CourseReader: Rhetorical Modes

  • Gale
  • ISBN-10: 1428273360
  • ISBN-13: 9781428273368
  • Mixed Media 
  • © 2013 | Published
 

About The Solution

Overview

COURSEREADER: RHETORICAL MODES is a fully customizable online reader which provides access to readings to complement your composition course. This easy-to-use solution allows you to select exactly the content you need to enhance your course, and is loaded with convenient features like highlighting, printing, and note-taking. Choose readings--all with permissions cleared-- illustrating rhetorical modes often covered in freshman composition courses: narration, illustration, description, process, definition, analysis, cause and effect, classification / division, comparison and contrast and argument. YOU have the freedom to assign individualized content at an affordable price. COURSEREADER: RHETORICAL MODES is the perfect complement to any composition class.


Features/Benefits

  • COURSEREADER: RHETORICAL MODES includes customizable and digital content for many courses across the curriculum so you can choose exactly what selections to assign your students.
  • Access to hundreds of readings, all with permissions cleared, allows you to tailor the content to fit your specific course needs.
  • Critical thinking questions are included for every reading. These questions prompt students to analyze what they have just read and are also excellent writing topics.
  • Pedagogical features include highlighting, printing, and note-taking for each selection, and the option of assigning due dates for each selection provide the support students need to succeed in the course.
  • You can add your own notes and highlighting to customize the reader to meet your students' varied learning styles.
  • Editor's Choice selections pulled together by Cengage authors provide a set of sources that best align with your Wadsworth text and are time-saving starting points for you to modify as you see fit.
  • You have the ability to search across multiple disciplines and include readings from other subject areas into your Reader.
  • "I think that the project reader is a great idea. I like the idea of picking your own topics to be included. I know that everyone emphasizes different areas in their classes and being able to tailor the reader to your specific interests is a definite plus." Jeff Carlisle, Oklahoma City Community College.
  • "COURSEREADER has the potential to revolutionize the teaching of courses. Primary sources are so often underused in the classroom simply because the readers are pricey or inaccessible. COURSEREADER gives me the ability to customize my reader with sources that I think are relevant and provocative without adding in text that, because unused, becomes mere filler. Brilliant!" Kenna Lang Archer, Texas Tech University.
  • "Exciting! May be a solution to our ongoing debate: cost vs. use." Jan McCauley, Tyler Junior College.
  • "I think this is one of the simplest and most straight-forward e-readers that I have seen. I'm particularly happy with what appears to be a streamlined search feature, and I really like the additional suggestions feature for each document." Carey Roberts, Arkansas Tech.

Table of Contents

ANALYSIS.
Shabbir Akhtar. "Twitter Subpoena Over WikiLeaks Goes Public. Facebook And Google Compromised?" This article analyzes the heated rhetoric which splashed across various media in the wake of Julian Assange's arrest and in response to the outcry regarding sensitive government documents leaked on his Wikileaks site.
Russell Baker. "From Robert Benchley to Andrew Dice Clay" Russell Bake, a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, political satirist, and humorist discusses the evolution of American humor in this article.
Stephen L. Carter. "Man of War" The author is renowned author of four bestselling novels and seven acclaimed non-fiction books, focusing on topics of politics, religion, and law; here he analyzes President Barack Obama's role and performance as commander-in-chief.
Michelle Davis. "Full-Time E-Learning Not Seen as Viable Option for Many; Does full-time virtual ed. exclude certain students?" In the following essay from Digital Directions, Davis analyzes both the viability and accessibility of online education for K–12.
Ziff Davis Associates. "Identity Takes on New Meaning" This article discusses digital identity and how the integration of social networks can lead to advantages and disadvantages.
Paul Demko. "Campaigns find creative ways to target voters on the Net" In this article first published in Saint Paul Legal Ledger Capitol Report, Demko analyzes the effectiveness of online political campaigning.
Stephen Jay Gould. "The Unfinished Revolution" Distinguished scientist in the fields of evolutionary biology and paleontology, beloved professor at Harvard and New York University, Stephen Jay Gould (1941-2002) also devoted his career to promoting public understanding of science and the history of ideas. Gould's lifelong engagement with Charles Darwin is reflected in this essay which sheds further light on both the contexts in which Darwin's ideas were formed and the ongoing story of their reception.
Agustin Gurza. "What's right with this picture? Young Latinos are changing the face of Catholic youth ministry" Gurza analyzes the changing cultural demographics of the Catholic Church, as well as the spiritual attitudes of American youth.
Todd Hutlock. "Healthcare Reform and what it means to healthcare design: voices from the field prognosticate on what's coming next" This article, first published in Healthcare Design Magazine, Hutlock analyzes the impact of healthcare reform on healthcare design.
Duane W. Layton. "Hoist with their own petard: how emerging markets use U.S. anti-dumping laws …against America" Layton , an attorney , has litigated numerous disputes before the WTO in Geneva, including the first two antidumping cases to come before the WTO; here he describes how other countries, especially China, are using the same dispute strategies, with the US as the target.
Janine McAdams. "Guerrilla tactics vs. old-boy network" In the following article, first published in Billboard, McAdams-Coveney analyzes the marketing of rap music.
Quentin Miller. "On the Road With the Final Four …Writers" Miller explains how he animated a sleepy literature class by mirroring the NCAA national basketball tournament format, commonly referred to as "March Madness."
James Perloff. "Allow Intelligence! Ben Stein's Expelled: No Intelligence allowed makes an intelligent case for pursuing the scientific evidence wherever it may lead – including even intelligent design" James Perloff, is an author who writes on issues of American culture and ethics reviews of the movie Expelled: No Intelligence Allowed.
Amy Tan. "What Your Closet Reveals About You" In the following article originally published in Harper's Bazaar magazine, Tan analyzes the way in which people's closets reflect--and at times guide--their lives.
J.K. Wall. Will Textbooks Be History? This essay was originally published as a front-page feature of the Indianapolis Business Journal near the end of 2010, raising timely questions about the future of college textbooks.
Todd Wilkinson. "Ancestral lands: native Americans seek to restore treaty rights to worship and hunt in many national parks." Author of the critically acclaimed Science Under Siege: The Politicians' War On Nature and Truth, Wilkinson analyzes the very complex issues involved in restoring land use rights to Native Americans.
Kate Williams. "We Are Fast Forgetting How to be Guilty about the Past" Kate Williams is an historian, author, and historical consultant for television and film and here she discusses how the holocaust has recently been portrayed in films.
ARGUMENT.
Shaunti Feldhahn and Diane Glass. "Woman to woman: men and reproductive rights: should fathers be held financially responsible for children born without their consent?" The authors are Harvard-educated feminists who wrote a syndicated newspaper column with weekly debates over particular social issues. In this essay, they take up the issue of the father's reproductive rights when the woman is pregnant without his consent.
Marilyn Flynn and Anthony Hassan. 'Unique challenges of war in Iraq and Afghanistan" In this Journal of Social Work Education article, they argue for additional training for health care professionals dealing with US veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts.
Ritchie C. Gabbei. "To be skilled or not to be skilled--that is the question" Gabbei discusses the necessity for physical education teachers to be skilled in the activities they teach.
Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. "The Next President's First Task: [A Manifesto]" Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., is an attorney specializing in environmental law and an environmental activist. In this essay, written during the presidential campaign of 2008, Kennedy laid out an energy agenda for the next president to follow.
Rick Lawhorn. 'Wikileaks: an experiment in failures" In this article, The author questions Wikileaks's motives and perceived value of disclosure and wonders if the disclosures are a result of a failure in information security or a failure of leadership.
Frank C. Polidora. "I remember, lest we forget" The author, an orthopedic surgeon, tells the story of his difficulties in treating his patients as individuals rather than line items in a spreadsheet.
Luc Sante. "Tourists and Torturers" Luc Sante is a writer, translator, and teacher and also teaches writing and photography at Bard College; here he discusses the photographs taken of torture victims at Abu Ghraib.
Salil Shetty. "The Global Movement to Kill the Death Penalty" The article reports that the world's governments are increasingly banning the death penalty; however, there are several nations who stand in stark contrast.
Shayne Silcox. "Creating community: consider this! How do we go about creating what sociologists call social capital" In this article from Public Management, Silcox argues for a social basis for happiness, claiming that "citizenship is not a spectator sport."
P.W. Singer. "How the US Military Can Win the Robotic Revolution" Singer argues for the role that technology plays in times of war and argues more broadly for the power in other military technological uses, including weaponry and transportation.
Lee Smith. "A Time for Choosing" Smith discusses the complexities of addressing the Muslim nations and argues that the Obama administration needs to narrow its focus in pursuing the peace process.
Tony Stanco. "Open Source--But Not Free" Stanco, an authority on cyber security, software policy, Open Source and e-Government issues, has spoken before Congress, the United Nations, and several other prestigious national and international committees. In the following article from Boardwatch, he argues that giving away intellectual property is akin to communism.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton. "The Solitude of Self" The author was a famed human rights activist and gave this speech about equal rights to the the Committee of the Judiciary of the United States Congress.
Lisa Turner. "Playing with Our Food: Get the Latest on Genetically Modified Organisms and Learn How They May Harm the Body, Not To Mention the Earth" In this article from Better Nutrition, Turner warns of the hidden dangers in genetically modified foods.
John K. Wilson. 'The Government Should Fund Art That May Be Offensive' Wilson argues that government funding for controversial art must continue since the alternative would amount to censorship.
CAUSE AND EFFECT.
David Blankenhorn. "Defining Marriage Down . . . Is No Way To Save It" In this article from The Weekly Standard, Blankenhorn argues that same-sex unions do not promote matrimony but instead contribute to the global deinstitutionalization of marriage.
Veronica Chambers. "Loved and Lost? It's O.K., Especially if You Win" This article discusses the effects of the author's experiences with dating.
Helen Cordes. "Doping kids: As Pharmaceutical Companies Push Their Products, More and More Kids Are Being Treated with Powerful--and Untested--Adult Drugs" In this article from Mother Jones, Cordes questions the growing trend of treating common childhood ailments with prescription drugs.
Will Englund. "The 'Bloody Shirt' of 9/11" In the following article the author addresses the causes and effects of 9/11 on national politics. Writing before the death of Osama bin Laden, Englund postulates about the ultimate place in history the September 11th attack will take.
Finessa Ferrell-Smith. "Bullying Puts Teens at Risk" Ferrell-Smith reports on the problem of school bullying and discusses the sometimes lifelong effects and consequences that follow both the bully and the victim.
Henry Louis Gates, Jr. "One Internet, Two Nations" Literary critic, cultural historian, university professor, and public intellectual, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., is a pioneering and preeminent influence in the field of African American Studies and the recipient of over fifty awards and distinctions for his work and service. Gates's critical concern with the relationship between freedom and literacy, knowledge and power, is apparent as he focuses on some of the causes and effects of a racial digital divide in American society.
Malcolm Gladwell. "Brain Candy." Making cause-and-effect connections surrounding pop culture in this essay first published in 2005, Gladwell examines whether television shows and video games, in particular, are dumbing-down American culture or smartening it up.
Christopher Lee. "Pondering the talent puzzle" Lee discusses the potential shortage of talented real estate professionals when baby boomers start to retire.
Yasmin Nair. "Binational couples see hopes rise--and fall" Nair discusses the legal complications surrounding binational couples in which one spouse faces deportation and the even more complicated situation involving gay and lesbian marriage.
David C. Nieman. "More Strength, More Endurance" In addition to research and teaching, The author is a marathon runner and was an acrobatic gymnast and coach for 10 years, in this essay he uses cause and effect to show connections between diet and athletic performance.
Scott Olson. "The Vanishing General Practitioner: More Medical Students Are Opting for Specialty Practices, Leaving a Daunting Void" This article from the Indianapolis Business Journal explores the social and economic reasons for the growing number of medical students who chose lucrative specialties over family medicine.
Wendy Plump. "A Roomful of Yearning and Regret" Plump offers advice to the reader who might be a friend contemplating an extra-marital affair.
Michael Pollan. "Why Bother?" Noted journalist and activist, Pollan considers the problem of global warming and argues that making small changes in the way we live is indeed worth the bother.
Anna Quindlen. "On Losing Your Mom" P ulitzer Prize winning journalist and a best-selling novelist and non-fiction writer, Anna Quindlen describes the effects of losing her mother.
Reihan Salam. "Blame the not-too-rich: why Obama courts the upper middle class" Salam discusses how the Obama administration favors the middle-class in order to further its own cause; he contends that because it carries significant political power, the middle class receives special treatment from the current governing party.
Brendan L. Smith "Un-Google that: Google's new pact may have crisscrossed copyright law" Smith examines he super power of large Internet companies like Google which is forcing a reexamination of copyright and other laws governing access to printed and electronic materials.
Mark Twain. "My Watch: An Instructive Little Tale" Twain uses his signature humorous and satirical style to show how a watch-repairer's poor maintenance caused his watch to keep inaccurate time.
CLASSIFICATION / DIVISION.
Mahadev Apte. "Humor, Food In" In this essay, cultural anthropologist, author, and Professor Emeritus at Duke University, Mahadev Apte's theories on humor and the bonding nature of laughter are described.
Sharon Begley and Andrew Murr. "How to Save California" In this article from the April 2011 edition of Newsweek, Begley and Murr evaluate California's preparedness level for a nuclear disaster similar to that experienced by Japan.
David Brooks. "People Like Us" Political commentator Brooks suggests that while "we all pay service to the melting pot," what "we really prefer" is the "congealing pot," and examines some of the psychological, social, and economic social forces that make sameness more attractive than difference.
Joseph A. Califano. "Substance abuse: the feminine mystique" Califano, the founder of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, discusses substance abuse among girls and young women.
Cutting Edge. "Give women due share to enhance farm yields" This article addresses the impact of gender discrimination on economic and food security in developing countries, claiming that the lack of resources afforded to women, particularly in the area of agriculture, furthers poverty and puts children at risk.
Ross Douthat. "Crises of faith: America is becoming more secular; Europe is becoming more religious. Both trends could mean trouble" Douthat joined the New York Times in 2009 as the youngest op-ed columnist in the newspaper's history. In the following article, he contrasts the impact of religion between two continents.
John P. Foreyt. "Weight Loss Diets: are they all the same?" Dr. Foreyt compares various weight loss diets and argues that all diets can potentially be successful, but there are major determinants that must be considered when evaluating diets that vary in composition.
Lauren Fitzgerald, Natasha Kohl, Liesl Scwabe, and Allison Smith. In this article, four of the staff members of the Writing Lab at Yeshiva College join in a dialogue to explain the situation when the tutors, the students, and the staff all represent quite different demographics.
Milton Gralla. "Watch Out--They're After Your Cash" First published in Executive Female in 1996, this article lists and describes common corporate and consumer scams.
Eliza Griswold. "On the fault line: Christian-Muslim encounters in Nigeria" Griswold provides a useful comparison and contrast of the Christian and Islamic communities in Nigeria. Even though each group still holds strong, deeply-rooted ideological differences with the other, two leaders have endeavored to make inroads towards peace in their portion of the world.
Harry Heiti. "6 Most Painful Places To Get A Tattoo'; Most tattoo artists use the numbing cream to numb the skin for painless tattoo" First published in OfficalSpin, Heiti details the areas of the body that are most sensitive to tattooing.
Robert Lohrer. "Are You An Identity Seeker, A Simplifier Or A Proactive Integrator? RISC Study Classifies Men Into Five Categories That Differ On Social Values And Dressing Habits." Lohrer has truly found his niche through merging his knowledge of sports and his uncanny expertise in the fashion industry. In the essay that follows, published in the Daily News Record, Lohrer, following specific criteria, classifies men.
Macmillan Social Science Library. "Renewable Energy" The following article, published in 2010, categorizes renewable energy sources, discussing the pros and cons of each type.
Jay Matthews. "Six Ways to Be Happy With Your College Choice" Jay Matthews writes for The Washington Post where he reports on such issues as education, class struggle, and disability rights in both print and online formats; here he offers ways to be more satisfied with one's college choice.
Amy Miller. "The Knockout Lesson" The author draws parallels between her ice cream company's rapid growth and her involvement in women's boxing, which showed her how to pursue her own ideas of success instead of the expectations of others.
Cullen Murphy. "The Power of Two: the new way of classifying everyone" In this article, Murphy humorously discusses The Theory of Divisibility and how it can be used to classify personality traits.
Carolyn Foster Segal. "The Dog Ate My Disk, and Other Tales of Woe" This article, which classifies common student excuses for turning in late work, originally appeared in The Chronicle of Higher Education.
Le'Ann Solmonson. "Cultural Variations in Parenting and Implications for the Counseling Professional" In this report from the Michigan Journal of Counseling, Solmonson distinguishes between the parenting styles of African Americans, Asians, Hispanics, and European Americans.
Linda Stone. "Kinship." In the following article, first published in 2008 in the International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, Stone categorizes the anthropological study of kinship.
Jem Sullivan, James Elkins, and Matthew J. Milliner. "Art and hypocrisy" This series of letters shows the various ways that an issue can be classified by various parties. Consider it a useful and telling example of an "ongoing conversation" in the academic world.
Deborah Tannen. "I'm Sorry, I'm Not Apologizing." Well-respected and very prolific author, Deborah Tannen has studied conversation styles between parents and children and between siblings. In this essay, she puts forth some of her seminal ideas about "genderlects" and talking at cross-purposes.
E.B. White. 'You Can't Resettle Me! A Defense of New York by a Stubborn Inhabitant" While no one essay can capture the many varied interests of this master essayist, the following essay, first published in the Saturday Evening Post in 1936, does give some indication of the White's lifelong love affair with New York City, as well as of the whimsical voice that characterizes his writings.
Peter Wood. "From Diversity to Sustainability: How Campus Ideology Is Born" This article compares and contrasts diversity and sustainability as campus movements, and addresses changes in the focus of campus activism over the last several years.
COMPARE /CONTRAST.
Karen Armstrong "What's God Got to Do with It?" Armstrong presents some similarities and differences among the world's great faiths, ultimately contending that they share the same roots.
Aaron DeNu. "Transforming soccer talk in the United States: the misapplication of a formulaic announcing methodology" DeNu was a prime organizer of the "Soccer in the Circle 2010" World Cup Fan Festival at Washinton, D.C. In the following article, the authors suggests that techniques of announcing other sports do not transfer well to soccer play-by-play announcing.
Stephen Farenga and Daniel Ness. "Going locavore: teaching students about the benefits of food produced locally" The authors suggest that education about where food comes from might be accomplished through raising awareness in school children. They offer a comparison of a variety of aspects about the locavore lifestyle.
Jeff Janssen. "Gender Roles: Discover the Differences between Coaching Male and Female Athletes" In this article, first published in Coach and Athletic Director in 2010, Janssen points out key differences in the coachability, confidence, competitiveness, and chemistry of male and female athletes.
Anna Quindlen. "Turning the Page." Anna Quindlen is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and a best-selling novelist and non-fiction writer; this is a cover story from Newsweek about print books vs. books in technological formats, and the effect of technology on literacy.
David Standish. "The Art of Money" In this essay, published in Smithsonian, Standish compares the artwork on different countries' currency.
DEFINITION.
Marlene Asselin. "Teaching Literacy from and with Popular Culture" The author defines literacy in a useful and interesting way, expanding upon traditional definitions to include the ways current students and teachers much grapple with their culture and their online presence.
Rebecca Blood. "Weblogs and Journalism: Do They Connect?" Blood maintains her own website where she has created a blog called Rebecca's Pocket and posts regularly on a variety of topics. Here she defines weblogs and discusses their function.
Jefferson Chase. "Private Military Firms Likely To Stay in Iraq, Afghanistan Despite Criticism" In this article for Deutsche Welle, Chase explains the role of private military firms in Iraq and Afghanistan and explores their political significance.
Isaac Chotiner. "Globish for Beginners" Chotiner is a prolific journalist whose topics include national and international politics, the press, and the media. In the review essay that follows, Chotiner discusses Robert McCrum's study of Globish (2010), while developing his own further critical analysis of language and globalization.
Meghan Daum. "Urge Overkill" Daum writes a weekly column for The Los Angeles Times and contributes articles to various magazines and newspapers; this article focuses on the nature of obsession in American culture.
Vanda Felbab-Brown. "Guerrilla Warfare." A frequent commentator in international media, Felbab-Brown frequently testifies on these issues in the U.S. Congress and in this following article, she defines guerilla warfare.
Michael A. Grandillo. "Social Fraternities and Sororities" In the following 2002 article from the Encyclopedia of Education, Grandillo defines social fraternities and sororities.
Jen Gunnels. "Mendlesohn, Farah. The Intergalactic Playground: A Critical Study of Children's and Teens' Science Fiction." In this book review she touches on the vexed and vexing task of defining "science fiction" as a genre and examines the ways in which readers of all ages encounter and appreciate the genre (however it is defined).
Rebecca Mead. "What Do You Call It?" Mead glances back over the first decade of the twenty-first century and touches on some its defining developments, while musing over the cultural puzzle of coming up with an adequate collective name for the decade.
Elizabeth Say. "Family Values" In the following article, first published in the International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences in 2008, Day looks closely at the term, "family values."
Marvin J. Stone. "The humanities are the hormones" Stone looks back on the address given by Dr. William Osler when he was inaugurated as the president of the British Classical Association, the first physician to hold that position.
Paul Theroux. "Nightmare and Defiance" In this article from Newsweek, Theroux describes the resiliency of the earthquake and tsunami-ravaged Japanese people.
Stephen Weiner. "Beyond Superheroes: Comics Get Serious" In this 2002 article for Library Journal, a scholarly publication aimed primarily at those in the library field, Weiner defines the term "graphic novel" and gives advice to librarians eager to build a collection of these for patrons.
David Wallace-Wells. "Andy Warhol: Factory Man" The author is a noted writer about culture and the arts and here he defines the character and work of the artist Andy Warhol, who is most well-known for his series of paintings of soup cans.
DESCRIPTION.
Scott Carlson. "American U.'s Sustainability Director Adds a Good Beer to His Portfolio" This article describes a setting on American University's campus that makes a strong case about the role of college campuses (and the various directors who manage sustainability programs) in setting the tone for academic conversations about such social issues as sustainability, alcohol consumption, and accountability.
Ron Colbert. "Teacher candidate fashion, tattoos, and piercings: finding balance and common sense" While students are probably more easy about having a teacher with tattoos, parents, teacher educators, and school administrators represent a somewhat more conservative view. The article helps unpack the myriad social and cultural issues which impinge upon contemporary education.
Steve Coll. "The Outlaw" Coll describes his visit to Jeddah, Saudia Arabia, where Osama bin Laden grew up; he describes the city's main thoroughfares which serves as the backdrop for his account of Osama bin Laden's life.
Neil deGrasse Tyson. "Between the Galaxies." In 2006 NASA appointed Tyson to serve on its Advisory Council. Tyson currently serves as the director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in addition to hosting PBS's NOVA ScienceNOW. In the following essay, from the June 1999 edition of Natural History, Tyson describes the marvel of the largely unknown space between galaxies.
Gretel Ehrlich. "Santa Rosa Island, 1998 (Journal). In this article, which originally appeared in American Scholar, Ehrlich includes several journal entries about time when she "cowboyed" on Santa Rosa Island.
Ian Frazier. "Urban Life: Pick Your Part" In this descriptive essay first published in The Atlantic, Frazier extols the sights and experiences of an excursion to Los Angeles, California, specifically to an automobile scrap yard where one can pull the parts from one vehicle to repair another.
John Gibler. "Lost in the Valley of Excess: California's Wealthiest Growers, Poorest Workers, and the Water between Them ..." In this excerpt of an article published in Earth Island Journal in 2011, Gibler details the plight of migrant laborers in California's agricultural Kern County.
Lila Guterman. "Where Art Imitates Wildlife" In the following essay, first published in June 2004 in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Guterman describes a unique program that trains students in scientific drawing.
Georgina Howell. "The most desirable women in the world are not necessarily the most beautiful." Howell describes various ideals of beauty in this article from Harper's Bazaar, claiming that desirability and ideal beauty are not necessarily synonymous.
Jessica Iredale. "Needles: Scott Campbell's Designer Label" Iredale, a fashion writer, profiles Scott Campbell and his upscale tattoo business.
Patrick J. Kiger. "Unnatural Wonders" In the following essay, first published in Mother Jones, Kiger describes the environmental impact of coal mining on Appalachia.
Jhumpa Lahiri. "The Long Way Home" A contemporary Indian American writer, Lahiri describes her return to her Bengali upbringing in Rhode Island.
Judith Ortiz-Cofer. "The Sign." Judith Ortiz Cofer is a Latin-American poet and author of fiction and essays. This article, describes how two friends look for one kind of sign and find another.
Lynne M. Pettey. 'Finance, fitness & federal reform: healthy lifestyles are being emphasized by many companies to reduce costs, and the new health care law includes grants for small employers to establish workplace wellness programs" Pettey discusses how wellness grants are leading small companies to initiate health and wellness programs for employees and explores the connection between wellness programs and the reduction of spiraling health care costs.
Polyxeni Potter. "Microbiologic and cultural interchange" Polyxeni Potter has served as a managing editor at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. In this article she follows the career of African American artist Hale Woodruff (1900-1980), who was involved in the academic art programs at several universities in Georgia.
Jamie Rosen. "What he really thinks of your plastic surgery" The author takes a look at the cosmetic surgery industry and what the male perspective has to say (and feel) regarding procedures that are most often performed on women.
Jeffrey Tayler. "White Nights in Siberia" Tayler vividly describes his travels down the Lena River in Siberia accompanied by sixty fellow passengers.
ILLUSTRATION / EXAMPLE.
Tom Bartlett. "Step Away From the Coke Machine" Bartlett, senior editor at The Chronicle of Higher Education, discusses the possibility of taxing "junk" food and why the potential is greater than in the past.
Jessica Bennett. "Everything I Learned About Women I Learned from Reality TV" Bennett looks at reality television's influence on how women are viewed in society, in light of the often stereotypical roles they play on such shows.
Kris Berggren. "Kids and Consumerism: Social Justice-Minded Parents Seek Ways to Resist Pressures of Commercial" Berggren is a freelance journalist and correspondent who focuses on issues connected to women, family, education policy, and travel; this article highlights challenges that parents face in a consumer driven society.
Sagarika Ghose. "Little People Matter" In " Ghose discusses cultural and economic influences between America and India, and suggests how future relations might be approached.
Neal Justin. "Pigskin, pugilism remain vital to the pay cabler's fun and games department" The author illustrates several factors, figures, and philosophies that led to HBO's success with cable TV's fun and games department.
Garrison Keillor. "Roomfuls of Total Strangers" Humorist, satirist, and story-teller, Keillor is celebrated for his work as a radio personality, and especially as the creator and host of A Prairie Home Companion. ThIS essay gives a taste of Midwestern state fairs.
Lydia Lum. "Portals to new career paths: in today's ever-changing business climate, college-educated professionals are increasingly transitioning to new careers with community college" Lum discusses the trend of college graduates who return to school, including those with advanced degrees, to opt for community college programs.
Kathryn Masterson. "Islamic Scholars Plan for America's First Muslim College." The narrative in this article, first published in September 2009, traces the founding of the nation's first Muslim college and the attendant challenges faced by its founders.
Ken McLeod. "The indifference engine: how science fiction contributes to the public understanding of science, and how it doesn't" This article, first published in Extrapolation, Spring 2010, explores various definitions of science fiction (sf) as a literary and cultural genre. McLeod illustrates the differences between written and media sf, and argues for sf's role in how so-called lay readers understand science.
Susan Meyers. "Pura Vida: what my life in Costa Rica taught me about teaching English as a second language." As a graduate student in a different culture, Meyers gained new insight on the challenges of writers coming from other cultures.
Barack Obama. 'World Has Changed, and We Must Change With It" Obama's inaugural speech illustrates his campaign platform of "Change" and the challenges it brings.
Theodore Roosevelt. "College Graduates Own America: August 1894" Roosevelt argues why it is incumbent upon men of means and education to take an active role in public affairs.
Joel Schwartz. "Pater Knows Best; The quest for success in inner-city schools" This article, which is a review of David Whitman's 2008 book Sweating the Small Stuff: Inner-City Schools and the New Paternalism, illustrates the problems inherent in improving schools in an era of personal autonomy and individualism.
Peter Severance. "The Legend of the Tarahumara" Peter Severance researched and wrote a unique cultural expose about the Tarahumara tribe of Native Americans in Mexico, which is noted for the running abilities of its people.
Christopher Werth. "Pop Goes the Market" As a journalist on an array of topics for both Newsweek and the public radio program, Marketplace. Werth discusses the relationship between the art world and money for a piece which appears in Newsweek International.
NARRATION.
James S. Berrien. "'We Want to Make Our Babies Better'; A father describes his daughter's journey from sickness to health--and how his family had to change." In the following essay from Newsweek, Berrien recounts the moving experience his family shared as they supported their daughter's recovery from anorexia.
Lucy Jane Bledsoe. "Finding Myself in Antarctica" This narrative essay is about the author's experience living at a station in Antarctica for months with a group of scientists and first appeared in The Gay and Lesbian Review Worldwide in 2010.
Wallace Paul Conklin. "My Day with Hemingway" While serving as a lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force in the mid-1950s, Wallace Paul Conklin had an opportunity to travel with a basketball team on a goodwill sports mission to Havana, Cuba. He writes about an unexpected visit with author Ernest Hemingway at the estate where he lived in seclusion.
Rob Fitzgerald. "Be like Dwight: Dwight Freeney's old-school work ethic and determination are the modern athlete's template for excellence" Fitzgerald discusses the process by which Dwight Freeney has established his immense reputation as an athlete and all-around good guy in an era of bad-guy sports "heroes."
Ian Frazier. "The mornings after: looking out from New Jersey, the view of the Manhattan skyline--and of the world beyond--has been changed forever" Frazier describes his experiences in dealing with the impact of the terrorist attacks of 9/11.
Shaili Jain. "The psych consult" Jain is a member of the clinical faculty at the Medical College of Wisconsin Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine and has a private practice . This narrative article is about her experience with a troublesome patient.
Brennen Jensen. "Mixing Bach and Social Justice" This article discusses the current state of affairs in charitable giving in the United States.
Anne Lamott. "Single but Mothers by Choice; When Going It Alone Turns Out to Be Not So Alone at All" Anne Lamott is a novelist, nonfiction writer, political activist, public speaker, and writing teacher and recounts her experience as a single parent.
Laurie Penny. "No Drugs. No Sex. And No Leaders: They've Been Dismissed as Naive Idealists, but Today's Student Protesters Are Pragmatic, Democratic and Astonishingly Media-savvy. Laurie Penny Gives a First-hand Account of a Group Battling To Find New Methods of Resistance" In this blog from The New Statesman, Penny tells the story of a group of student protesters and compares them to their 1960s predecessors.
Kevin Patrick Richberg. "America's 30-city blind date adventure makes stop in Wichita" In this article, first published in Liberty Press in November 2010, Richberg narrates a successful cross-country dating experiment.
James Salter. "The Gift" The author of several screenplays as well, including Downhill Racer (1969), and the recipient of the PEN/Faulkner Award for Dusk and Other Stories (1988), Salter reflected on his varied career in his 1998 memoir Burning the Days. Here, he recounts a thrilling hour in the company of Vladimir Nabokov.
Alix Kates Shulman "Help Wanted: Other Woman" Alix Kates Shulman is an American writer of fiction, memoirs, and essays, as well as one of the early radical feminist activists. In this essays she recounts her experience living with a loved one who is disabled.
Chad L. Summitt. "CSAR: there I was" Summitt, a member of an Air Force team called upon for search and rescue in combat, tells the story of one mission in Iraq and the lessons learned from it.
Amy Tan. "Family Ghosts Hoard Secrets That Bewitch the Living" In this essay, Tan discusses her mother's death and explores the nature of death in Chinese culture.
Tobias Wolff. "Winter Light" In the essay, Wolff discusses how aesthetics can shape our lives in often different ways depending on the individual. He explores how various art forms, such as film and poetry, can influence our beliefs and faith.
PROCESS.
Caralee J. Adams. "Elementary Students Encouraged to Set College Goals; Schools Try to Establish a College-Going Culture" In this 2010 article from Education Week, Adams describes the creative approaches elementary schools coast-to-coast are taking to encourage their students to go to college.
Joseph Epstein. "Early Riser: The Joy of Getting Out of Bed and Down to Work" Epstein is a celebrated wit, renowned essayist and respected fiction writer; here he suggests how mundane routines become meaningful and pleasure comes to exist side-by-side with quotidian necessity.
John Godfrey. "Tense Negotiations" Godfrey discusses parenting issues related to violent computer games.
Dexter Gordon and Grace Livingston. 'A chat and a tweet on race: a new, substantive and sustained conversation about race is needed but should originate in college classrooms." In this jointly authored article, which appeared in Diverse Issues in Higher Education in 2010, the professors articulate the process by which conversations about race in the United States have shifted over the past few years as citizens find themselves more and more in virtual and strangely mediated social relationships online.
Karina Hamalainen. "Mining Lithium for Your iPod: Why is the Third Element on the Periodic Table so Important? It's Needed To Power Everything from MP3 Players to Cars" In this 2011 article from Science World, Hamalainen describes the process of mining lithium and making lithium-ion batteries.
A.J. Jacobs. "How to Raise Men" This father of three turns his attention to process writing in the following Esquire article, using his own experiences as a father to show how boys can innately adopt certain "male" traits.
Ellie Kay. "When two become one: living on one income is more doable than you think! Here's how" Kay has served as the consumer finance consultant with several Fortune 100 companies. In the following essay, from Marriage Partnership, Kay outlines a step-by-step process for tailoring a two-income lifestyle to a one-income budget.
Kathy Kuenzer. "Hey Mozart!' a program for all ages" In this article, Kuenzer praises a new music program for middle-school students and notes its positive effects on them.
Michael F. Optiz. "Transcending the curricular barrier between fitness and reading with FitLit" In this article Optiz discusses creating a connection between reading and fitness.
H. Wolfgang Porter. "Cinema verite documentary: documentary filmmaking is as old as the motion picture format itself. There has always been a desire for film and video directors to 'tell the story as it happens'." Porter, a former U.S. Naval Combat Cameraman has been honored with several awards and in this article in Videomaker, he describes the process behind cinema verite.
Christen Rachul. "Much ado about something: insights into the science communication process." Rachul's article on the relationship between science researchers and the media examines how each end of the process might contribute to miscommunication in reporting health research issues to the public.
Don Rauf. "Coping with Cash and Credit" In the article, Rauf details a process to assist college freshman in managing their finances.
Stephen Schneiderman. "In Pursuit of Photo Surrealism: Using computer techniques to make the images that you couldn't take" Schneiderman has been recognized as an innovator of surreal photography. In this article, he describes the process of developing the early stages of his style.
Susan Sontag. "Directions: Write, Read, Rewrite. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as Needed" Novelist, literary critic, political activist, and avant-garde theorist, Susan Sontag was a prominent public intellectual for more than four decades. In this essay, Sontag meditates on the pleasure, as well as the pain, of writing.
Mark Starr. "The Perfect Essay" First published in Newsweek, and written as Starr and his wife were helping their daughter navigate the college admissions process, this article provides a step-by-step method for writing a winning college essay.
Jack Welch and Suzy Welch. "How To Be a Good Leader; During his long career, Welch mentored a generation of future CEOs. In an exclusive excerpt, his rules of the game" Jack Welch is a well-known and well-regarded writer and speaker on business management techniques. This article provides advice for how a businessperson can become a strong leader.
Gretchen Werle."Working smart through community service learning" The author describes the process of incorporating service learning into secondary education at the community level. Its step-by-step approach provides a useful basis for examining the ways in which such programs and teaching can enrich student learning in health education.
William Zinsser. "Writing family history: how to tell a story for generations to come" Zinsser writes on a wide range of topics, including personal memoir, travel, and writing; here he offers advice and a process for creating a family history.

Supplements

Instructor Supplements

Instructor Supplements

All supplements have been updated in coordination with the main title. Select the main title’s "About the Solution" tab, then select "What's New" for updates specific to title's edition. For more information about these supplements, or to obtain them, contact your Learning Consultant.

CourseReader 0-30: Rhetorical Modes Instant Access  (ISBN-10: 1428273387 | ISBN-13: 9781428273382)

COURSEREADER: RHETORICAL MODES is a fully customizable online reader which provides access to readings to complement your composition course. This easy-to-use solution allows you to select exactly the content you need to enhance your course, and is loaded with convenient features like highlighting, printing, and note-taking. Choose readings--all with permissions cleared-- illustrating rhetorical modes often covered in freshman composition courses: narration, illustration, description, process, definition, analysis, cause and effect, classification / division, comparison and contrast and argument. YOU have the freedom to assign individualized content at an affordable price. COURSEREADER: RHETORICAL MODES is the perfect complement to any composition class.


CourseReader 0-60: Rhetorical Modes Instant Access Code  (ISBN-10: 1428273409 | ISBN-13: 9781428273405)

COURSEREADER: RHETORICAL MODES is a fully customizable online reader which provides access to readings to complement your composition course. This easy-to-use solution allows you to select exactly the content you need to enhance your course, and is loaded with convenient features like highlighting, printing, and note-taking. Choose readings--all with permissions cleared-- illustrating rhetorical modes often covered in freshman composition courses: narration, illustration, description, process, definition, analysis, cause and effect, classification / division, comparison and contrast and argument. YOU have the freedom to assign individualized content at an affordable price. COURSEREADER: RHETORICAL MODES is the perfect complement to any composition class.


CourseReader Unlimited: Rhetorical Modes Instant Access Code  (ISBN-10: 1428273441 | ISBN-13: 9781428273443)

*COURSEREADER: RHETORICAL MODES is a fully customizable online reader which provides access to readings to complement your composition course. This easy-to-use solution allows you to select exactly the content you need to enhance your course, and is loaded with convenient features like highlighting, printing, and note-taking. Choose readings--all with permissions cleared-- illustrating rhetorical modes often covered in freshman composition courses: narration, illustration, description, process, definition, analysis, cause and effect, classification / division, comparison and contrast and argument. YOU have the freedom to assign individualized content at an affordable price. COURSEREADER: RHETORICAL MODES is the perfect complement to any composition class.


Student Supplements

Student Supplements

All supplements have been updated in coordination with the main title. Select the main title’s "About the Solution" tab, then select "What's New" for updates specific to title's edition. For more information about these supplements, or to obtain them, contact your Learning Consultant.

CourseReader 0-30: Rhetorical Modes Instant Access  (ISBN-10: 1428273387 | ISBN-13: 9781428273382)

Enjoy easy-to-use and affordable access to readings for your courses with this customized online reader. COURSEREADER: RHETORICAL MODES helps you stay organized and facilitates convenient access to course material, no matter where you are.


CourseReader 0-60: Rhetorical Modes Instant Access Code  (ISBN-10: 1428273409 | ISBN-13: 9781428273405)

Enjoy easy-to-use and affordable access to readings for your courses with this customized online reader. COURSEREADER: RHETORICAL MODES helps you stay organized and facilitates convenient access to course material, no matter where you are.


CourseReader Unlimited: Rhetorical Modes Instant Access Code  (ISBN-10: 1428273441 | ISBN-13: 9781428273443)

Enjoy easy-to-use and affordable access to readings for your courses with this customized online reader. COURSEREADER: RHETORICAL MODES helps you stay organized and facilitates convenient access to course material, no matter where you are.


MindLink for CourseReader 0-60: Rhetorical Modes Instant Access  (ISBN-10: 1285368592 | ISBN-13: 9781285368597)

Your instructor chose selections from a collection of articles, primary and secondary sources, and videos to create a customized online reader just for your class! Your reader contains only selections chosen by your instructor. You can easily access these selections online anytime, anywhere. CourseReader tools also allow you to add highlights and notes to your selections to help you study.


MindLink to CourseReader 0-30: Rhetorical Modes Instant Access  (ISBN-10: 1285368584 | ISBN-13: 9781285368580)

Your instructor chose selections from a collection of articles, primary and secondary sources, and videos to create a customized online reader just for your class! Your reader contains only selections chosen by your instructor. You can easily access these selections online anytime, anywhere. CourseReader tools also allow you to add highlights and notes to your selections to help you study.


MindLink to CourseReader Unlimited: Rhetorical Modes Instant Access  (ISBN-10: 1285368568 | ISBN-13: 9781285368566)

Your instructor chose selections from a collection of articles, primary and secondary sources, and videos to create a customized online reader just for your class! Your reader contains only selections chosen by your instructor. You can easily access these selections online anytime, anywhere. CourseReader tools also allow you to add highlights and notes to your selections to help you study.