Encyclopedia of Governance, 1st Edition

  • Editor: Mark Bevir
  • Published By: SAGE
  • ISBN-10: 1412939658
  • ISBN-13: 9781412939652
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • eBook
  • Original Copyright 2007 | Published/Released February 2007
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2007

  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

The encyclopedia provides a one-stop point of reference for the diverse and complex topics surrounding governance. It concentrates primarily on topics related to the changing nature and role of the state in recent times, and the ways in which these have been conceptualized. The relevant time period dates roughly from the collapse of the post-war consensus and the rise of neoliberal regimes in the 1970s. The changes in the state are those associated with, firstly, the transfer of powers, rights, and functions to organizations within civil society, and, secondly, the rise of new types of regional and international linkages and problems. The conceptual focus is on the ways in which these changes in the state are explored in political science, public administration, political economy, and sociology.

Governance refers, in particular, to changes in the nature and the role of the state since the last quarter of the twentieth century. The state has become both increasingly dependent on organizations in civil society and increasingly constrained by international linkages. On one hand, the public sector in many states has shifted toward markets and networks, as opposed to bureaucratic hierarchies: governance thus refers to the ways in which patterns of rule operate in and through groups within the voluntary and private sector. On the other, states have become increasingly embroiled with transnational and international settings as a result of the internationalization of industrial and financial transactions, the rise of regional blocks, and concerns over problems such as terrorism and the environment: governance thus refers to the formal and informal ways in which states have attempted to respond to the changing global order. The Encyclopedia of Governance unpacks the jargon that characterizes much writing in the field so as to make it intelligible to a wider public.

Originally published in print format in 2006.

Contributors

Contributors

  • Mark Bevir

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Editorial Board.
List of Entries.
Reader's Guide.
About the Editor.
Contributors.
Preface.
Introduction.
1: Accountability.
2: Action Research.
3: Adhocracy.
4: Adversarial Legalism.
5: Advocacy Networks.
6: African Governance.
7: Agency.
8: American Governance.
9: Anarchy.
10: Andean Community, Andean Pact.
11: Antiglobalization.
12: Arab Integration.
13: Arms Control.
14: Asian Financial Crisis.
15: Asian Governance.
16: Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation.
17: Association.
18: Association of Southeast Asian Nations.
19: Audit.
20: Australasian Governance.
21: Authoritarianism.
22: Authority.
23: Autopoiesis.
24: Baltic State Cooperation.
25: Bear Market.
26: Benchmarking.
27: Border Theory.
28: Bottom-Up Approach.
29: Bounded Rationality.
30: Bretton Woods.
31: Brokerage.
32: Budgetary Autonomy.
33: Bull Market.
34: Bureaucracy.
35: Bureaucratic Politics Approach.
36: Bureau Shaping.
37: Business Cycle.
38: Cairns Group.
39: Capacity Building.
40: Capitalism.
41: Capital Market Integration.
42: Caribbean Community.
43: Caribbean Governance.
44: Center-Local Relations.
45: Chiang Mai Agreement.
46: Citizen-Centric Government.
47: Citizenship.
48: City-Region.
49: Civic Capacity.
50: Civic Engagement.
51: Civic Republicanism.
52: Civic Virtue.
53: Civil Rights.
54: Civil Service.
55: Civil Society.
56: Clientelism.
57: Climate Change.
58: Clinical Governance.
59: Coalition.
60: Coercion.
61: Collaborative Governance.
62: Collaborative Planning.
63: Collaborative Problem Solving.
64: Collective Action.
65: Collective Wage Bargaining.
66: Collusion.
67: Commission on Global Governance.
68: Common But Differentiated Responsibilities.
69: Common Good.
70: Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa.
71: Common-Pool Resource.
72: Commonwealth of Independent States.
73: Communication.
74: Communicative Action.
75: Communicative Rationality.
76: Communism.
77: Communitarianism.
78: Community Organizing.
79: Competition Policy.
80: Competition State.
81: Competitiveness.
82: Complexity.
83: Compliance Cost.
84: Confederalism.
85: Confidence-Building Measure.
86: Conflict Mediation.
87: Confucian Governance.
88: Consensus Democracy.
89: Consent.
90: Consociationalism.
91: Constitutionalization.
92: Consumption.
93: Contract Enforcement.
94: Contracting Out.
95: Convergence and Divergence.
96: Cooperation.
97: Cooptation.
98: Coordinated Market Economy.
99: Coordination.
100: Core Executive.
101: Corporate Codes of Conduct.
102: Corporate Governance.
103: Corporatism.
104: Corruption.
105: Corruption Perceptions Index.
106: Cosmopolitanism.
107: Cost-Benefit Analysis.
108: Council for Mutual Economic Assistance.
109: Councils of Governments.
110: Crisis Management.
111: Critical Theory.
112: Culture Governance.
113: Cyberspace.
114: Data Protection.
115: Decentered Theory.
116: Decentralization.
117: Decision Making.
118: Deinstitutionalization.
119: Deliberative Democracy.
120: Democratic Deficit.
121: Democratic Theory.
122: Democratization.
123: Dependency.
124: Derivative.
125: Deterrence.
126: Development Assistance Committee.
127: Development Theory.
128: Devolution.
129: Dialogic Public Policy.
130: Differentiated Polity.
131: Dilemma.
132: Dirigisme.
133: Discourse.
134: Disintermediation.
135: Domestic Level Theories.
136: Due Process.
137: East Asian Economic Grouping.
138: Economic Community of West African States.
139: Economic Governance.
140: Economic Integration.
141: Economic Openness.
142: Economic Sociology.
143: Ecosystemic Approach.
144: E-Democracy.
145: Effectiveness.
146: Efficiency.
147: E-Government.
148: Elections.
149: Electronic Records.
150: Embeddedness.
151: Emergency Powers.
152: Empowerment.
153: Endangered Species Protection.
154: Environmental Governance.
155: Epistemic Community.
156: Equilibrium Theory.
157: Equity.
158: Ethical Consumerism.
159: Ethnic Groups.
160: Ethnonationalism.
161: European Coal and Steel Community.
162: European Free Trade Association.
163: European Governance.
164: European Union.
165: Evaluation Research.
166: Everyday Maker.
167: Evidence-Based Policy.
168: Exchange-Rate Regime.
169: Executive.
170: Export Processing Zones.
171: Externalities.
172: Failed State.
173: Feminist Theory.
174: Financial Market.
175: Fiscal Crisis.
176: Fiscal Federalism.
177: Fordism and Post-Fordism.
178: Forecasting.
179: Foreign Direct Investment.
180: Foreign Exchange Market.
181: Formal Organization.
182: Frame Analysis.
183: Freedom of Information.
184: Free Riding.
185: Free Trade Area of the Americas.
186: Functionalism.
187: Futures Market.
188: Game Theory.