Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology, 2nd Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1605660272
  • ISBN-13: 9781605660271
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 4500 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2008 | Published/Released January 2009
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2008

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About

Overview

Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology is the first work to map this ever-changing field. It is the most comprehensive, research-based encyclopedia consisting of contributions from over 900 noted researchers in over 50 countries. This five-volume encyclopedia includes more than 550 articles highlighting current concepts, issues and emerging technologies. These articles are enhanced by special attention that is paid to over 5,000 technical and managerial terms. These terms will each have a 5-50 word description that allow the users of this extensive research source to learn the language and terminology of the field. In addition, this eBook offer a thorough reference section with over 11,500 sources of information that can be accessed by scholars, students, and researchers in the field of information science and technology.

These wide-ranging, user-friendly alphabetically organized volumes are an important addition for your library collection. Key features include:

  • Hundreds of research contributions from leading scholars from all over the world on all aspects of information science and technologies
  • A compendium of over 5,000 terms, definitions and explanations of concepts, processes and acronyms
  • Comprehensive coverage of critical issues related to utilization and management of information science and technologies
  • Thousands of comprehensive references on existing literature of all research on information science and technologies
  • Organized by topic and indexed, making it a convenient method of reference for all IT/IS scholars and professionals
  • Cross referencing of key terms, figures and information pertinent to Information Science and Technology

Originally published in print format in 2005.

Additional Product Information

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Editorial Advisory Board.
List of Contributors.
Contents by Category.
Contents by Volume.
Preface.
Acknowledgment.
About the Editor.
1: Accessibility of Online Library Information for People with Disabilities.
2: Introduction.
3: Coverage of Online Accessibility in the Library Literature.
4: Empirical Research Findings.
5: Accessibility Policies.
6: Future Trends.
7: Conclusion.
8: References.
9: Key Terms.
10: Actionable Knowledge Discovery.
11: Introduction.
12: Background.
13: Knowledge Actionability.
14: Key Components.
15: Intelligence Metasynthesis.
16: Future Trends.
17: Conclusion.
18: References.
19: Key Terms.
20: Active Patient Role in Recording Health Data.
21: Introduction.
22: Background.
23: Medical or Health Record.
24: Personal Health Record.
25: Current Status.
26: Electronic Health Record and Personal Health Record.
27: Content of the Electronic Health Record.
28: Characteristics of an Electronic Health Record.
29: Benefits of the Electronic Health Record.
30: Content of the Electronic Personal Health Record.
31: Future Trends.
32: Conclusion.
33: References.
34: Key Terms.
35: Actor-Network Theory Applied to Information Systems Research.
36: Introduction.
37: Background: Information Systems as a Socio-technical Discipline.
38: Qualitative Research Traditions in Information Systems.
39: ANT and Socio–technical Research.
40: How Actor-network Theory Handles Complexity.
41: Limitations and Criticisms of Actor-network Theory.
42: Future Trends.
43: Conclusion.
44: References.
45: Key Terms.
46: Adaptive Mobile Applications.
47: Introduction.
48: Background.
49: Adaptive Mobile Applications: Traditional Approaches.
50: Future Trends: Mobile Middleware.
51: Conclusion.
52: References.
53: Key Terms.
54: Adaptive Playout Buffering Schemes for Ip Voice Communication.
55: Introduction.
56: Background.
57: Adjusting Playout Delays.
58: Naylor and Kleinrock (1982).
59: Ramjee, Kurose, Towsley, and Schulzrinne (1994).
60: Moon, Kurose, and Towsley (1998).
61: Roccetti Et Al. (2001a).
62: The Need for Silent Intervals.
63: Future Trends.
64: Conclusion.
65: References.
66: Key Terms.
67: Addressing the Central Problem in Cyber Ethics Through Stories.
68: Introduction.
69: Background.
70: Narrative Vs. Logical Thinking.
71: The Role of Emotion in Reason.
72: Imagination and Possible Conse-quentialism.
73: Future Trends.
74: Conclusion.
75: References.
76: Key Terms.
77: Adoption of E-Commerce in SMEs.
78: Introduction.
79: Background: Adoption of E-commerce by an SME.
80: Innovation Translation.
81: Case Studies of Technology Adoption.
82: 1. Adoption of a Portal by a Storage and Transport Company.
83: 2. Adoption of Internet Technologies by a Rural Medical Practice.
84: 3. Adoption of Electronic Commerce by a Small Publishing Company.
85: 4. Non-adoption of E-commerce by a Small Chartered Accountancy Firm.
86: Future Trends: ANT and E-Commerce Innovation.
87: Conclusion.
88: References.
89: Key Terms.
90: Adoption of Electronic Commerce by Small Businesses.
91: Introduction.
92: Background.
93: Focus: Specific Difficulties for Small Businesses with E-commerce Adoption.
94: Future Trends.
95: Conclusion.
96: References.
97: Key Terms.
98: The Adoption of IS/IT Evaluation Methodologies in Australian Public Sector Organizations.
99: Introduction.
100: Background.
101: IS/IT Investment Evaluation and Benefits Realization.
102: An Integrated Approach.
103: Research Approach.
104: Case Description.
105: Case Study Results.
106: Issue 1: Lack of Formal IS/IT Investment Evaluation Methodology.
107: Issue 2: Lack of Understanding of IS/IT Investment Evaluation Methodology.
108: Issue 3: Existence of an Informal IS/IT Investment Evaluation Process.
109: Issue 4: Focus on Quantitative IS/IT Investment Evaluation Measures.
110: Issue 5: Different Motivations for Seeking External Expertise.
111: Issue 6: Success of the Contracts Perceived Differently by Stakeholders.
112: Issue 7: Embedded Contract Mentality.
113: Issue 8: Lack of User Involvement/participation in Contract Development.
114: Issue 9: General Lack of Commitment by Contractors.
115: Future Trends.
116: Conclusion.
117: References.
118: Key Terms.
119: Advanced Techniques for Object-based Image Retrieval.
120: Introduction.
121: Background.
122: Early Object-based Techniques in Content-based Image Retrieval.
123: Current Object-based Techniques in Content-based Image Retrieval.
124: Main Techniques for Object-based Image Retrieval.
125: A General Paradigm.
126: Techniques for Extracting Region of Interest.
127: Techniques for Identifying Objects.
128: Techniques for Matching Objects.
129: Techniques for (interactive) Feedback.
130: Future Trends.
131: Conclusion.
132: References.
133: Key Terms.
134: Advances in Tracking and Recognition of Human Motion.
135: Introduction.
136: Background.
137: Human Motion Tracking and 3D Pose Recovery.
138: Human Motion Recognition.
139: Applications.
140: Future Trends and Conclusion.
141: Acknowledgment.
142: References.
143: Key Terms.
144: Aesthetics in Software Engineering.
145: Introduction.
146: Background.
147: Aesthetics, Formality, and Software.
148: Importance of Aesthetics.
149: Formality and Aesthetics.
150: Embodiment and Software Aesthetics.
151: Future Trends.
152: Conclusion.
153: References.
154: Key Terms.
155: African-Americans and the Digital Divide.
156: Introduction.
157: Background.
158: Current Debates.
159: Technological and Social Perspectives on Access.
160: Asset-based and Behavioral Perspectives on Use.
161: Future Trends.
162: Conclusion.
163: References.
164: Key Terms.
165: Agent Technology.
166: Introduction.
167: Background: the Definition of Agenthood.
168: Current Agent Research: Multi-agent Systems.
169: Agent Theories.
170: Agent Construction: Design and Implementation.
171: Agent Applications.
172: Future Trends.
173: Conclusion.
174: References.
175: Key Terms.
176: Agent-based Negotiation in E-marketing.
177: Introduction.
178: Background.
179: Main Thrust of the Article.
180: A Multi-agent System.
181: What is Negotiation?.
182: Planning, Reasoning and Negotiation.
183: Future Trends.
184: Modeling E-market and E-auction.
185: Conclusion.
186: References.
187: Key Terms.
188: Agent-Oriented Software Engineering.
189: Introduction.
190: Background.