eBook The Britannica Guide to Literary Elements: Prose, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1615305432
  • ISBN-13: 9781615305438
  • DDC: 808
  • Grade Level Range: 10th Grade - 12th Grade
  • 264 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2012 | Published/Released April 2012
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2012
  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Narratives come in many forms, fall into many genres, and tell the stories of an endless assortment of characters. Despite recurring themes and conceits in works from around the world, each story--from biography to science fiction--is singular and designed to elicit a distinct emotional response from its readers. The rhetorical tools and literary styles that have helped reinvent the art and study of storytelling over time are surveyed in this captivating volume.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Introduction.
1: Novel.
2: Elements.
3: Plot.
4: Character.
5: Scene, or Setting.
6: Émile Zola.
7: Narrative Method and Point of View.
8: Scope, or Dimension.
9: Myth, Symbolism, Significance.
10: Uses.
11: Interpretation of Life.
12: Entertainment or Escape.
13: Propaganda.
14: Harriet Beecher Stowe.
15: Reportage.
16: Agent of Change in Language and Thought.
17: Expression of the Spirit of Its Age.
18: Creator of Lifestyle and Arbiter of Taste.
19: Style.
20: Romanticism.
21: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley.
22: Realism.
23: Naturalism.
24: Impressionism.
25: Expressionism.
26: Avant-Gardism.
27: Jorge Luis Borges.
28: Novel: Terms and Concepts.
29: Apprenticeship Novel.
30: Bildungsroman.
31: Dime Novel.
32: Epistolary Novel.
33: Gothic Novel.
34: Ann Radcliffe.
35: Historical Novel.
36: I Novel.
37: Indianista Novel.
38: New Novel.
39: Nonfiction Novel.
40: Novel of Manners.
41: Jane Austen.
42: Novella.
43: Picaresque Novel.
44: Psychological Novel.
45: Roman À Clef.
46: Sentimental Novel.
47: Social Problem Novel.
48: Stream of Consciousness.
49: Western.
50: James Fenimore Cooper.
51: Science Fiction.
52: The World of Science Fiction.
53: The Antecedents of Science Fiction.
54: Proto-Science Fiction and Jules Verne.
55: Classic British Science Fiction.
56: Mass Markets and Juvenile Science Fiction.
57: The “Golden Age” of Science Fiction.
58: Soviet Science Fiction.
59: Major Science Fiction Themes.
60: Utopias and Dystopias.
61: Alternative Societies.
62: Sex and Gender.
63: Ursula K. Le Guin.
64: Alien Encounters.
65: Space Travel.
66: Time Travel.
67: Alternate Histories and Parallel Universes.
68: High Technologies.
69: Science Fiction: Terms and Concepts.
70: Fantasy.
71: J.K. Rowling.
72: Hugo Awards.
73: Nebula Awards.
74: Fable, Parable, and Allegory.
75: Allegory and Myth.
76: The Allegorical Mode.
77: John Bunyan.
78: Fable.
79: Parable.
80: Derivation of the Terms.
81: Objectives of the Fable.
82: Objectives of the Parable.
83: Allegory.
84: Diversity of Forms.
85: Diversity of Media.
86: Allegory and Cosmology.
87: Development of the Fable in the West.
88: Beast Epic.
89: George Orwell.
90: Influence of Jean de la Fontaine.
91: Development of the Parable in the West.
92: Development of the Allegory in the West.
93: Hebrew Bible (Old Testament).
94: The Greeks.
95: Blending of Rival Systems: The Middle Ages.
96: The Renaissance.
97: The Modern Period.
98: Allegorical Literature in the East.
99: India.
100: China.
101: Japan.
102: Fable, Allegory, and Parable: Terms and Concepts.
103: Bestiary.
104: Dream Allegory.
105: Emblem Book.
106: Exemplum.
107: Personification.
108: Proverb.
109: Reynard the Fox.
110: Romance.
111: The Component Elements.
112: Style and Subject Matter.
113: Developing Psychological Awareness.
114: Sources and Parallels.
115: Geoffrey of Monmouth.
116: The Marvelous.
117: The Setting.
118: Medieval Verse Romances.
119: Arthurian Romance and the Matter of Britain.
120: The Influence of Chrétien de Troyes.
121: Chrétien de Troyes.
122: Love as a Major Theme.
123: Medieval Prose Romances.
124: Arthurian Themes.
125: Structure.
126: Later Developments.
127: The Spread and Popularity of Romance Literature.
128: The Decline of Romance.
129: The 18th-Century Romantic Revival.
130: Romance: Terms and Concepts.
131: Alexander Romance.
132: Chanson de Geste.
133: Chantefable.
134: Courtly Love.
135: Hellenistic Romance.
136: Romance of ‘Antar.
137: Saga.
138: Nonfictional Saga Literature.
139: Translations.
140: Native Historical Accounts.
141: Legendary and Historical Fiction.
142: Kings' Sagas.
143: Legendary Sagas.
144: Sagas of Icelanders.
145: Njáls Saga.
146: Saga: Terms and Concepts.
147: Fornaldarsǫgur.
148: Hero.
149: Heroic Prose.
150: Legend.
151: Scéla.
152: Vikings.
153: Short Story.
154: Analysis of the Genre.
155: Origins.
156: From Egypt to India.
157: The Greeks.
158: Middle Ages, Renaissance, and After.
159: Proliferation of Forms.
160: Refinement.
161: Spreading Popularity.
162: Decline of Short Fiction.
163: Emergence of the Modern Short Story.
164: The 19th Century.
165: The “Impressionist” Story.
166: Respect for the Story.
167: French Writers.
168: Russian Writers.
169: Nikolay Gogol.
170: The 20th Century and After.
171: Short Story: Terms and Concepts.
172: Conte.
173: Detective Story.
174: Dilemma Tale.
175: Frame Story.
176: In Medias Res.
177: Interior Monologue.
178: Virginia Woolf.
179: Irony.
180: Literary Sketch.
181: Maqāmah.
182: Al-Hamadhānī.
183: Mystery Story.
184: Satire.
185: Historical Definitions.
186: Influence of Horace and Juvenal.
187: Jonathan Swift.
188: Structure of Verse Satire.
189: The Satiric Spirit.
190: Satirical Literature.
191: The Satirist, the Law, and Society.
192: Satire: Terms and Concepts.
193: Anatomy.
194: Burlesque.