eBook When Good Companies Go Bad: 100 Corporate Miscalculations and Misdeeds, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1610694058
  • ISBN-13: 9781610694056
  • DDC: 364.16
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 288 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2015 | Published/Released November 2014
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2015
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About

Overview

Corporations are in the business of making money. But when companies forget ethics, take operational shortcuts, or willingly endanger customers and the general public in their quest for profits, disasters of enormous magnitude can result. This book examines 100 of the worst cases of corporate greed and irresponsibility and poses the questions: Is it necessary or desirable to conduct business in this manner? Do the penalties and other punishments levied against these companies go far enough? And what is the government’s responsibility for keeping corporate misdeeds in check? Coauthored by distinguished public policy experts, When Good Companies Go Bad: 100 Corporate Miscalculations and Misdeeds presents a representative sample of cases on a variety of topics, such as the financial sector, health care, environmental protection, product liability, and copyright. This broad introduction to the dark side of the corporate world focuses on events and scandals that resulted in substantial financial penalties, regulatory actions, or criminal convictions. The cases are presented in a readable and engaging format, making the book an illuminating and informative read for high school and college students as well as businesspeople, lawyers, journalists, and professors who teach American politics, public law, or public policy.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Introduction.
1: Abbott Laboratories (2003).
2: Abbott Laboratories (2012).
3: Abercrombie & Fitch (2004).
4: Adelphia Communications (2005).
5: Ahold (2005).
6: AIG (2006).
7: AIG and PNC Financial Services (2003–2004).
8: Alabama Power (2006).
9: American Electric Power (2006).
10: AOL–Time Warner (2005).
11: Apple (2013).
12: AstraZeneca (2003).
13: AstraZeneca (2011–2013).
14: Bank of America, UBS, GE Capital, and Wells Fargo (2012).
15: Bank of America and Countrywide Financial (2011).
16: Bank of America and Merrill Lynch (2013).
17: Bank of America and Merrill Lynch (2012).
18: Bayer and GlaxoSmithKline (2003).
19: Bernard L. Madoff Securities (2009).
20: Beverly Enterprises (2000).
21: Blodget, Henry (2003).
22: Boeing (2005).
23: Boeing (2004).
24: BP (2010).
25: Bridgestone and Ford (2001–2005).
26: Burlington Northern (2001).
27: Chiquita (2007).
28: ChoicePoint (2005).
29: Citigroup (2011 and 2012).
30: Coca-Cola (2001).
31: Computer Chip Manufacturers (Hynix, Infineon, and Samsung) (2004–2010).
32: Countrywide Financial and Angelo Mozilo (2010).
33: Dell (2010).
34: Dial (2003).
35: Dominion Energy (2003).
36: DuPont (2002–2011).
37: Eli Lilly (2009).
38: Enron Corporation (2006).
39: Equifax (2013).
40: ExxonMobil (2005).
41: Food Processors (ADM, Cargill, and Tate and Lyle) (1998–2004).
42: Galleon Group and Raj Rajaratnam (2011).
43: General Motors (1999–2003).
44: GlaxoSmithKline (2004).
45: GlaxoSmithKline (2012).
46: Goldman Sachs (2010).
47: Halliburton (2001–2005).
48: Hospital Corporation of America (2000 and 2002).
49: Hospital Corporation of America (2012).
50: HSBC (2012).
51: IBM (2004).
52: Invesco Funds (2004).
53: ITT (2007).
54: Johnson & Johnson (2011).
55: JPMorgan Chase (2013).
56: JPMorgan Chase (2013).
57: JPMorgan Chase (2011).
58: JPMorgan Chase and Credit Suisse (2012).
59: Koch Industries (2000).
60: KPMG (2005).
61: Lippo Group (2001).
62: Lucent (2004).
63: Medco (2006).
64: Merck (2007 and 2011).
65: Merrill Lynch (2012).
66: Microsoft (2001).
67: Microsoft (2003–2007).
68: Microsoft (2011).
69: Morgan Stanley (2004).
70: Mortgage-Holding Banks, Including Aurora Bank, Bank of America, Citibank, JPMorgan Chase, MetLife Bank, PNC, Sovereign, SunTrust, U.S. Bank, and Wells Fargo (2013).
71: National Century Financial Enterprises (2009).
72: National Football League (2013).
73: Natural Gas Producers (Anadarko, ChevronTexaco, ConocoPhillips, Devon, Exxon, and Kerr-McGee) (2007–2012).
74: New Century Financial (2007).
75: Newmont Mining (2006).
76: Nike (2003).
77: Orthopedic Firms (Biomet, DePuy Orthopedics, Smith & Nephew, Stryker Corporation, and Zimmer Holdings) (2007).
78: Petroleum Refiners (31 Companies) (2004–2007).
79: Pfizer (2009).
80: Philip Morris and R.J. Reynolds (2004 and 2010).
81: Ralphs Grocery (2006).
82: Royal Dutch Shell (2002–2009).
83: SAC Capital (2013).
84: Schering-Plough (2002 and 2006).
85: Serono (2005).
86: Taco Bell (2009).
87: Tenet Health Care Corporation (2006).
88: Tenet Health Care Corporation and Redding Medical Center (2004 and 2005).
89: UBS (2009).
90: United Technologies (2012).
91: Visa and MasterCard (2012).
92: Wall Street Analysts, Including Credit Suisse, First Boston, Merrill Lynch, Salomon Smith Barney (a Division of Citigroup), Bear Stearns, UBS Warburg, Goldman Sachs, Piper Jaffray, JPMorgan Chase, Lehman Brothers, Morgan Stanley (2003).
93: Walmart (2007–2010).
94: Wegelin & Company (2012).
95: WellPoint (2005).
96: Wells Fargo (2009).
97: Williams Companies, Inc. (2006).
98: Wood Products Manufacturers (Boise Cascade, Georgia-Pacific, Louisiana-Pacific, Weyerhaeuser, and Willamette) (1993–2002).
99: WorldCom CEO Bernard Ebbers (2005).
100: Wyeth (1997–2013).
Glossary.
Bibliography.
Index.
About the Authors.