The Louisiana Purchase, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1604263709
  • ISBN-13: 9781604263701
  • DDC: 973.46
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 299 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2002 | Published/Released November 2009
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2002

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About

Overview

The Louisiana Purchase combines documents and analytical essays timed for the bicentennial year in 2003. This timely collection will explain: how and why the United States acquired the massive territory that more than doubled the size of the country, the profound social and political changes that came in the wake of the Purchase, its impact on such far reaching topics like the Constitution, slavery, federalism, political behavior, nation building, transportation, the media, and global affairs, how major historical figures like Thomas Jefferson, Aaron Burr, and James Madison, were influenced by the Purchase.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Landmark Events in U.S. History Series.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
List of Documents.
Preface.
Contributors.
Louisiana Purchase—Map.
Introduction: Framing an Endless Purchase.
Building a New Nation: American Politics in a Revolutionary Age.
Children of Empire or Concitoyens? Louisiana's French Inhabitants.
Public Perception and Public Events: The Louisiana Purchase and the American Partisan Press.
Thomas Jefferson and the Problem of World Politics.
The Burr Conspiracy and the Problem of Western Loyalty.
Dehahuit and the Question of Change in North America.
Edward Livingston and the Problem of Law.
The Louisiana Purchase as Seminal Constitutional Event.
The Louisiana Purchase and American Federalism.
Empire of Liberty, Empire of Slavery: The Louisiana Territories and the Fate of American Bondage.
1: Documents.
2: Introduction to the Documents.
Section I (Documents 1–3): The Louisiana Purchase.
3: Treaty Between the United States of America and the French Republic.
Convention Between the United States of America and the French Republic.
Convention Between the United States of America and the French Republic.
Section II (Documents 4–23): Building a Consensus.
Virginia as a Model for an Emerging Nation.
Letter from James Madison to Thomas Jefferson, August 20, 1784.
Letter from Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, January 30, 1787.
Comments of Gouverneur Morris at the Constitutional Convention, July 13, 1787.
From Proceedings at the Constitutional Convention, August 28, 1787.
Federalist No. 3.
Federalist No. 15.
Letter from Rufus King to James Madison, March 29, 1801.
Letter from Thomas Jefferson to Robert R. Livingston, April 18, 1802.
Letter from Thomas Jefferson to Pierre Samuel Du Pont de Nemours, April 25, 1802.
Letter from James Madison to Carlos Martinez de Yrujo, November 25, 1802.
Letter from Robert R. Livingston to James Madison, November 10, 1802.
William Duane on the Mississippi Question.
Letter from Charles Pinckney to James Madison, May 4, 1803.
Alexander Hamilton on the Louisiana Purchase.
Letter from James Madison to Robert R. Livingston and James Monroe, March 2, 1803.
Letter from Thomas Jefferson to James Madison, March 19, 1803.
Letter from Robert R. Livingston and James Monroe to James Madison, May 13, 1803.
Letter from James Madison to Robert R. Livingston and James Monroe, July 29, 1803.
Letter from Thomas Jefferson to Joseph Priestley, January 29, 1804.
Section III (Documents 24–31): Building a Coalition.
Letter from Thomas Jefferson to John Breckinridge, August 12, 1803.
Jefferson, Draft Constitutional Amendments, 1803.
Congressional Debate over the Louisiana Purchase and the Governance Act of 1804.
Taking Possession of the Territories.
Thomas Jefferson's Third Annual Message as President, October 17, 1803.
Samuel Brazer's Pamphlet Commemorating the Cession of Louisiana to the United States, May 12, 1804.
Defining Louisiana.
Poetic Explanation of the Louisiana Purchase.
Section IV (Documents 32–54): Building a Government.
The 1804 Governance Act.
Remonstrance of the People of Louisiana Against the Political System Adopted by Congress for Them, May 1804.
The 1805 Governance Act.
The 1812 Governance Act for the Territory of Missouri.
William C. C. Claiborne Proclamation, December 20, 1803.
Letter from William C. C. Claiborne to James Madison, December 27, 1803.
Address from the Free People of Color, January 1804.
Indians' Speech to Thomas Jefferson and Henry Dearborn, January 4, 1806.
Dehahuit to William C. C. Claiborne, September 5, 1806.
Thomas Jefferson's Speech to the Wolf and People of the Mandan Nation, December 30, 1806.
Territorial Legislature to Congress, March 12, 1810.
Congressional Debate over Louisiana Statehood.
Forming a Constitution and State Government in the Territory of Orleans, February 20, 1811.
The Louisiana Constitution of 1812.
Admitting the State of Louisiana into the Union, April 8, 1812.
Congress Debates Missouri Statehood.
Forming a Constitution and State Government in the Territory of Missouri, March 6, 1820.
The Missouri Constitution of 1820.
The Qualified Admission of the State of Missouri into the Union, March 2, 1821.
Letter from James Madison to William C. C. Claiborne, November 18, 1805.
Letter from James Monroe to John Quincy Adams, December 10, 1815.
Letter from James Monroe to Thomas Jefferson, May 1820.
The Transcontinental Treaty.
Section V (Documents 55–63): Building a Map.
Population Estimates for Louisiana, 1803.
Alexandria Advertiser, December 18, 1803.
Another Rumor.
Letter from Thomas Jefferson to Meriwether Lewis, June 20, 1803.
Letter from Thomas Jefferson to Meriwether Lewis, November 16, 1803.
Letter from Meriwether Lewis to Thomas Jefferson, September 23, 1806.
Census Returns.
The Louisiana Purchase and Native Americans.
Andrew Jackson, First Annual Message, December 8, 1830.
Section VI (Documents 64–67): Building a Memory.
Thomas Jefferson, the Louisiana Purchase, and National Pride.
James Monroe on the Louisiana Purchase.
Theodore Roosevelt on the American West.
Woodrow Wilson on American Political Leadership.
Index.