eBook The Britannica Guide to World Literature: English Literature from the Old English Period Through the Renaissance, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1615302301
  • ISBN-13: 9781615302307
  • DDC: 820.9
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - 12th Grade
  • 288 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2011 | Published/Released April 2012
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2011
  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Retaining the thrill and tone of oral storytelling as the written word became increasingly widespread was the charge of early English writing. Beginning in the Old English period and continuing through the Medieval and Renaissance periods, writers such as Geoffrey Chaucer and William Shakespeare began to elevate the place of literature in society. This volume details the evolution of early English literature and the enduring works that have withstood centuries of linguistic and cultural change.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Introduction.
1: The Old English Period.
2: Poetry.
3: The Major Manuscripts.
4: Problems of Dating.
5: Religious Verse.
6: Elegiac and Heroic Verse.
7: Prose.
8: Early Translations into English.
9: Late 10th- and 11th-Century Prose.
10: Significant Figures and Texts.
11: Notable Old English Writers.
12: Notable Old English Texts.
13: The Middle English Period.
14: Early Middle English Poetry.
15: Influence of French Poetry.
16: Fabliau.
17: Didactic Poetry.
18: Verse Romance.
19: Beast Epic.
20: Arthurian Legend.
21: Breton Lay.
22: The Lyric.
23: Early Middle English Prose.
24: Later Middle English Poetry.
25: Alliterative Poetry.
26: Courtly Poetry.
27: Popular and Secular Verse.
28: Political Verse.
29: Later Middle English Prose.
30: Religious Prose.
31: Secular Prose.
32: Middle English Drama.
33: Mystery Plays.
34: Morality Plays.
35: Everyman.
36: Miracle Plays.
37: The Transition from Medieval to Renaissance.
38: Significant Middle English Literary Figures.
39: William Caxton.
40: Geoffrey Chaucer.
41: John Gower.
42: Lawamon.
43: Robert Mannyng.
44: Orm.
45: Richard Rolle.
46: The Renaissance Period (1550–1660).
47: Social Conditions.
48: Intellectual and Religious Revolution.
49: The Race for Cultural Development.
50: Elizabethan Poetry and Prose.
51: Development of the English Language.
52: Sir Philip Sidney and Edmund Spenser.
53: Elizabethan Lyric.
54: The Sonnet Sequence.
55: Other Poetic Styles.
56: Prose Styles, 1550–1600.
57: Early Stuart Poetry and Prose.
58: House of Stuart.
59: The Metaphysical Poets.
60: The Metaphysicals.
61: Ben Jonson and the Cavalier Poets.
62: Continued Influence of Spenser.
63: Spenserian Stanza.
64: The Effect of Religion and Science on Early Stuart Prose.
65: Prose Styles.
66: John Milton and the Renaissance.
67: Milton's Life and Works.
68: Milton's Influence.
69: Elizabethan and Early Stuart Drama.
70: Theatres in London and the Provinces.
71: Professional Playwrights.
72: Blank Verse.
73: Christopher Marlowe.
74: Marlowe's Works.
75: Literary Career.
76: Assessment.
77: William Shakespeare.
78: Shakespeare the Man.
79: Shakespeare's Early Plays.
80: Plays of the Middle and Late Years.
81: The Poems.
82: Collaborations and Spurious Attributions.
83: Questions of Authorship.
84: Playwrights after Shakespeare.
85: Ben Jonson.
86: Other Jacobean Dramatists.
87: The Last Renaissance Dramatists.
Epilogue.
Glossary.
Bibliography.
Index.