eBook Encyclopedia Of Consumer Culture, 1st Edition

  • Published By: SAGE
  • ISBN-10: 1412994241
  • ISBN-13: 9781412994248
  • DDC: 306.3
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 1664 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2011 | Published/Released May 2012
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2011
  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Covers consuming societies around the world, from the Age of Enlightenment to the present, and shows how consumption has become intrinsic to the world's social, economic, political, and cultural landscapes.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Editorial Board.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
List of Entries.
Reader’s Guide.
About the Editor.
Contributors.
Introduction.
1: Acculturation.
2: Actor-Network Theory.
3: Addiction.
4: Adornment.
5: Adorno, Theodor (1903–1969).
6: Advertising.
7: Aesthetization of Everyday Life.
8: Aesthetics.
9: Affluent Society.
10: Age and Aging.
11: Air and Rail Travel.
12: Alienation.
13: Alternative Consumption.
14: Alternative Medicine.
15: Althusser, Louis (1918–1990).
16: American Dream.
17: Americanization.
18: Anomie.
19: Anorexia.
20: Anthropology.
21: Appropriation.
22: Architecture.
23: Art and Cultural Worlds.
24: Asceticism.
25: Attitude Surveys.
26: Attitude Theory.
27: Audience Research.
28: Authenticity.
29: Autoethnography.
30: Automobiles.
31: Bakhtin, Mikhail (1895–1975).
32: Barbie Dolls.
33: Barthes, Roland (1915–1980).
34: Bataille, Georges (1897–1962).
35: Baudrillard, Jean (1923–2007).
36: Beauty Myth.
37: Belonging.
38: Benjamin, Walter (1892–1940).
39: Bicycles.
40: Binge and Excess.
41: Body, The.
42: Body Shop, The.
43: Bollywood.
44: Bounded Rationality.
45: Bourdieu, Pierre (1930–2002).
46: Brandings.
47: Braudel, Fernand(1902–1985).
48: Bricolage.
49: British Empire.
50: Broadcast Media.
51: Capitalism.
52: Car Clusters.
53: Carbon Trading.
54: Car-Boot Sales and Flea Markets.
55: Caribbean and the Slave Trade.
56: Carnivals.
57: Celebrity.
58: Channels of Desire.
59: Childhood.
60: Christianity.
61: Christmas.
62: Cinema.
63: Circuits of Culture/Consumption.
64: Citizenship.
65: Civil Society.
66: Civilizing Processes.
67: Clothing Consumption.
68: Clubbing.
69: Coca-Cola.
70: Coffee.
71: Coffee Shops.
72: Cognitive Structures.
73: Cold War.
74: Collecting and Collectibles.
75: Collective Consumption.
76: Collective Identity.
77: Colonialism.
78: Comics.
79: Commercialization.
80: Commodification.
81: Commodities.
82: Communication Studies.
83: Companies as Consumers.
84: Comparing Consumer Cultures.
85: Confectionery.
86: Conspicuous Consumption.
87: Consumer Anxiety.
88: Consumer Apathy.
89: Consumer Behavior.
90: Consumer (Freedom of) Choice.
91: Consumer Co-Operatives.
92: Consumer Culture in Africa.
93: Consumer Culture in East Asia.
94: Consumer Culture in Latin America.
95: Consumer Culture in the USSR.
96: Consumer Demand.
97: Consumer Dissatisfaction.
98: Consumer Durables.
99: Consumer Education.
100: Consumer Expenditure Surveys.
101: Consumer Illnesses and Maladies.
102: Consumer Interviews.
103: Consumer Moods.
104: Consumer Nationalism.
105: Consumer Policy (China).
106: Consumer Policy (European Union).
107: Consumer Policy (Japan).
108: Consumer Policy (United States).
109: Consumer Policy (World Trade Organization).
110: Consumer Protest: Animal Welfare.
111: Consumer Protest: Anticapitalism.
112: Consumer Protest: Environment.
113: Consumer Protest: Water.
114: Consumer Regulation.
115: Consumer Revolution in Eighteenth-Century Britain.
116: Consumer Rights and the Law.
117: Consumer Socialization.
118: Consumer Society.
119: Consumer Sovereignty.
120: Consumer Testing and Protection Agencies.
121: Consuming the Environment.
122: Consumption and Time Use.
123: Consumption in Postsocialist China.
124: Consumption in Postsocialist Societies: Eastern Europe.
125: Consumption in the United States: Colonial Times to the Cold War.
126: Consumption Patterns and Trends.
127: Content Analysis.
128: Convenience.
129: Convention Theory.
130: Conversation Analysis.
131: Cool Hunters.
132: Cosmetic Surgery.
133: Cosmetics.
134: Cosmopolitanism.
135: Counterfeited Goods.
136: Craft Consumer.
137: Craft Production.
138: Credit.
139: Cultural Capital.
140: Cultural Flows.
141: Cultural Fragmentation.
142: Cultural Intermediaries.
143: Cultural Omnivores.
144: Cultural Studies.
145: Cultural Turn.
146: Culture Industries.
147: Culture Jamming.
148: Culture-Ideology of Consumerism.
149: Cyborgs.
150: Cycles of Production and Consumption.
151: Dandyism.
152: Databases and Consumers.
153: De Certeau, Michel (1925–1986).
154: Debt.
155: Decommodification.
156: Delocalization.
157: Dematerialization.
158: Department Stores.
159: Design.
160: Desire.
161: De-Skilling, Re-Skilling, and Up-Skilling.
162: Diaspora.
163: Diderot Effect.
164: Dieting.
165: Diffusion Studies and Trickle Down.
166: Dining Out.
167: Discount Stores.
168: Discourse.
169: Discourse Analysis.
170: Disney.
171: Disorganized Capitalism.
172: Division of Labor.
173: Do-It-Yourself.
174: Domestic Division of Labor.
175: Domestic Services.
176: Domestic Technologies.
177: Douglas, Mary (1921–2007).
178: Downshifting.
179: Durkheim, Émile (1858–1917).
180: Eco-Labeling.
181: E-Commerce.
182: Econometrics.
183: Economic Indicators.
184: Economic Psychology.
185: Economic Sociology.
186: Economics.
187: Electronic Point of Sale (EPOS).
188: Electronic Video Gaming.
189: Elias, Norbert (1897–1990).
Half Title Page.
Editorial Board.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
List of Entries.
1: Fair Trade.
2: False Consciousness/False Needs.
3: Families.
4: Family Meal.
5: Famine.
6: Fans.
7: Fashion.
8: Fashion Forecasters.
9: Fashion Industry.
10: Femininity.
11: Feminism and Women’s Magazines.
12: Feminist Movement.
13: Fine Arts.
14: Flaneur/Euse.
15: Focus Groups.
16: Food Consumption.
17: Food Scares.
18: Franchising.
19: Freud, Sigmund (1856–1939).
20: Friendship.
21: Galbraith, John Kenneth (1908–2006).
22: Gambling.
23: Gardening.
24: Gender.
25: Gender Advertising.
26: Gender and the Media.
27: Gendering of Public and Private Space.
28: Generation.
29: Geography.
30: Ghettos.
31: Gifts and Reciprocity.
32: Glastonbury/Woodstock.
33: Global Cities.
34: Global Institutions.
35: Globalization.
36: Glocalization.
37: Goal-Directed Consumption.
38: Goffman, Erving (1922–1982).
39: Governmentality.
40: Gramsci, Antonio (1891–1937).
41: Grand Tour.
42: Great Depression (U.S.).
43: Habitus.
44: Hair Care/Hairdressing.
45: Happiness.
46: Harried Leisure Class.
47: Health Care.
48: Hedonism.
49: Hegemony.
50: Hierarchy of Needs.
51: Higher Education.
52: Hinduism.
53: Hire-Purchase and Rental Goods.
54: Historical Analysis.
55: History.
56: History of Food.
57: Hobbyists and Amateurs.
58: Hollywood.
59: Home Computer.
60: Horkheimer, Max (1895–1973).
61: Household Budgets.
62: Households.
63: Hyperreality.
64: Identity.
65: Imaginative Hedonism.
66: Inalienable Wealth/Inalienable Possessions.
67: Income.
68: Individualization.
69: Industrial Society.
70: Inequalities.
71: Informal Economy.
72: Informalization.
73: Information Society.
74: Information Technology.
75: Informational Capital.
76: Infrastructures and Utilities.
77: Inheritance.
78: Innovation Studies.
79: Internet.
80: Interpellation.
81: Inventing Tradition.
82: Islam.
83: Italian Fascism and Fashion.
84: Japan as a Consumer Culture.
85: Jeans.
86: Kant, Immanuel (1724–1804).
87: Keynes, Jhon Maynard(1883–1946).
88: Keynesian Demand Management.
89: Kyark, Hazel (1886–1957).
90: Labour Markets.
91: Jasch, Christopher (1932–1994).
92: Lazarsfeld, Paul Felix (1901–1976).
93: Lefebvre, Henri (1901–1991).
94: Leisure.
95: Leisure Studies.
96: Lévi-Strauss, Claude (1908–2009).
97: Licensing of Clothing Brands.
98: Life Course.
99: Life(style) Politics.
100: Lifestyle.
101: Lifestyle Typologies.
102: Likert Scales.
103: Liminality.
104: Linder, Staffan Burenstam (1931–2000).
105: Locality.
106: Longitudinal Studies.
107: Luxury and Luxuries.
108: Luxury Taxes.
109: Lyotard, Jean-François (1924–1998).
110: Mandeville, Bernard (1670–1733).
111: Marcuse, Herbert (1898–1979).
112: Markets and Marketing.
113: Marshall, Alfred (1842–1924).
114: Marx, Karl (1818–1883).
115: Marxist Theories.
116: Masculinity.
117: Maslow, Abraham (1908–1970).
118: Mass Culture (Frankfurt School).
119: Mass Observation.
120: Mass Production and Consumption.
121: Mass Tourism.
122: Material Culture.
123: Materialism and Postmaterialism.
124: Mauss, Marcel (1872–1950).
125: McDonaldization.
126: McLuhan, Marshall (1911–1980).
127: Mead, George Herbert (1863–1931).
128: Measuring Satisfaction.
129: Measuring Standards of Living.
130: Measuring the Environmental Impact of Consumption.
131: Media Convergence and Monopoly.
132: Medieval Consumption.
133: Memorials.
134: Memory.
135: Men’s Magazines.
136: Methodologies for Studying Consumer Culture.
137: Methods of Market Research.
138: Metropole.
139: Metrosexual.
140: Migration.
141: Mimesis.
142: Mobile Media Gadgets of the Analog Age.
143: Mobile Phones.
144: Modernization Theory.
145: Money.
146: Moral Economy.
147: Moral geography.
148: Moralities.
149: Motivation Research.
150: Multiculturalism.
151: Multiple Correspondence Analysis.
152: Multisited Ethnography.
153: Multivariate Analysis.
154: Narcissism.
155: National Cultures.
156: Needs and Wants.
157: Neo-Tribes.
158: Network Society.
159: Neuromarketing.
160: New Right.
161: Nostalgia.
162: Novelty.
163: Obesity.
164: Object Biography.
165: Obsession.
166: Opinion Leaders.
167: Opinion Polls.
168: Opium Trade.
169: Ordinary Consumption.
170: Organ and Blood Donations.
171: Organic Food.
172: Orientalism.
173: Othering.
174: Outsourcing.
Half Title Page.
Editorial Board.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
List of Entries.
1: Packaging.
2: Patten, Simon Nelson (1852–1922).
3: Performing Arts/Performance Arts.
4: Personals/Personal Ads.
5: Philanthropy.
6: Philosophy.
7: Photography and Video.
8: Pink Pounds/Dollars.
9: Planned Obsolescence.
10: Political and Ethical Consumption.
11: Political Economy.
12: Political Science.
13: Popular Music.
14: Porcelain.
15: Positional Goods.
16: Postcolonial Theory.
17: Post-Fordism.
18: Postindustrial Society.
19: Postmodernism.
20: Post-Structuralism.
21: Potlach.
22: Poverty.
23: Preference Formation.
24: Price and Price Mechanisms.
25: Print Media.
26: Product Loss Leaders.
27: Product Placements.
28: Production of Culture.
29: Promotional Culture.
30: Prosumption.
31: Protestant Ethic.
32: Psychoanalysis.
33: Psychology.
34: Public Goods.
35: Public Sphere.
36: Pubs and Wine Bars.
37: Quality of Life.
38: Queer Theory.
39: Radio.
40: Rationalization.
41: Rationing.
42: Reality TV.
43: Reception Theory.
44: Recreation.
45: Reification.
46: Renewable Resources.
47: Resistance.
48: Responsible Consumption.
49: Retirement.
50: Retro.
51: Reuse/Recycling.
52: Risk Society.
53: Rituals.
54: Romantic Love.
55: Rostow, Walt Whitman (1916–2003).
56: Routines and Habits.
57: Sacred and Profane.
58: Satiation.
59: Scarcity.
60: Sears, Roebuck and Company.
61: Seaside Resorts.
62: Second Life.
63: Seduced and Repressed.
64: Self-Interest.
65: Self-Presentation.
66: Self-Reflexivity.
67: Self-Service Economy.
68: Semiotics.
69: Senses.
70: Service Industry.
71: Sex.
72: Sex Tourism.
73: Sexuality.
74: Shopping.
75: Silverstone, Roger (1945–2006).
76: Simmel, Georg (1858–1918).
77: Simulacrum.
78: Single-Person Households.
79: Slow Food Movement.
80: Smith, Adam (1723–1790).
81: Smuggling and Black Markets.
82: Sneakers/Trainers.
83: Soap Operas and Telenovelas.
84: Sociability.
85: Social and Economic Development.
86: Social Class.
87: Social Distinction.
88: Social Exclusion.
89: Social Movements.
90: Social Network Analysis.
91: Social Networks.
92: Social Shaping of Technology.
93: Socialism and Consumption.
94: Sociology.
95: Sociotechnical Systems.
96: Sombart, Werner (1863–1941).
97: Souvenirs.
98: Spaces and Places.
99: Spaces of Shopping.
100: Spas.
101: Spatial Analysis.
102: Spectacles.
103: Spices.
104: Sports.
105: State Provisioning.
106: Status.
107: Store Loyalty Cards.
108: Structuralism.
109: Style.
110: Subaltern.
111: Subculture.
112: Suburbia.
113: Subversion.
114: Sugar.
115: Sumptuary Laws.
116: Supermarkets.
117: Supermodels.
118: Surplus Value.
119: Surrealism.
120: Surveys.
121: Symbolic Capital.
122: Symbolic Value.
123: Symbolic Violence.
124: Systems of Provision.
125: Taboo.
126: Tamed Hedonism.
127: Taste.
128: Tea.
129: Teenage Magazines.
130: Telephones.
131: Television.
132: Textiles.
133: Textual Poachers.
134: Theories of Practice.
135: Theory of Planned Behavior.
136: Thrift.
137: Time-Use Diaries.
138: Tobacco.
139: Totemism.
140: Tourism Studies.
141: Tourist Gaze.
142: Toys.
143: Trade Standards.
144: Trademarks.
145: Transnational Capitalism.
146: Trust.
147: T-Shirts.
148: Tupperware.
149: Typologies of Shoppers.
150: Urban Cultures.
151: Urbanization.
152: Value: Exchange and Use Value.
153: Veblen, Thorstein Bunde (1857–1929).
154: Virtual Communities.
155: Visual Culture.
156: Voluntary Associations.
157: Voting Behaviors.
158: Walkmans and Ipods.
159: Walmart.
160: Waste.
161: Weber, Max (1864–1920).
162: Weddings.
163: Well-Being.
164: Wine.
165: Women’s Magazines.
166: Work-and-Spend Cycle.
167: World Exhibitions.
168: World-Systems Analysis.
169: Youth Culture.
170: Zoos and Wildlife Parks.
Index.