eBook Princeton Encyclopedia Of Islamic Political Thought, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 140083855X
  • ISBN-13: 9781400838554
  • DDC: 320.55
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 656 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2012 | Published/Released January 2013
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2012
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About

Overview

The first encyclopedia of Islamic political thought from the birth of Islam to today, this comprehensive, authoritative, and accessible reference provides the context needed for understanding contemporary politics in the Islamic world and beyond. With more than 400 alphabetically arranged entries written by an international team of specialists, the volume focuses on the origins and evolution of Islamic political ideas and related subjects, covering central terms, concepts, personalities, movements, places, and schools of thought across Islamic history. Fifteen major entries provide a synthetic treatment of key topics, such as Muhammad, jihad, authority, gender, culture, minorities, fundamentalism, and pluralism. Incorporating the latest scholarship, this is an indispensable resource for students, researchers, journalists, and anyone else seeking an informed perspective on the complex intersection of Islam and politics. Includes more than 400 concise, alphabetically arranged entries. Features 15 in-depth entries on key topics -- Covers topics such as: Central themes and sources of Islamic political thought: caliph, modernity, knowledge, shari’a, government, revival and reform. Modern concepts, institutions, movements, and parties: civil society, Islamization, secularism, veil, Muslim Brotherhood, Islamic law and traditional Islamic societies: justice, taxation, fatwa, dissent, governance, piety and asceticism, trade and commerce; Sects, schools, regions, and dynasties: Mu’tazilis, Shi’ism, Quraysh, Mecca and Medina, Baghdad, Indonesia, Nigeria, Central Asia, Ottomans -- Thinkers, personalities, and statesmen: Mawardi, Shafi’I, Saladin, Tamerlane, Akbar, Atatürk, Nasser, Khomeini

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Introduction.
Alphabetical List of Entries.
Topical List of Entries.
Contributors.
Maps.
1: ‘Abbas I (1571–1629).
2: Abbasids (750–1258).
3: ‘Abd al-Hamid al-Katib, b. Yahya al-‘Amiri (d. 750).
4: ‘Abd al-Qadir al-Jaza’iri (1808–83).
5: ‘Abd al-Rahman, ‘Umar (b. 1938).
6: ‘Abd al-Raziq, ‘Ali (1887–1966).
7: Abdication.
8: ‘Abduh, Muhammad (1849–1905).
9: Abdülhamid II (1842–1918).
10: Abodes of Islam, War, and Truce.
11: Absolutism.
12: Abu Bakr (ca. 573–634).
13: Abu Hanifa (699–767).
14: Abu Yusuf (ca. 731–98).
15: Advice.
16: al-Afghani, Jamal al-Din (1838–97).
17: Afghanistan.
18: ‘Aflaq, Michel (1910–89).
19: Aga Khan.
20: Ahmad, Israr (1932–2010).
21: Ahmad b. Hanbal (780–855).
22: Ahmadis.
23: Ahmad Sirhindi (1564–1624).
24: ‘A’isha (ca. 614–78).
25: Akbar the Great (1542–1605).
26: ‘Alawis.
27: Algeria.
28: ‘Ali b. Abi Talib (ca. 599–661).
29: Aligarh.
30: Alliances.
31: Almohads (1130–1269).
32: Almoravids (1056–1147).
33: Amal.
34: Anarchism.
35: Apartheid.
36: Apocalypse.
37: Apostasy.
38: Arab Nationalism.
39: Arafat, Yasir (1929–2004).
40: Arbitration.
41: Ash‘aris.
42: ‘Ashura’.
43: Astrology.
44: Asylum.
45: Atatürk, Mustafa Kemal (1881–1938).
46: Aurangzeb (1618–1707).
47: Authority.
48: Ayatollah.
49: Ayyubids (1169–1250).
50: Azhar University.
51: Babur, Zahir al-Din (1483–1530).
52: Baghdad.
53: Bangladesh.
54: al-Banna, Hasan (1906–49).
55: Barelwis.
56: Ba‘th Party.
57: Bazaar.
58: Beirut.
59: Berbers.
60: Bin Laden, Osama (1957–2011).
61: Blasphemy.
62: Brethren of Purity.
63: Brotherhoods.
64: Bureaucracy.
65: Buyids (945–1062).
66: Cairo.
67: Caliph, Caliphate.
68: Capitalism.
69: Censorship.
70: Central Asia.
71: Charity.
72: China.
73: Chivalry.
74: Christian-Muslim Relations.
75: Citizenship.
76: City.
77: City (Philosophical).
78: Civil Society.
79: Civil War.
80: Clients.
81: Coinage.
82: Collective Obligations.
83: Colonialism.
84: Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong.
85: Communism.
86: Community.
87: Companions of the Prophet.
88: Consensus.
89: Constitutionalism.
90: Constitution of Medina.
91: Consultation.
92: Contracts.
93: Conversion.
94: Coup d’état.
95: Crusades.
96: Culture.
97: Custom.
98: Dan Fodio, Usman (1754–1817).
99: Dawani, Jalal al-Din (1427–1502).
100: Delhi.
101: Delhi Sultanate (1206–1526).
102: Democracy.
103: Demographics.
104: Deobandis.
105: Difference of Opinion.
106: Diplomacy.
107: Dissent, Opposition, Resistance.
108: Dissimulation.
109: Division of Labor.
110: Druze.
111: East Africa.
112: Economic Theory.
113: Education.
114: Egypt.
115: Elections.
116: Endowment.
117: Environment.
118: Equality.
119: Ethics.
120: Ethiopia and Eritrea.
121: Ethnicity.
122: Europe.
123: Excommunication.
124: Exegesis.
125: Fadlallah, Muhammad Husayn (1935–2010).
126: Faith.
127: Family.
128: al-Farabi, Abu Nasr (ca. 878–950).
129: Faraj, Muhammad ‘Abd al-Salam (1954–82).
130: Fatimids (909–1171).
131: Fatwa.
132: Freedom.
133: Free Will.
134: Friday Prayer.
135: Friendship.
136: Fundamentalism.
137: al-Gama‘a al-Islamiyya.
138: Genealogy.
139: Ghazali (ca. 1058–1111).
140: Ghāzī.
141: Ghaznavids (977–1086).
142: Ghurids (1009–1215).
143: Globalization.
144: God.
145: Governance.
146: Government.
147: Grievance.
148: Guardianship of the Jurist.
149: Guilds.
150: Hadith.
151: Hakim bi-Amr Allah (985–1021).
152: Hamas.
153: Hasan b. ‘Ali (ca. 624–70).
154: Heresiography.
155: Heresy and Innovation.
156: Hijra.
157: Hizbullah.
158: Holy Places.
159: Honor.
160: Household.
161: Human Nature.
162: Human Rights.
163: Husayn b. ‘Ali (626–80).
164: Hypocrisy.
165: Ibadis.
166: Ibn ‘Abd al-Wahhab, Muhammad (1703–92).
167: Ibn al-Muqaffa‘ (ca. 720–56).
168: Ibn Bajja (d. 1139).
169: Ibn Hazm (994–1064).
170: Ibn Jama‘a (1241–1333).
171: Ibn Khaldun (1332–1406).
172: Ibn Rushd (1126–98).
173: Ibn Sina, Abu ‘Ali (980–1037).
174: Ibn Taymiyya (1263–1328).
175: Ibn Tufayl (ca. 1105–85).
176: Ibn Tumart (ca. 1080–1130).
177: Ideology.
178: Ijtihād and Taqlīd.
179: Ilkhanids (1256–1336).
180: Imamate.
181: Imperialism.
182: India.
183: Individualism.
184: Indonesia.
185: Inquisition.
186: Intercession.
187: International Islamic Organizations.
188: International Relations.
189: Iqbal, Muhammad (1877–1938).
190: Iran.