eBook Disco, Punk, New Wave, Heavy Metal, and More: Music in the 1970s and 1980s, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1615309128
  • ISBN-13: 9781615309122
  • DDC: 781.6309
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - 12th Grade
  • 264 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2013 | Published/Released August 2013
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2013
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About

Overview

Although rock music continued to dominate the music scene, the sounds of the 1970s and ‘80s differed greatly from the music of the preceding decades, reflecting newer social realities. The aggressive sounds of punk music began to appeal to youth, while disco reached across cultures and brought diverse crowds together in dance clubs. New Wave had a playful, chill feel, while the electronic guitar-laden sounds heavy metal were anything but. Readers examine the various styles of music that defined the 1970s and ‘80s, profiling the artists who captured the spirit of rapid social and cultural change.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Introduction.
1: Life After Woodstock.
2: Rock Goes Mainstream.
3: Rock on the Airwaves.
4: Dj Culture.
5: The Makings of a Classic.
6: Led Zeppelin.
7: Queen.
8: Traffic.
9: Bruce Springsteen.
10: Fleetwood Mac.
11: Sir Paul Mccartney.
12: Bob Seger.
13: Steely Dan.
14: Boston.
15: Tom Petty.
16: The Allman Brothers Band.
17: Lynyrd Skynyrd.
18: ZZ Top.
19: Heavy Metal Thunder.
20: Black Sabbath.
21: AC/DC.
22: Alice Cooper.
23: Aerosmith.
24: Van Halen.
25: Def Leppard.
26: Guns N' Roses.
27: Metallica.
28: The Sounds of So-Cal: Country Rock.
29: The Flying Burrito Brothers.
30: The Eagles.
31: Linda Ronstadt.
32: Poco.
33: The Song-Poets: Singer-Songwriters.
34: John Lennon.
35: George Harrison.
36: Paul Simon.
37: Neil Young.
38: Joni Mitchell.
39: Carly Simon.
40: James Taylor.
41: Emmylou Harris.
42: Laura Nyro.
43: Isaac Hayes.
44: Harry Chapin.
45: Lou Reed.
46: Jackson Browne.
47: Randy Newman.
48: Steve Earle.
49: Neil Diamond.
50: Tom Waits.
51: Joan Armatrading.
52: Michael McDonald.
53: Billy Bragg.
54: Songwriting Goes Pop.
55: Classical Influences: Art Rock and Progressive Rock.
56: The Moody Blues.
57: Yes.
58: Genesis.
59: Peter Gabriel.
60: Emerson, Lake and Palmer.
61: Roxy Music.
62: Kate Bush.
63: Fierce Fusion: Jazz-Rock.
64: Chicago.
65: Earth, Wind and Fire.
66: Herbie Hancock.
67: Tear the Roof off: Funk.
68: Parliament-Funkadelic.
69: Sly and the Family Stone.
70: The Ohio Players.
71: Kool and the Gang.
72: Sound and Spectacle: Glam Rock.
73: David Bowie.
74: The New York Dolls.
75: Down to Earth: Pub Rock.
76: Dire Straits.
77: Billy Thorpe.
78: Lobby Loyde.
79: Rude Boys: Reggae.
80: Sir Coxsone Dodd.
81: Toots and the Maytals.
82: Bob Marley.
83: Lee (“Scratch”) Perry.
84: Peter Tosh.
85: Jimmy Cliff.
86: Desmond Dekker.
87: Roots of Reggae: Ska.
88: Dancehall Music.
89: Dance Fever: Disco.
90: Donna Summer.
91: Musicland Studios.
92: The Bee Gees.
93: RAK Records.
94: Casablanca Records.
95: Barry White.
96: Europop.
97: ABBA.
98: Diy: Punk and New Wave.
99: Proto-Punk in the Motor City.
100: The MC5.
101: Iggy and the Stooges.
102: Rock Rebels Against Itself: Punk.
103: Romantics, Postpunks, and Miserabilists: New Wave.
Conclusion.
Glossary.
Bibliography.
Index.