief.
177: Give Us the Ballot, We will Transform the South,” 1957.
178: Inaugural Address, John F. Kennedy, January 20, 1961.
179: Baker V. Carr, 1962.
180: Twenty-Fourth Amendment, 1964.
181: Twenty-Fifth Amendment, 1967.
182: Lyndon B. Johnson’S the American Promise, March 15, 1965.
183: Voting Rights Act of 1965.
184: Lyndon B. Johnson Announces that He is Not a Presidential Candidate, March 31, 1968.
185: Twenty-Sixth Amendment, 1971.
186: Buckley V. Valeo, 1976.
187: Contract with America, 1994.
188: George W. Bush, Et Al., Petitioners, V. Albert Gore, Jr., Et Al., 2000.
189: Vice President Al Gore’s Concession Speech, December 13, 2000.