eBook Jay and Ellsworth, The First Courts: Justices, Rulings, and Legacy, 1st Edition

  • Matthew P. Harrington
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1576078426
  • ISBN-13: 9781576078426
  • DDC: 347.73
  • Grade Level Range: 12th Grade - College Senior
  • 309 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2008 | Published/Released September 2010
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2008
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About

Overview

When the Supreme Court was established in 1789, no other country had a judicial body quite like it. The early justices struggled to give definition to such concepts as "judicial review" and "separation of powers." The early court approached its role in ways that would be startling today, often using its power to support the new government rather than merely serving as an independent arbiter.

The Jay-Ellsworth Courts were the first to take up the role of interpreting the constitution, and their approach influenced constitutional debates for the next two centuries. Clearly, this is a book for any reader who wishes to understand how the court was initially set up and how it functioned in our early judicial history. The Supreme Court was something of an experiment. The first courts of John Jay and Oliver Ellsworth had to determine exactly what the court's role would be, and they were required to define important concepts and interpret the Constitution for the very first time. Readers will learn why in this intriguing work. When the Supreme Court was established in 1789, no other country had a judicial body quite like it. The early justices struggled to give definition to such concepts as "judicial review" and "separation of powers." The early court approached its role in ways that would be startling today, often using its power to support the new government rather than merely serving as an independent arbiter.

The Jay-Ellsworth Courts were the first to take up the role of interpreting the constitution, and their approach influenced constitutional debates for the next two centuries. Clearly, this is a book for any reader who wishes to understand how the court was initially set up and how it functioned in our early judicial history.