eBook Encyclopedia of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 1st Edition

  • Robert C. Eklund
  • Published By: SAGE
  • ISBN-10: 1483332217
  • ISBN-13: 9781483332215
  • DDC: 796.03
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 880 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2014 | Published/Released March 2014
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2014
  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

How do athletes overcome fears, slumps, mental blocks, or injuries? How do they deal with stress and anxiety, be it from competitors, teammates, audiences, parents, coaches, or themselves? What psychological techniques prove effective in mental training for peak performance, maintaining concentration, motivation, and competitive drive? How can an athlete enhance his or her commitment to a training regimen, or how might the average person better adhere to a program of fitness and exercise? Readers will find answers to these questions and more in the Encyclopedia of Sport and Exercise Psychology.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Editorial Board.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
List of Entries.
Reader’s Guide.
About the Editors.
Contributors.
Introduction.
1: Achievement Goal Theory.
2: Achievement Motive Theory.
3: Adaptation.
4: Adapted Physical Education.
5: Addiction, Effects of Exercise On.
6: Adherence.
7: Affect.
8: Affective Disorders.
9: Affective Responses to Exercise.
10: Affirmations.
11: Aggression.
12: Alcohol Abuse.
13: Anticipation.
14: Assimilation.
15: Athlete Leadership.
16: Attachment Theory and Coaching.
17: Attention Theory.
18: Attention Training.
19: Attentional Association and Dissociation.
20: Attentional Focus.
21: Attention–Performance Relationships.
22: Attribution Theory.
23: Automaticity.
24: Automaticity: Evaluative Priming.
25: Automaticity: Implicit Attitudes.
26: Autonomic Nervous System.
27: Autonomy-Supportive Coaching.
28: Basic Emotions in Sport.
29: Biofeedback, Neurofeedback.
30: Biopsychosocial Model of Injury.
31: Body Awareness.
32: Body Dissatisfaction.
33: Body Dysmorphic Disorder, Muscle Dysmorphia.
34: Body Image.
35: Body Self-Esteem.
36: Brain.
37: Brain Imaging.
38: Breathing Exercises.
39: Burnout.
40: CALO-RE Taxonomy of Behavior Change Techniques.
41: Cardiac Function.
42: Career Assistance Programs.
43: Career Paths.
44: Career Transitions.
45: Caring Climate.
46: Centering.
47: Certifications.
48: Character Development.
49: Cheating.
50: Choking.
51: Chunking/Dechunking.
52: Coach–Athlete Relations.
53: Coaching Efficacy.
54: Cognitive Capabilities.
55: Cognitive Function.
56: Cognitive Restructuring.
57: Cognitive Styles.
58: Cognitive Task Analysis.
59: Cohesion.
60: Collective Efficacy.
61: Collectivism/Individualism.
62: Commitment.
63: Competence Motivation Theory.
64: Competition.
65: Concentration.
66: Concentration Skills.
67: Conflict.
68: Conformity.
69: Consultant Effectiveness, Assessment of.
70: Consulting.
71: Control Theory.
72: Coordination.
73: Coping.
74: Credentials.
75: Cue Utilization.
76: Cultural Competence.
77: Cultural Safety.
78: Decision Making.
79: Decision-Making Styles in Coaching.
80: Developmental Considerations.
81: Developmental Histories.
82: Diet Drugs.
83: Disability.
84: Disability and Exercise.
85: Disability and Sport.
86: Disability Coaching.
87: Diversity.
88: Drop-Out.
89: Drug Use and Control.
90: Dual-Process Theory.
91: Dual-Task Paradigm.
92: Dynamical Systems.
93: Eating Disorders.
94: Ecological Theory.
95: Effort.
96: Electroencephalograph (EEG).
97: Electromyography (EMG).
98: Emotional Reactivity.
99: Emotional Responses.
100: Emotional Schemas.
101: Energizing (Activation) Strategies.
102: Energy, Effects of Exercise on.
103: Enjoyment.
104: Enjoyment, as Mediator of Exercise Behavior Change.
105: Errors.
106: Especial Skills.
107: Ethics.
108: Ethnicity.
109: Exercise Dependence.
110: Expectancy-Value Theory.
111: Expertise.
112: Extraversion–Introversion.
113: Eye Movements/Gaze.
114: Fair Play.
115: Fatigue.
116: Feedback.
117: Female Athlete Triad.
118: Feminism.
119: Flow.
120: Freezing.
121: Friendships/Peer Relations.
122: Functional Variability.
123: Gender.
124: Generalized Motor Program.
125: Genetics/Nature–Nurture Determinants.
126: Goal Setting.
127: Group Characteristics.
128: Group Formation.
129: Habit.
130: Health Action Process Approach.
131: Health Belief Model.
132: Health Promotion.
133: Hedonic Theory.
134: Heterosexism, Homonegativism, and Transprejudice.
135: Hierarchical Self.
136: History of Exercise Psychology.
137: History of Sport Psychology.
138: Home Advantage.
139: Human Factors.
140: Humor.
141: Hypnosis.
142: Iceberg Profile.
143: Identity.
144: Imagery.
145: Implicit/Self-Theories of Ability.
146: Individual Response Stereotype.
147: Information Processing.
148: Injury, Psychological Susceptibility to.
149: Injury, Return to Competition Following.
150: Interdependence Theory and the Coach–Athlete Relationship.
151: Interference.
152: Interventions for Exercise and Physical Activity.
153: Intrinsic/Extrinsic Motivation, Hierarchical Model Of.
154: Knowledge Structure.
155: Laws of Movement Learning and Control.
156: Leadership in Sport: Multidimensional Model.
157: Leadership in Sport: Situational and Contingency Approaches.
158: Leadership in Sport: Social Cognitive Approaches.
159: Leadership in Sport: Trait Perspectives.
160: Leadership in Sport: Transactional and Transformational.
161: Learning.
162: Limbic System.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
1: Mastery and Control Beliefs.
2: Memory.
3: Mental Blocks.
4: Mental Health.
5: Mental Rehearsal.
6: Mental Toughness.
7: Mentoring.
8: Mindfulness.
9: Mirror Neurons.
10: Modeling.
11: Models of Emotion–Performance.
12: Moral Atmosphere.
13: Moral Behavior.
14: Moral Development.
15: Moral Disengagement.
16: Moral Judgment.
17: Moral Reasoning.
18: Moral Values and Attitudes.
19: Motor Commands.
20: Motor Control.
21: Motor Development.
22: Motor Learning.
23: Movement.
24: Multiculturalism.
25: Multimodal Mental Training.
26: Multiple Behavior Change.
27: Music-Based Interventions.
28: Narcotic Analgesics.
29: Neurologic Disorders.
30: Neuroscience, Exercise, and Cognitive Function.
31: Norms.
32: Obesity.
33: Optimism.
34: Overtraining Syndrome.
35: Parenting.
36: Participation Motives.
37: Passion.
38: Pattern Recognition and Recall.
39: Perception.
40: Perfectionism.
41: Performance-Enhancing Drugs.
42: Personality and Psychological Characteristics of Athletes.
43: Personality Tests.
44: Personality Traits and Exercise.
45: Pleasure.
46: Positive Thinking.
47: Possible Selves.
48: Practice.
49: Preperformance Routines.
50: Priming.
51: Probabilities.
52: Protection Motivation Theory.
53: Psychological Consequences of Sport Injury.
54: Psychological Skills.
55: Psychological Skills Training.
56: Psychological Well-Being.
57: Psychopharmacology.
58: Psychophysiology.
59: Quality of Life.
60: Race.
61: Racism/Whiteness.
62: Recognition and Recall Paradigms.
63: Recreational Drugs.
64: Reinforcement and Punishment.
65: Relational Efficacy Beliefs in Coach–Athlete Relations.
66: Relaxation.
67: Resilience.
68: Resistance Training.
69: Response.
70: Rest.
71: Retention.
72: Roles.
73: Runner’s High.
74: Satisfaction.
75: Sedentary Behavior.
76: Self-Acceptance.
77: Self-Appraisal/Assessment/ Perception.
78: Self-Awareness.
79: Self-Awareness Theory.
80: Self-Categorization Theory.
81: Self-Compassion.
82: Self-Conscious Emotions.
83: Self-Construal.
84: Self-Criticism.
85: Self-Determination Theory.
86: Self-Discrepancy.
87: Self-Doubt.
88: Self-Efficacy.
89: Self-Fulfilling Prophecy.
90: Self-Handicapping.
91: Self-Monitoring.
92: Self-Objectification.
93: Self-Presentation.
94: Self-Regulation.
95: Self-Schema.
96: Self-Talk.
97: Sensorimotor Representations.
98: Sensory Systems: Auditory, Tactile, Proprioceptive.
99: Services.
100: Sex Differences.
101: Shared Mental Models.
102: Simulation Training.
103: Situational Awareness.
104: Skill Acquisition.
105: Sleep and Exercise.
106: Social Cognitive Theory.
107: Social Comparative Emotions.
108: Social Comparison.
109: Social Identity Theory.
110: Social Marketing and Message Framing.
111: Social Neuroscience.
112: Social Physique Anxiety.
113: Social Processing Effects.
114: Sport Psychiatry.
115: Sportspersonship.
116: Status.
117: Stereotype Threat.
118: Stereotyping, Cultural/Ethnic/Racial.
119: Strength Model of Self-Control.
120: Stress Management.
121: Stress Reactivity.
122: Supervision.
123: Support Group.
124: Talent Development.
125: Task Constraints.
126: Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Model.
127: Team Attributions.
128: Team Building.
129: Team Communication.
130: Theory of Planned Behavior.
131: Thought Stopping.
132: Timing.
133: Training, Professional.
134: Transcranial Magnetic Simulation (TMS).
135: Transfer.
136: Transformational Parenting.
137: Transition.
138: Transtheoretical Model.
139: Type A/B Personality.
140: Underrecovery Syndrome.
141: Verbal Protocols.
142: Vision.
143: Yips.
144: Youth Sport, Participation Trends in.
Timeline: History of Sport and Exercise Psychology.
Index.

Meet the Author

Author Bio

Robert C. Eklund

Robert C. Eklund was involved in the development of the revised flow scales (Jackson & Eklund, 2002). He also worked extensively on the evaluation of psychometric properties of other inventories commonly employed in sport and exercise psychology including the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (e.g., Eklund, Mack, & Hart, 1996), the Physical Self Perception Profile (e.g., Eklund, Whitehead, & Welk, 1997), the Causal Dimension Scale-II (Crocker, Eklund, & Graham, 2002), and inventories employed to evaluate coping strategies (Eklund, Grove, & Heard, 1998; Grove, Eklund & Heard, 1997). While widely published, Eklund has also been active in editorial roles in the field. In addition to being the current editor-in-chief of the Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, Eklund is a past associate/section editor for Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, and the Journal of Applied Sport Psychology. Eklund currently serves on the editorial boards of other sport and exercise psychology journals.