Encyclopedia of Communication Theory, 1st Edition

  • Stephen W. Littlejohn Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Published By: SAGE
  • ISBN-10: 1412959381
  • ISBN-13: 9781412959384
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 1192 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2009 | Published/Released October 2009
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2009

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

With more than 300 entries, these two volumes provide a one-stop source for a comprehensive overview of the communication theory field. The Encyclopedia of Communication Theory offers current descriptions of the theories that explain numerous aspects of communication and presents the background issues and concepts that comprise these theories. Focusing exclusively on communication theory, this is the first resource to summarize, in one place, the diversity of theory in the communication field. Key Themes:

  • Applications and Contexts
  • Critical Orientations
  • Cultural Orientations
  • Cybernetic and Systems Orientations
  • Feminist Orientations
  • Group and Organizational Concepts
  • Information, Media, and Communication Technology
  • International and Global Concepts
  • Interpersonal Concepts
  • Non-Western Orientations
  • Paradigms, Traditions, and Schools
  • Philosophical Orientations
  • Psycho-Cognitive Orientations
  • Rhetorical Orientations
  • Semiotic, Linguistic, and Discursive Orientations
  • Social/Interactional Orientations
  • Theory, Metatheory, Methodology, and Inquiry

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Editorial Board.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
List of Entries.
Reader’s Guide.
Theorists.
About the Editors and Editorial Board.
Contributors.
Introduction.
Chronology.
1: Accommodation Theory.
2: Accounts and Account Giving.
3: Action Assembly Theory.
4: Action-Implicative Discourse Analysis.
5: Activation Theory of Information Exposure.
6: Activity Theory.
7: Actor–Network Theory.
8: Advertising Theories.
9: Affect-Dependent Theory of Stimulus Arrangements.
10: Afrocentricity.
11: Agency.
12: Agenda-Setting Theory.
13: Americanization of Media.
14: Anxiety/Uncertainty Management Theory.
15: Archeology and Genealogy.
16: Argumentation Theories.
17: Argumentativeness, Assertiveness, and Verbal Aggressiveness Theory.
18: Asian Communication Theory.
19: Attachment Theory.
20: Attitude Theory.
21: Attribution Theory.
22: Audience Theories.
23: Autoethnography.
24: Axiology.
25: Black Feminist Epistemology.
26: Bona Fide Group Theory.
27: Broadcasting Theories.
28: Buddhist Communication Theory.
29: Campaign Communication Theories.
30: Chicana Feminism.
31: Chinese Harmony Theory.
32: Chronemics.
33: Citizenship.
34: Classical Rhetorical Theory.
35: Co-Cultural Theory.
36: Cognitive Dissonance Theory.
37: Cognitive Theories.
38: Collective Information Sampling.
39: Communibiology.
40: Communication Across the Life Span.
41: Communication and Language Acquisition and Development.
42: Communication Goal Theories.
43: Communication in Later Life.
44: Communication Skills Theories.
45: Communication Theory of Identity.
46: Communicative Action Theory.
47: Community.
48: Community of Practice.
49: Competence Theories.
50: Complexity and Communication.
51: Compliance Gaining Strategies.
52: Complicity Theory.
53: Computer-Mediated Communication.
54: Conflict Communication Theories.
55: Confucian Communication Theory.
56: Consequentiality of Communication.
57: Constitutive View of Communication.
58: Constructivism.
59: Contextual Theory of Interethnic Communication.
60: Convergence Theory.
61: Conversational Constraints Theory.
62: Conversation Analysis.
63: Coordinated Management of Meaning.
64: Co-Orientation Theory.
65: Corporate Campaign Theories.
66: Corporate Colonization Theory.
67: Creativity in Groups.
68: Critical Communication Pedagogy.
69: Critical Constructivism.
70: Critical Discourse Analysis.
71: Critical Ethnography.
72: Critical Organizational Communication.
73: Critical Race Theory.
74: Critical Rhetoric.
75: Critical Theory.
76: Cross-Cultural Adaptation Theory.
77: Cross-Cultural Communication.
78: Cross-Cultural Decision Making.
79: Cultivation Theory.
80: Cultural Contracts Theory.
81: Cultural Identity Theory.
82: Cultural Indicators.
83: Cultural Performance Theory.
84: Cultural Studies.
85: Cultural Theories of Health Communication.
86: Cultural Types Theories.
87: Culture and Communication.
88: Cybernetics.
89: Deception Detection.
90: Deconstruction.
91: Definitions of Communication.
92: Deliberative Democratic Theories.
93: Dialogue Theories.
94: Diaspora.
95: Diffusion of Innovations.
96: Digital Cultures.
97: Digital Divide.
98: Discourse Theory and Analysis.
99: Documentary Film Theories.
100: Dramatism and Dramatistic Pentad.
101: Dual-Level Connectionist Models of Group Cognition and Social Influence.
102: Dyadic Power Theory.
103: Effective Intercultural Workgroup Communication Theory.
104: Elaborated and Restricted Codes.
105: Elaboration Likelihood Theory.
106: Emotion and Communication.
107: Empathy.
108: Empiricism.
109: Entertainment–Education.
110: Environmental Communication Theories.
111: Epistemology.
112: Ethics Theories.
113: Ethnography of Communication.
114: Ethnomethodology.
115: Evaluating Communication Theory.
116: Existentialism.
117: Expectancy Violations Theory.
118: Face Negotiation Theory.
119: Facework Theories.
120: Family and Marital Schemas and Types.
121: Family Communication Theories.
122: Fans, Fandom, and Fan Studies.
123: Feminist Communication Theories.
124: Feminist Rhetorical Criticism.
125: Feminist Standpoint Theory.
126: Field Theory of Conflict.
127: Film Theories.
128: Flow and Contra-Flow.
129: Framing Theory.
130: Frankfurt School.
131: Free Flow Doctrine.
132: French Feminism.
133: Functional Group Communication Theory.
134: Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Theories.
135: Gender and Biology.
136: Gender and Media.
137: Genderlect Theory.
138: Gender Role Theory.
139: Gender Schema Theory.
140: General Semantics.
141: Genre Theory.
142: Globalization Theories.
143: Grounded Theory.
144: Group and Organizational Structuration Theory.
145: Group Communication Theories.
146: Groupthink.
147: Hawaiian Ho‘oponopono Theory.
148: Health Communication Theories.
149: Hermeneutics.
150: Heuristic-Systematic Model.
151: Hindu Communication Theory.
152: Humanistic Perspective.
153: Humorous Communication Theory.
154: Hybridity.
155: I and Thou.
156: Identification.
157: Identity Theories.
158: Ideological Rhetoric.
159: Ideology.
160: Immediacy.
161: Impression Formation.
162: Impression Management.
163: Indian Rasa Theory.
164: Information Theory.
165: Informatization.
166: Inoculation Theory.
167: Inquiry Processes.
168: Institutional Theories of Organizational Communication.
169: Interaction Adaptation Theory.
170: Interaction Involvement.
171: Interaction Process Analysis.
172: Intercultural Communication Competence.
173: Intercultural Communication Theories.
174: International Communication Theories.
175: International Development Theories.
176: Interpersonal Communication Theories.
177: Interpersonal Deception Theory.
178: Interpretive Communities Theory.
179: Interpretive Theory.
180: Interracial Communication.
181: Intersectionality.
182: Intrapersonal Communication Theories.
183: Invitational Rhetoric.

Meet the Author

Author Bio

Stephen W. Littlejohn

Stephen Littlejohn (Ph.D., University of Utah), is a conflict management consultant, mediator, facilitator, and trainer. He is consultant for the Public Dialogue Consortium and a partner in Domenici Littlejohn, Inc. Stephen is co-author of Moral Conflict: When Social Worlds Collide (Sage, 1997) and has written numerous other books and articles on communication and conflict. He was a professor of communication at Humboldt State University in California and is currently Adjunct Professor of Communication and Journalism at the University of New Mexico. He has done research on mediation and conflict management for 19 years and has been an active mediator for eight. Stephen has been a consultant for such clients as the Waco Youth Summit, the Alliance for Constructive Communication, the City of Cupertino, Columbia Basin College, and Washington State University.