Request for consultation

Thanks for your request. You’ll soon be chatting with a consultant to get the answers you need.
{{formPostErrorMessage.message}} [{{formPostErrorMessage.code}}]
First Name is required. 'First Name' must contain at least 0 characters 'First Name' cannot exceed 0 characters Please enter a valid First Name
Last Name is required. 'Last Name' must contain at least 0 characters 'Last Name' cannot exceed 0 characters Please enter a valid Last Name
Institution is required.
Discipline is required.
Why are you contacting us today? is required. 'Why are you contacting us today?' must contain at least 0 characters 'Why are you contacting us today?' cannot exceed 0 characters Please enter a valid Why are you contacting us today?

Native American Religions: An Introduction 2nd Edition

Sam Gill

  • Published
  • Previous Editions 1982
  • 160 Pages

Overview

Revised for the first time in over twenty years, this brief introduction to the religions of Native Americans provides an overview of the latest research and thought in this area. In writing the book, Gill aims to introduce an academically and humanistically useful way of trying to appreciate and understand the complexity and diversity of Native American religions, as well as establish them as a significant field within religious studies. In addition, aspects of European-American history are examined in a search for sources of widespread misunderstandings about the character of Native American religions.

Sam Gill, University of Colorado, Boulder

Sam Gill is professor of religious studies at the University of Colorado. His research interests include dance, movement and the body, play, and theoretical issues of comparative cultural studies. Many of his publications have focused on Native Americans and Australian Aborigines. His current cultural interests span the globe, but include especially Latin America and Indonesia.
Prologue.
1. The Place to Begin.
2. Nonliteracy and Native American Religions.
3. Symbols in Action.
4. Roads of Life.
5. Ways of Life.
6. Tradition and Change in Native American Religions.
7. Concluding Remarks.