eBook Daily Life Through American History In Primary Documents, 1st Edition

  • Randall M. Miller
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1610690338
  • ISBN-13: 9781610690331
  • DDC: 973
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 1650 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2012 | Published/Released March 2012
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2012
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About

Overview

Presents a large sweep of American history through the voices of the American people themselves. This work explores the daily lives of American people from colonial times to the present through primary documents that include diaries, letters, memoirs, speeches, sermons, pamphlets, and all manner of public and private writings from the people.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
About the Book.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Set Introduction.
Acknowledgments.
Chronology of Selected Events, 1492–1782.
1: Historical Overview.
2: Domestic Life.
3: Indian and Settler Relations in Early Virginia.
4: John Smith on the Settlement at Jamestown (1608).
5: Powhatan on John Smith and the English Settlement at Jamestown (ca. 1609).
6: John Rolfe, Letter Asking Permission to Marry Pocahontas (1614).
7: The Massacre of 1622.
8: The Indians of Virginia (1705).
9: Sending Wives and Servants to Early Virginia and Maryland.
10: The Virginia Company Sends Women to Virginia (1622).
11: Indenture of Servitude for Transportation to Virginia (1622).
12: An Indentured Servant's Letter to His Parents (1623).
13: John Hammond's Leah and Rachel, on Conditions in the Chesapeake Colonies (1656).
14: Plantation Life in Maryland.
15: A Dutch Traveler's Account of Plantation Life in Maryland (1679).
16: Food and Fare among Planters, Servants, and Artisans.
17: Dinner at the Governor's Mansion in Annapolis (1744).
18: An Artisan's and a Farmer's Regular Fare and Dress in Virginia (1740s–1760s).
19: Slave Resistance.
20: Slave Conspiracy in Virginia (1709).
21: A Camp of “Free Blacks” in North Carolina (1728).
22: Barn Burnings in South Carolina (1732).
23: Runaway Slave Advertisement from the Virginia Gazette (1767).
24: The Slave's Day on a Virginia Tobacco Plantation (1770s).
25: Servant Life in the Northern Colonies.
26: Beating a Maid in Massachusetts Bay Colony (1639).
27: Indenture of Servitude for Ship Passage (1696).
28: Indentured Servitude and Adjusting to Life in Pennsylvania: A German's Warning (1750).
29: Letter from a Swiss Settler in Pennsylvania (1769).
30: Regulating Morals and Education.
31: Massachusetts Blue Laws (1632–1638).
32: Massachusetts School Law (1647).
33: The Duke's Laws in New York (1664).
34: Social Improvement.
35: The Junto Queries (1729).
36: Marriage.
37: Anne Bradstreet, “To My Dear and Loving Husband” (1678).
38: On the Necessity of Marriage (1699).
39: Advice on Marrying Within One's Class (1707).
40: On the Necessity of Love in Marriage (1712).
41: Advertising a Wife Running Away and a Wife Living in Adultery (1762 and 1774).
42: Negotiating a Marriage in Virginia (1764).
43: A Love Letter from a Virginia Planter to His Wife (1776).
44: Raising Children.
45: A Parent Worrying about the Future Usefulness and Happiness of His Son (1695).
46: A Plea for Mercy in the Case of a Mother Concealing Her Newborn's Death (1714).
47: Resolutions from a Mother to Herself and Family in South Carolina (1750s).
48: Instructions on Good Manners for Children (1773).
49: Disease.
50: Arguments over a Smallpox Vaccine (1722).
51: A Smallpox Outbreak in New York City (1731).
52: Economic Life and Material Life.
53: Economic Life.
54: Tobacco Plantations.
55: The First Profits from Tobacco (1619).
56: A Virginia Tobacco Plantation's Worth (1686).
57: New England and Pennsylvania Prosperity.
58: On the Rapid Increase in Massachusetts Bay Colony (1660).
59: William Penn, Some Account of the Province of Pennsilvania in America (1681).
60: A Description of Philadelphia (1759).
61: Regulating the Market.
62: On the Just Price: A Warning Against Acquisitiveness (1639).
63: John Winthrop on Regulating Wages in Massachusetts Bay Colony (1640).
64: The Problem and Politics of an Inflated Currency (1748).
65: Women and Property.
66: The Wife as a Feme Sole Trader in South Carolina (1744).
67: A Husband and Wife Share a Business in Virginia (1752).
68: Labor.
69: Disciplining Sailors (1722).
70: Workers' Monopolies in New York (1753).
71: Advertising for Apprentices (1772).
72: The African Slave Trade as Colonial Enterprise (1788).
73: Population Increase and Wealth.
74: Benjamin Franklin, Increase of Mankind (1751).
75: The Classes of Society in New York (1765).
76: Gaining “Independency”.
77: William Byrd and the Plantation Ideal of “Independency” (1726).
78: Benjamin Franklin, “The Way to Wealth” (1758).
79: Material Life.
80: Sumptuary Laws.
81: Sumptuary Laws in Massachusetts Bay Colony (1634).
82: House Furnishings, Furniture, Paintings, Clothes, and Sundry Possessions.
83: Inventory of the Main Room in a Puritan Governor's House (1657).
84: A Wedding Outfit in Massachusetts (1720).
85: Portraits of the Gentleman (1753).
86: Making Household Items, Philadelphia and Germantown (1759).
87: Benjamin Franklin on Buying Household Items (1760s).
88: Inventory of a Town House and a Country House (1776).
89: Clothing of Servants and Slaves.
90: Runaway Slaves and Indentured Servants (1757).
91: Intellectual Life.
92: Puritan Writings.
93: Anne Bradstreet, “A Dialogue between Old England and New” (1630).
94: Cotton Mather, The Wonders of the Invisible World (1693).
95: Education.
96: The Reasons for Establishing Harvard College (1643).
97: Benjamin Franklin, Proposal for Promoting Useful Knowledge (1743).
98: Benjamin Franklin, Proposals Relating to the Education of Youth (1749).
99: John Trumbull, “The Progress of Dulness” (1772–1773).
100: Medicine.
101: Some Observations on the New Method of Receiving the Small Pox by Ingrafting or Inoculating (1721).
102: Science.
103: “An Essay upon the Natural History of Whales” (1724).
104: Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard's Almanack and Useful Knowledge (1736).
105: Benjamin Franklin, Kite Experiment Instructions (1752).
106: Nathaniel Ames, An Astronomical Diary … [for] 1758 (1757).
107: John Bartram, “Travels on the St. Johns River” (1765–1766).
108: Political Life.
109: Charters, Covenants, and Constitutions.
110: Ordinance of 1621 Establishing Representative Government in Virginia.
111: The Mayflower Compact (1620).
112: Dedham, Massachusetts, Town Covenant (1636).
113: “Concessions and Agreements of the Proprietors of New Jersey” (1665).
114: Pennsylvania Charter of Privileges and Liberties (1701).
115: The Glorious Revolution, Thoughts on Monarchy, and the Rights of the Assembly.
116: A Memorial on Leisler's Rebellion in New York (1689).
117: An Essay on Monarchy and Liberty (1752).
118: “Message of the Pennsylvania Assembly” to the Governor on the Rights of the Assembly (1755).
119: Popular Uprisings in the Southern and Northern Colonies.
120: Nathaniel Bacon and the Declaration in the Name of the People (1676).
121: A Declaration against the Proceedings of Nathaniel Bacon (1676).
122: Letter on an Anti-Impressment Riot in Boston (1747).
123: Benjamin Franklin, “Narrative of the Late Massacres, in Lancaster County” (1764).
124: A Regulator's Letter to the Inhabitants of North Carolina (1769).
125: Freedom of the Press.
126: The Trial of John Peter Zenger for Libel (1735).
127: The Aftermath of the French and Indian War.
128: A Sermon on the Blessing of Being British after the French and Indian War (1763).
129: Pontiac's Reasons for Making War against the English (1763).
130: Colonial Protests against British Authority.
131: John Dickinson, Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, Letter II (1768).
132: Anonymous Account of the Boston Massacre (1770).
133: Samuel Adams, The Rights of the Colonists (1772).
134: New York Sons of Liberty Tea Resolutions (1773).
135: An Account of the Boston Tea Party (1773).
136: Fighting for Freedom.
137: Minuteman Agreement (1775).
138: Resolutions of the Provincial Congress of Virginia, March 23, 1775.
139: Lord Dunmore's Proclamation (1776).
140: “Petition of a Great Number of Negroes” for Freedom (1777).
141: Recreational Life.
142: Feasts and Gatherings.
143: The First Thanksgiving (1621).
144: Servants' Feasting at Master's Expense (1664).
145: Cornhusking (1760s).
146: Public Exhibitions.
147: A Public Execution of Pirates (1704).
148: Exhibition of Animals (1741).
149: Urban “Sports”.
150: Sleigh Rides in New York City (1704).
151: Hauling the Fox in Boston (1744).
152: Dancing and Drinking.
153: Dancing and Racial Mixing in the Taverns (1740).
154: Young People Drinking and Dancing (1741).
155: Revivals and Rituals.
156: The Bonfires of Religious Enthusiasm (1741).
157: Guy Fawkes' or Pope's, Day in Boston (1774).
158: Militia Days (1775).
159: Southern Recreation.
160: Visiting and Hospitality in Virginia (1686).
161: Hunting, Fishing, Fowling, and Other Recreation in Plantation Virginia (1705).
162: A Planter's Pastimes (1720).
163: Entertaining a Traveler in New York (1744).
164: A Planter's Ball in Virginia (1774).
165: “A Negro Ball” in Virginia (1774).
166: Rural Amusements (1787).
167: Club Life.
168: Clubs for Men in Towns and Cities (1729).
169: Benjamin Franklin, “The Morals of Chess” (1750).
170: Political Meetings (1768).
171: Religious Life.
172: The Puritan Errand into the Wilderness.
173: John Winthrop, “A Modell of Christian Charity” (1630).
174: The Trial of Anne Hutchinson (1637).
175: Religious Toleration.
176: Roger Williams, The Bloudy Tenent of Persecution (1644).
177: The Maryland Toleration Act (1649).
178: An Act Regulating Quakers in Massachusetts Bay Colony (1677).
179: Witchcraft Trials (1665 and 1692).
180: Captivity and Redemption.
181: Mary Rowlandson, Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration (1682).
182: Revivals and Conversions.
183: Benjamin Franklin on George Whitefield's Preaching (1739).
184: An Account of the Great Awakening in Connecticut (1740).
185: Narrative of a Former Slave Girl on Her Conversion (1770s).
186: Regulating Clergy.
187: Advice to Ministers to Avoid Scandal (1674).
188: Evicting a Parson in Virginia (1747).
189: The Dangers of Empty Pulpits (1771).
190: Social Functions of a Church.
191: Philip Vickers Fithian, A Sunday at Church in Virginia (1774).
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Contents.
Set Introduction.
Acknowledgments.
Chronology of Selected Events, 1791–1865.
1: Historical Overview.
2: Revolution and a New Nation.
3: A New Government and an Expanding Nation.
4: The War of 1812 to the Age of Jackson.
5: The Road to Civil War.
6: Domestic Life.
7: Women's Roles.
8: Emma Willard, The Risks of Marrying (1815).
9: Woman as Farmer and Businessman (1828).
10: Roles of Female Slaves (1855–1865).
11: Children.
12: Frederick Douglass on the Life of a Slave Child (1820s).
13: Childhood and Breaking the Bonds of Home (1853).
14: The Childhood of a Slave (1850s).
15: Old Age.
16: George Washington to the Marquis de Lafayette (1784).
17: Sports of Childhood (1832).
18: Nathan Parker Willis on Aging Gracefully (1849).
19: Economic Life.
20: Urban Life.
21: A Description of Philadelphia (1814).
22: Harriet Martineau on Washington, D.C., in the 1830s.
23: The City of Savannah (1840s).
24: Rural Life.
25: Travels in New York State (1790).
26: Nathaniel Hawthorne on Hard Farm Work (1841).
27: Frederick Law Olmsted on Rural Life in South Carolina (1850s).
28: Immigration.
29: A Protest against Prejudice (1852).
30: An Uncertain Future: Immigrants Arriving in New York City (1853).
31: A Letter Home (1855).
32: Trade.
33: Canals for a Growing Nation (1828).
34: Charles Francis Adams on Financing Internal Improvements (1840).
35: Funding the Railroads (1851).
36: Intellectual Life.
37: Education.
38: Thomas Jefferson on the Advantages of an American Education (1785).
39: Sir Charles Lyell Describes a Boston School (1845).
40: A Frenchman's Views of the American School System (1853).
41: Science: Exploration.
42: Meriwether Lewis, The Lewis and Clark Expedition (1804).
43: Zebulon Pike on the Dangers of the Early West (1806).
44: John C. Frémont on the Discoveries of the West (1843).
45: Health and Medicine.
46: Matthew Carey on the Scourge of Yellow Fever (1794).
47: Benjamin Rush on the Effects of Alcoholism (1805).
48: Dorothea Dix, A Call to Help the Mentally Ill (1843).
49: Language and Literature.
50: Alexis de Tocqueville on Literary Characteristics of Democratic Ages (1841).
51: Edgar Allan Poe, “The Raven” (1845).
52: Harriet Beecher Stowe, Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852).
53: Henry David Thoreau, Walden (1854).
54: Material Life.
55: Food and Drink.
56: Cranberry Tarts (1670s).
57: Fried Chicken (1828).
58: Emily Dickinson's Recipe for Rice Cakes (1851).
59: Cookery (1864).
60: Houses and Furniture.
61: Francis J. Grund on American Homes (1837).
62: A Southern Planter's House (1840s).
63: Fredrika Bremer on an American Home (1849).
64: Frederick Law Olmsted on a Yeoman Farmer's Home in the South (1861).
65: Clothing and Personal Appearance.
66: Abigail Adams on Court Dress (1796); The Uniforms of the Massachusetts Militia (1781): Officers and Gentlewomen in the Eighteenth Century.
67: A Difficult Pair of Boots (1832).
68: Bridal Dresses (1860).
69: Technology.
70: Robert Fulton on the First Voyage of His Steamboat (1807).
71: The Race between a Steam Engine and a Horse (1830).
72: Travel from New York to Philadelphia (1838).
73: Assembling the Musket (1852).
74: Political Life.
75: Social Hierarchy.
76: Cruelty to Slaves on a Mississippi Plantation (1824).
77: Catharine Beecher's A Treatise on Domestic Economy (1841).
78: Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Address to the Legislature of New York, Adopted by the State Women's Rights Convention at Albany (February 1854).
79: Government.
80: James Madison, “The Utility of the Union as a Safeguard against Domestic Faction and Insurrection” (1787).
81: John C. Calhoun, “The Concurrent Majority” (1845).
82: The Lincoln–Douglas Debates (1858).
83: Justice and Legal Systems.
84: The Manumission Laws in Various States (1788).
85: A Day in Divorce Court (1838).
86: Alexis de Tocqueville on Judicial Power in the United States (1847).
87: Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857).
88: Warfare.
89: I Hope I Didn't Kill Him (1778).
90: Andrew Jackson on the Battle of New Orleans (1815).
91: Ulysses S. Grant on the Battle of Monterrey (1846).
92: Slavery.
93: Nat Turner, The Confessions of Nat Turner (1831).
94: Frederick Douglass on the Cruelty of Slaveholders and the Suffering of Slaves (1845).
95: The Slave Life of Josiah Henson (1849).
96: Solomon Northup, Twelve Years a Slave (1853).
97: Native Americans.
98: Black Hawk's Surrender Speech (1832).
99: Andrew Jackson's “Permanent Habitation for the American Indians” Speech (1835).
100: Response of Speckled Snake (Cherokee) to Andrew Jackson's Removal Policy (1841).
101: Recreational Life.
102: Games and Sports.
103: Hunting in Virginia (1799).
104: A Pool Hall in Cincinnati (1828).
105: Baseball vs. Cricket (1859).
106: Line Fishing (Early 1860s).
107: Travel.
108: Travel during the Revolution (1776).
109: A Steamboat Ride on the Mississippi (1850s).
110: Randolph Marcy, The Prairie Traveler (1859).
111: Music and Dance.
112: “Yankee Doodle” (1778).
113: “Star Spangled Banner” (1814).
114: “Dixie's Land” (1860).
115: Religious Life.
116: Religions in Contact.
117: Thomas Paine, “The Monk and the Jew” (1775).
118: Tenkswataya, Speech on a System of Religion (1808).
119: Alexis de Tocqueville on the Progress of Roman Catholicism in the United States (1847).
120: Support for Churches in America (1854).
121: Forms of Worship.
122: A View of a Shaker Meeting (1790s).
123: A Camp Meeting Heats Up (1829).
124: The Washing of the Feet on Holy Thursday in St. Peter's (1858).
125: Systems of Belief.
126: Beliefs of the Quakers (1788).
127: Sabbatical Observances in England and America (1838).
128: The Difference between Church Services in England and America (1857).
129: Death and Afterlife.
130: A Dream of Heaven (1842).
131: Sir Charles Lyell on a More Forgiving God (1840s).
132: On the Death of an Infant to a Mother, by the Authoress of The Discipline of Life (1850).
Suggested Readings.
About the Editor.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Contents.
Set Introduction.
Chronology of Selected Events, 1866–1918.
1: Historical Overview.
2: The Civil War and Reconstruction.
3: The Second Industrial Revolution.
4: The Progressive Era.
5: Sources Cited.
6: Domestic Life.
7: Women.
8: A Young Woman Witnesses the Fall of the South (1864–1865).
9: Susan B. Anthony Is Wrong to Assert That the Fourteenth Amendment Was Meant to Include Women (1873).
10: Alexander Graham Bell on Women's Rights (1875).
11: A Young Southern Woman Recalls Reconstruction (1900).
12: Jane Addams on Suffrage (1909).
13: Children.
14: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861).
15: A Young Boy Remembers the Civil War (1860–1865).
16: A Young Girl Remembers Growing Up on a Sheep Farm in California (1870s).
17: An Orphanage Director's Philosophy of Raising Children (1879).
18: The Best Diet for Children (1894).
19: Old Age.
20: An Elderly Woman Needs a Home (1900).
21: Elderly Men's Difficulties Finding Work (1904).
22: Mark Twain on Old Age: An Interview with a Newspaperman (1905).
23: W. E. B. Du Bois on How the Black Community Care for Their Elderly (1913).
24: Economic Life.
25: Urban Life.
26: “General Effects of the Shake”: An Earthquake in San Francisco (1865).
27: “Improved Tenement Houses in New York” (1879).
28: Jacob Riis Describes Life among the Urban Poor (1890).
29: Lincoln Steffens on Political Corruption in Philadelphia (1904).
30: City Bosses (1905).
31: Working Conditions in Urban Factories (1911).
32: Life of the Newly Emerging Class of Urban Blacks (1911).
33: Rural Life.
34: Sharecropper Contract (1882).
35: Latino Life in Rural California (1885).
36: Trade and Migration.
37: Frederick Jackson Turner on the Significance of the Frontier in American History (1893).
38: Chinese Immigrants at the Turn of the Century (1906).
39: Life of an Immigrant Meatpacker in Chicago (1906).
40: Samuel Bryan, “Mexican Americans and Southwestern Growth” (1912).
41: Mother Jones Demands Protection for Coal Miners and Their Families (1912).
42: Intellectual Life.
43: Education.
44: The Founding and Early History of Hampton School (1870).
45: Hiram Revels Advocates Integrated Schools (1871).
46: Charles Francis Adams on the Purpose of Higher Education (1891).
47: Science.
48: Alexander Graham Bell on Telegraphs without Wire (1893).
49: Wilbur Wright's Early Plan for Flight (1900).
50: Health and Medicine.
51: Dr. Johnson's Blood-Purifying Compound Infusion (1880s).
52: Rules for Walking (1887).
53: Clara Barton Provides a Glimpse of Medical Understanding in the Mid-Nineteenth Century (1907).
54: W. E. B. Du Bois on the Health and Sexual Practices of African Americans (1913).
55: Dr. John Harvey Kellogg Prescribes a Bran Diet for Good Health (1915).
56: Language and Literature.
57: Anthony Comstock Condemns Street Literature for Influencing Young People (1883).
58: Stephen Crane, Maggie, Girl of the Streets (1896).
59: Rudyard Kipling, “The White Man's Burden” (1899).
60: Stephen Crane, Antiwar Poem Written after the Spanish-American War (1899).
61: Art and Architecture.
62: Henry Adams, Reflections on the Chicago World's Fair (1893).
63: Pathetic Ignorance of the Arts (1894).
64: Louis Sullivan, “The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered” (1896).
65: The Arts and Crafts Movement (1902).
66: Material Life.
67: Food and Drink.
68: Washington Pie Recipe (1867).
69: Upton Sinclair Makes People Think Twice about Eating Meat (1906).
70: Houses and Furniture.
71: Modern Home No. 102 (Sears Roebuck) (1908).
72: “A Twentieth Century Living Room” (1911).
73: Clothing and Personal Appearance.
74: “What Well Dressed Women Are Wearing” (1910).
75: Desirable Clothes for Stout and Elderly Women (1912).
76: Technology.
77: Thomas Edison on the Phonograph (1878).
78: The Brooklyn Bridge (1883).
79: Dangers of the Automobile (1904).
80: Railroad to the Sea (1905).
81: The Wright Brothers Demonstrate Their Machine Publicly (1908).
82: Political Life.
83: Social Hierarchy.
84: Address of the Freedmen's Convention to the White and Colored Citizens of North Carolina (1866).
85: A Black Man and a White Man Exchange Views on Reconstruction in Alabama (1867).
86: Helen Hunt Jackson Describes Abuse of Native Americans (1881).
87: President Hayes Contemplates Solutions to the Growing Inequality in America (1886).
88: Teddy Roosevelt Urges the Americanization of Immigrants (1894).
89: Government.
90: The Gettysburg Address (1863).
91: Interstate Commerce Act (1887).
92: Progressive Party Platform (1912).
93: Justice and Legal Systems.
94: Black Codes of Mississippi (1865).
95: John Marshall Harlan, Dissent in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896).
96: Ida Wells-Barnett's Fight against Lynching (1899).
97: Eugene Debs Addresses the Court on Freedom of Speech (1918).
98: Warfare.
99: First Days of the Civil War in and around Washington (1861).
100: General Benjamin Butler Declares That the Women of New Orleans Who Insult His Officers Shall Be Arrested as Prostitutes (1862).
101: Generals U. S. Grant and G. T. Beauregard on Burying the Dead after the Battle of Shiloh (1862).
102: Life on the Southern Home Front during the War (1861–1865).
103: Brutal Attack by Soldiers on Indian Families at Sand Creek (1864).
104: African Methodist Episcopal Church, “The Negro Should Not Enter the Army” (1899).
105: Geronimo: His Own Story (1906).
106: Woodrow Wilson, First Lusitania Note to Germany (1915).
107: Recreational Life.
108: Games and Sports.
109: James Corbett on the Sullivan-Corbett Fight (1892).
110: Calamity Jane Remembers (1896).
111: Spalding's Official Baseball Guide (1910).
112: H. G. Wells on the Toys to Have (1911).
113: Travel.
114: Alaska (1892).
115: John Muir, Our National Parks (1901).
116: Opening of the World's Fair at St. Louis (1904).
117: The Thrills of Coney Island Turned Inside Out (1908).
118: Music and Dance.
119: Celebrating Christmas in the Confederacy (1896).
120: W. E. B. Du Bois on Amusement for Young African Americans (1913).
121: Dry Island All Star Vaudeville and Burlesque (1913).
122: The Art of Social Dancing (1914).
123: Religious Life.
124: Religions in Contact.
125: Eulalia Pérez, “Life on a California Mission” (1877).
126: Archbishop John Hughes, Appeal to the Antidraft Rioters (1863).
127: First African American Church in Weldon, North Carolina (1887).
128: Catholic Celebration (1908).
129: Forms of Worship.
130: Celebrating Passover during the Civil War (1866).
131: Sermons from the South (1887).
132: Camp Meeting Attracts 50,000 (1902).
133: Native American Corn Dance (1915).
134: Belief Systems.
135: Roman Catholics in America (1901).
136: Presbyterians Raise the Race Question (1906).
137: Salvation Army Christmas Feast Cheers 25,000 (1905).
138: Death and Afterlife.
139: Funeral of General U. S. Grant (1885).
140: José Martí Describes a Chinese Funeral (1888).
141: A Ghostly Funeral Procession (1890).
Suggested Readings.
About the Authors.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Contents.
Set Introduction.
Acknowledgments.
Chronology of Selected Events, 1919–2011.
1: Historical Overview.
2: Introduction: Some Thoughts on Primary Documents.
3: 1914–1920: World War I (the “Great War”).
4: 1920–1932: The “Roaring Twenties” and the Great Depression.
5: 1933–1940: Franklin Roosevelt's “New Deal”.
6: 1940–1945: The Second World War.
7: 1945–1959: Postwar America and the Consumer Culture.
8: 1960–1990: The Era of Protest and Change.
9: 1990–2010: The Contemporary Era.
10: Domestic Life.
11: Carrie Chapman Catt, “Do You Know?” (1915).
12: Advertisement Warning Americans about the Flu Pandemic (1918).
13: The Eighteenth Amendment: Prohibition (1920).
14: The Nineteenth Amendment: Suffrage (1920).
15: Margaret Sanger, Woman and the New Race (1920).
16: San Francisco News, “Evacuation to Be Carried Out Gradually” (1942).
17: Brown v. Board of Education: School Desegregation Ruling (1954).
18: Mario Savio, “Free Speech” Statement at Berkeley (1964).
19: An American Serviceman's Letters from Vietnam (1969).
20: Roe v. Wade: Abortion Rights Ruling (1973).
21: Gloria Steinem, Speech at Salem State College (1993).
22: Gays in the U.S. Military: “Don't Ask, Don't Tell” Policy (1993–1994).
23: Economic Life.
24: Frederick W. Taylor's Scientific Management Concepts (1914).
25: Railway Administration Act (1918).
26: Henry Ford, My Life and Work (1922).
27: National Labor Relations Act (Wagner Act) (1935).
28: President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Radio Address on the Works Progress Administration (1935).
29: President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Fireside Chat Concerning the “Coal Crisis” (1943).
30: Taft-Hartley Act (Labor-Management Relations Act) (1947).
31: President Dwight D. Eisenhower, Military-Industrial Complex Speech (1961).
32: Equal Pay Act (1963).
33: North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Treaty (1994).
34: Intellectual Life.
35: Robert Frost, “The Road Not Taken” (1915).
36: Carl Sandburg, “Chicago” (1916).
37: George M. Cohan, “Over There” (1917).
38: Florence Earle Coates, Pro Patria (1917).
39: Mexican American Folk/Protest Ballad (1924).
40: Walter Lippmann, Editorial on the Sacco-Vanzetti Trial (1927).
41: Hallie Flanagan on the Federal Theatre Project (1935).
42: Albert Einstein, Letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt (1939).
43: William Faulkner, Nobel Prize Speech (1950).
44: Allen Ginsberg Interview about the Counterculture, 1950s–1970s.
45: James Baldwin, “My Dungeon Shook”: A Letter to My Nephew on the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation (1962).
46: Toni Morrison, Nobel Prize Speech (1993).
47: Material Life.
48: Charles Teague on the Need for Mexican Labor (1928).
49: Advertisement for a Car (1928).
50: A. Philip Randolph, Address to the March on Washington Movement (1942).
51: Newton Minow, “Great Wasteland” Speech (1961).
52: César Chávez and the National Farm Workers (1963).
53: President Lyndon B. Johnson, “Special Message to Congress: The American Promise” (1965).
54: Indians of All Tribes, Alcatraz Proclamation (1969).
55: Jesse Jackson, Speech on Economic Disparity for African Americans (1998).
56: Bill Cosby, “Pound Cake” Speech (2004).
57: Bill Gates on the “Eleven Rules of Life” (2008).
58: Political Life.
59: President Woodrow Wilson, The Fourteen Points (1918).
60: President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Address to the Nation after the Attack on Pearl Harbor (1941).
61: General Dwight D. Eisenhower, Order of the Day (1944).
62: George C. Marshall, The “Marshall Plan” (1947).
63: Senator Margaret Chase Smith, “Declaration of Conscience” (1950).
64: President John F. Kennedy, Inaugural Address (1961).
65: Escobedo v. Illinois: Criminal Rights Ruling (1964).
66: Civil Rights Act (1964).
67: Voting Rights Act (1965).
68: President Richard Nixon, Resignation Speech (1974).
69: President Ronald Reagan, Remarks at the Brandenburg Gate (1987).
70: President George W. Bush, 9/11 Address to the Nation (2001).
71: President Barack Obama, Cairo Speech (2009).
72: Recreational Life.
73: The Rules for Mahjongg (1920s).
74: Charles Lindbergh, Letter to Juan Trippe (1933).
75: Hays's Movie Code (1934).
76: Women's Baseball League, “A League of Their Own Rules” (1943).
77: Race, Baseball, and Jackie Robinson (1947).
78: Title IX, The Education Legislation (1972).
79: Current Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) Movie Ratings (1990).
80: Halle Berry, Academy Award Acceptance Speech (2002).
81: Deborah McLaren, Ecology Meets Tourism (2003).
82: Henry Waxman (D-NY), Opening Statement at Congressional Hearings on the Use of Steroids in Major League Baseball (2008).
83: President Barack Obama, Speech at the Gridiron Club Dinner (2011).
84: Religious Life.
85: Scopes Trial: Clarence Darrow's Questioning of William Jennings Bryan (1925).
86: Father Charles E. Coughlin, “Religious Politics” in the Depression Era (1936).
87: Engel v. Vitale: Public School Prayer (1962).
88: Madalyn O'Hair, “The Battle Is Joined” (1963).
89: Elijah Muhammad, “What the Muslims Want” Speech (1972).
90: Ted Hoare, Introduction to the Society of Friends (1999).
91: Pope John Paul II, Speech to Twelve U.S. Cardinals on the Sex Abuse Scandal (2002).
92: Anonymous Message Sent to Douglas County, Georgia, High School on School Prayer (2002).
93: Anti-Defamation League, Statement on Proposed Islamic Community Center Near “Ground Zero” (2010).
94: Congressman Peter King, Congressional Hearings on American Muslim Radicalization (2011).
Suggested Readings.
Index.
About the Editor.