eBook Encyclopedia of the New American Nation, 1st Edition

  • Editor: Paul Finkelman [University of Tulsa]
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 068431469X
  • ISBN-13: 9780684314693
  • DDC: 973.03
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 1618 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2006 | Published/Released December 2005
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2006
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About

Overview

How did the U.S. evolve toward nationhood? Which factors prompted its turn away from Colonial status to independence? How was the Revolutionary War fought and won against such overwhelming odds? What were the conceptual underpinnings of the new society in its wake? These questions fuel class discussions and research assignments for students in junior high/middle school, high school and college every day, as well as the Supreme Court decisions that make our headlines. For the secondary and college student -- as well as the general reader -- this set is the definitive work answering these and other questions.

Coverage begins just prior to the American Revolution, including the Revolution, the framing of the American Constitution, the organization of a new national government, the development of the party system, the Louisiana Purchase, the second war with Britain, the acquisition of Florida and the Monroe Doctrine. Chronologically, this period is roughly from 1754 (beginning of the Seven Years’ War) to the inauguration of President Andrew Jackson (1829). Woven among this set of political markers and milestones are entries outlining the cultural development of the new nation, including entries on art, music, literature, dress and daily life.

Included in this set are:

  • 670 articles ranging from 250 to 5,000 words in length
  • 100 sidebars spotlighting key events, people, and concepts
  • 200 illustrations and more than 10 archival maps
  • A chronology of major events
  • A comprehensive index

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Contributors

Contributors

  • Paul Finkelman [University of Tulsa]

Alternate Formats

  • Casebound Edition

    ISBN-10: 0684313464 | ISBN-13: 9780684313467

Reviews

"Attractively bound and easy to use, this set gives a comprehensive view of national history in the nation-forming period and is accessible for students from high-school through university levels. Recommended for academic and large public libraries, especially those owning other sets in the series." --Booklist, April 2006

— Booklist

"...covering 1754 to 1829, the reader and researcher will find virtually every topic that students will conceive as possible research interests. With more than 600 main entries and very helpful cross-references, this reference work is both readable and useful." -- Library Media Connection (January 2007)

— John R.M. Lawrence

"Finkelman, his editors, and contributors have created a useful reference tool that maintains Scribner’s reputation for high-quality specialized encyclopedia sets. Reference librarians, undergraduates, and high school students can use this set to deepen their understanding of American history from 1754 to 1829." --ARBA, March 2007

— John R.M. Lawrence

"With this majestic compilation of close to 700 entries, Scribner completes its set of four encyclopedias covering American history. Encompassing the years from 1754 to 1829, this set includes essays on asylums, class, health and disease, humor, an intriguing article on male friendships, and a series of articles describing how virtually every facet of women’s lives changed. Fertile reading for any student of early American history." --Library Journal, April 15, 2007

— Library Journal

"This excellent survey of American social history is highly recommended for high school, public and academic libraries."

— John R.M. Lawrence

This new encyclopedia traces the development of the American identity from the French and Indian Wars to the inauguration of Andrew Jackson in 1829."--Lawrence Looks at Books, November 2006

— John R.M. Lawrence