eBook Make It Here: Inciting Creativity and Innovation in Your Library, 1st Edition

  • ISBN-10: 1610695550
  • ISBN-13: 9781610695558
  • DDC: 027
  • 136 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2015 | Published/Released March 2015
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2015
  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Libraries of all sizes and resource levels are finding ways to support community innovation and creativity through maker programming-and successful programs don’t require dedicating an entire area of the library to makerspace activities or sophisticated technologies such as 3D printers. Make It Here: Inciting Creativity and Innovation in Your Library provides a complete, step-by-step guide for starting a makerspace program at your library and follows through with instructions for operation and building on your success. This book takes you step-by-step through starting your maker program-from finding the right "makerspace mix," making a plan, and working with staff to establishing funding and support, launching your makerspace, and evaluating and refining your programs. The authors provide guidance based on their personal experiences in creating and developing maker programs in their libraries as well as feedback and lessons learned from library makers across the country. You’ll see how easy it can be to bring their ideas to life in ways that will empower your community, and be encouraged to be bold and think outside of the box when imagining the possibilities.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Preface.
Acknowledgments.
1: Why Should We Encourage Creativity in the Library?.
2: Makerspace Profile–Thinklab at University of Mary Washington.
3: Makerspace Profile–Mountain View Public Library.
4: Meet the Makerspace.
5: Makerspace Profile–Allen County Public Library.
6: Makerspace Profile–Georgetown Branch, Allen County Public Library.
7: Finding the Right Makerspace Mix.
8: Makerspace Profile–Johnson County, Kansas, Public Libraries.
9: Makerspace Profile–North Carolina State University Libraries.
10: Working with Staff.
11: Staff Profile–Janet Hollingsworth of Anythink Brighton Library.
12: Makerspace Profile–Jefferson County, Colorado, Libraries.
13: Making a Plan.
14: Makerspace Profile–Missoula, Montana, Public Library.
15: Makerspace Profile–Mach1, Burton Barr Public Library in Pheonix, Arizona.
16: Bits vs. Atoms: Media Labs and Makerspaces.
17: Makerspace Profile–Skokie Public Library Digital Media Lab.
18: Funding and Support.
19: Makerspace Profile–Denver Public Library.
20: Makerspace Profile–Grand Valley State University.
21: Launching Your Makerspace.
22: Makerspace Profile–The Bubbler Madison, Wisconsin, Public Library.
23: Operations.
24: Makerspace Profile–The Free Library of Philadelphia.
25: Makerspace Profile–Hype Teen Center, Detroit Public Library.
26: Programming.
27: Online Resource—Make It @ Your Library.
28: Building on Your Success.
29: Makerspace Profile–Witherle Memorial Library in Castine, Maine.
30: Makerspace Profile–The Fayetteville Free Library Fab Lab.
Resources.
Appendix A: Original Anythink Brighton Makerspace Grant Proposal.
Appendix B: Anythink Digital Learning Lab Grant Proposal.
Bibliography.
About the Authors.