Literary Movements for Students, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 0787665177
  • ISBN-13: 9780787665173
  • DDC: 809
  • Shipping Weight: 6.90 lbs ( 3.13 kgs)
  • 600 Pages | Print | Hardcover
  • © 2003 | Published

About

Overview

Building on the format of other successful Gale "For Students" titles, Literary Movements for Students is designed to meet the needs of researchers studying literary movements and the specific works representative of various movements. Entries provide in-depth historical background information on each movement as well as modern critical interpretation of each movement's characteristic styles and themes. Approximately 25 movements are covered, including:

  • Absurdism
  • Bildungsroman
  • Greek drama
  • Harlem renaissance
  • Magic realism
  • Modernism
  • Postmodernism
  • Science fiction/fantasy
  • Surrealism
  • Transcendentalism
  • And many others

Detailed entries follow a consistent format and include: an introduction; thumbnail sketches of representative authors and works; discussion of the principal themes and styles associated with the movement; an outline of the historical context of the movement, including the social, political and cultural climate of the time; a critical overview; and a selection of reprinted critical essays on the movement. In addition, each entry includes a list of further reading sources and suggested study topics.

Reviews

"Another valuable title in the Gale For Students line, this set is meant to 'provide readers with a guide to understanding, enjoying, and studying literary movements'... Twenty-eight literary movements are described in their historical and cultural contents. Volume One includes literature before the twentieth century and Volume Two covers the twentieth century... high school English and social studies teachers will snap this work up, and it will be well used in school, college, and public library collections." -- Booklist (March 2003)

— Booklist

"Another valuable title in the Gale For Students line, this set is meant to "provide readers with a guide to understanding, enjoying, and studying literary movements..." There are a few problems with the indexing. Chinua Achebe isn't in the "Author/Title Index" although his novel Things Fall Apart is. The "Subject/theme Index" is not detailed enough—under Fate and chance, for example, are 47 undifferentiated page number citations. Edward Said is pictured and mentioned briefly in the chapter "Postcolonialism" but does not appear in any index; a general index would capture items that do not fit within the indexing system. Despite these minor flaws, high-school English and social studies teachers will snap this work up, and it will be well used in school, college, and public library collections." -- Booklist (April 2003)

— Booklist

"The substantial slices of Western literary history served up here will help readers understand works in context... The alphabetical entries are consistent in level and voice and range from relatively simple description of texts to more challenging intricacies of criticism... these volumes are well-conceived, reliable, and valuable resources, and will be sought by teachers as well as students." -- School Library Journal (August 2003)

— School Library Journal

"..high school teachers and students and college undergraduates will find these volumes useful.." -- ARBA (2003)

— ARBA

"Galens provides overviews and critiques of 28 literary movements, classicism to postmodernism. Volume 1 features movements before the 20th century, while volume 2 concentrates on more modern movements. The volumes are alphabetized separately, and each provides a separate author, nationality, and subject/theme index...Galen's work distinguishes itself by supplying special features for instructors, such as ideas for research papers, study questions, and a specially commissioned critical essay on each movement...Unified indexing and greater attention to additional resources would enhance the set, but it nevertheless supplies accessible entry into major literary movements...Recommended. High school students and undergraduates." -- Choice (June 2003)

— Choice