eBook Physics Explained: The Britannica Guide to Relativity and Quantum Mechanics, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1615303839
  • ISBN-13: 9781615303830
  • DDC: 530.11
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - 12th Grade
  • 270 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2011 | Published/Released April 2012
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2011
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About

Overview

The oft-referenced “E = mc2” may perhaps be one of the world's most famous equations, but it actually represents only one aspect of the complex branch of physics known as relativity. Together, relativity and quantum mechanics explain both the most cosmic and most elementary relationships and processes of the universe. The profound place that relativity and quantum mechanics occupy in subverting longstanding notions about space, time, matter, and more and the brilliant individuals who advanced study in these fields are the subjects of this volume.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Introduction.
1: Relativity.
2: The Mechanical Universe.
3: Light and the Ether.
4: Special Relativity.
5: Einstein's Gedankenexperiments.
6: Starting Points and Postulates.
7: Relativistic Space and Time.
8: Relativistic Mass.
9: Cosmic Speed Limit.
10: E = mc2.
11: The Twin Paradox.
12: Four-Dimensional Space-Time.
13: Experimental Evidence for Special Relativity.
14: General Relativity.
15: Principle of Equivalence.
16: Curved Space-Time and Geometric Gravitation.
17: The Mathematics of General Relativity.
18: Cosmological Solutions.
19: Black Holes.
20: Experimental Evidence for General Relativity.
21: Unconfirmed Predictions of General Relativity.
22: Gravitational Waves.
23: Black Holes and Wormholes.
24: Applications of Relativistic Ideas.
25: Elementary Particles.
26: Particle Accelerators.
27: Fission and Fusion: Bombs and Stellar Processes.
28: The Global Positioning System.
29: Cosmology.
30: Relativity, Quantum Theory, and Unified Theories.
31: Intellectual and Cultural Impact of Relativity.
32: Quantum Mechanics: Concepts.
33: Historical Basis of Quantum Theory.
34: Early Developments.
35: Planck's Radiation Law.
36: Einstein and the Photoelectric Effect.
37: Bohr's Theory of the Atom.
38: Scattering of X-rays.
39: Broglie's Wave Hypothesis.
40: Basic Concepts and Methods.
41: Schrödinger's Wave Mechanics.
42: Electron Spin and Antiparticles.
43: Identical Particles and Multielectron Atoms.
44: Time-Dependent Schrödinger Equation.
45: Tunneling.
46: Axiomatic Approach.
47: Incompatible Observables.
48: Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle.
49: Quantum Electrodynamics.
50: Quantum Mechanics: Interpretation.
51: The Electron: Wave or Particle?.
52: Hidden Variables.
53: Paradox of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen.
54: Measurement in Quantum Mechanics.
55: Applications of Quantum Mechanics.
56: Decay of a Meson.
57: Cesium Clock.
58: A Quantum Voltage Standard.
59: Bose-Einstein Condensate.
60: Biographies.
61: Carl David Anderson.
62: Hans Bethe.
63: David Bohm.
64: Niels Bohr.
65: Max Born.
66: Satyendra Nath Bose.
67: Louis-Victor, 7E Duke de Broglie.
68: Edward Uhler Condon.
69: Clinton Joseph Davisson.
70: P.A.M. Dirac.
71: Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington.
72: Albert Einstein.
73: Enrico Fermi.
74: Richard P. Feynman.
75: Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Friedmann.
76: George Gamow.
77: Hans Geiger.
78: Murray Gell-Mann.
79: Walther Gerlach.
80: Lester Halbert Germer.
81: Samuel Abraham Goudsmit.
82: Werner Heisenberg.
83: Pascual Jordan.
84: Brian D. Josephson.
85: Max von Laue.
86: Hendrik Antoon Lorentz.
87: Ernst Mach.
88: A.A. Michelson.
89: Hermann Minkowski.
90: Edward Williams Morley.
91: Wolfgang Pauli.
92: Max Planck.
93: Henri Poincaré.
94: Erwin Schrödinger.
95: Karl Schwarzschild.
96: Julian Seymour Schwinger.
97: Arnold Sommerfeld.
98: Otto Stern.
99: Tomonaga Shin'Ichirō.
100: George Eugene Uhlenbeck.
101: Wilhelm Wien.
Conclusion.
Glossary.
Bibliography.
Index.