eBook American Immigration: An Encyclopedia of Political, Social, and Cultural Change, 2nd Edition

  • James Ciment
  • John Radzilowski
  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 0765682133
  • ISBN-13: 9780765682130
  • DDC: 304.873003
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 1272 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2013 | Published/Released August 2014
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2013
  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Thoroughly revised and updated, this groundbreaking reference is the definitive source on American immigration from both historical and contemporary perspectives. With more than 170 in-depth articles, it traces the scope and sweep of U.S. immigration from the earliest settlement to the present day, taking a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach. Every major immigrant group and every era in U.S. history are carefully examined through detailed analysis of social, legal, political, economic, and demographic factors. Hot-topic current issues and controversies—from amnesty to U.S. border security—are covered in depth. Archival and contemporary photographs, maps, and illustrations complement the core text. Also featured are scores of tables, charts, and graphs providing valuable statistics and comparative data. A special added value of the new edition is the inclusion of more than 80 full-text primary documents from 1775 to 2013, including laws and treaties, Supreme Court decisions, state referenda, government reports, speeches, and letters.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
American Immigration: Table of Contents.
Introduction: Immigrants, Immigration, and the American Identity.
A-Z Entries.
1: Admission Laws: Pre-Restriction Era (1800s–1910s).
2: Admission Laws: Restriction Era (1920s–Present).
3: Adoption.
4: Africa, East.
5: Africa, Southern.
6: Africa, West.
7: African Americans.
8: Agriculture.
9: American Emigration Abroad.
10: American Revolution, Immigrants and the.
11: American West, Immigrants in the.
12: America's Image in the Global Imagination.
13: Amnesty.
14: Andean Countries.
15: Anti–Illegal Immigration Policies and Politics at the State and Local Levels (2001–Present).
16: Anti-Immigrant Backlash (1965–2001).
17: Anti-Immigrant Politics.
18: Anti-Muslim Xenophobia, Impact of 9/11.
19: Armenia.
20: Art and Architecture.
21: Asia, South and Central.
22: Asia, Southeast.
23: Assimilation, Segmented.
24: Bilingual Education.
25: Brazil and the Southern Cone.
26: Buddhism.
27: Canada.
28: Caribbean, English-Speaking.
29: Caribbean, French-Speaking.
30: Catholicism.
31: Causes, Processes, and Patterns (Overview).
32: Census, U.S..
33: Central America.
34: Chain Migration.
35: Chicago.
36: Children and Adolescents.
37: China.
38: Chinese and the Chinese Exclusion Act.
39: Civil Rights of Immigrants.
40: Civil War, Immigrants and the.
41: Collapse of Communism and Its Effects (1980s–1990s).
42: Crime, Immigrant.
43: Cuba.
44: Culture and Assimilation: Hybrid Identities (1880s–1920).
45: Demographic and Statistical Trends.
46: Developing World Immigrants: Coming to America (1965–1990s).
47: Developing World Immigrants: Life in America (1965–1990s).
48: Dominican Republic.
49: Early Nineteenth-Century Immigration.
50: Early Spanish Settlers.
51: Eastern Rite Christianity.
52: Economic Benefits and Costs of Immigration.
53: Economic Pull Factors.
54: Economic Push Factors.
55: Elderly.
56: English as a Second Language.
57: Entrepreneurship.
58: Espionage, Immigrants and.
59: Ethnic Intermarriage.
60: Europe, Eastern and Central.
61: Europe, Northern and Western.
62: Evangelical Christianity.
63: Family.
64: Film and Broadcast Media.
65: First Red Scare.
66: Food.
67: Free Immigration (to 1800).
68: Gender.
69: Genealogy: Searching for Roots.
70: German-Speaking Political Refugees and Economic Migrants.
71: Germany.
72: Global Economy and Immigration.
73: Great Britain.
74: Great Irish Immigration (1840s–1850s).
75: Greece.
76: Health.
77: Health Care.
78: Higher Education and Science.
79: Hinduism and Sikhism.
80: History (Overview).
81: Home-Country Economy, Impact on.
82: Homeland Connections.
83: Housing.
84: Houston.
85: Human Smuggling and the Business of Illegal Immigration.
86: Human Trafficking and Slavery.
87: Illegal Immigrant Identification.
88: Illegal Immigrants and Amnesty Policy, Impact of 9/11.
89: Immigrant Aid Societies and Organizations.
90: Immigrant Politics: Activism.
91: Immigrant Politics: Electoral Politics.
92: Immigrant Politics: The Home Country.
93: Immigrant Status, Rights, and Privileges.
94: Immigrant–Minority Relations (1965–2001).
95: Immigration Agencies and Enforcement: The INS and Its Predecessors.
96: Immigration Agencies and Government Organizations (2001–Present).
97: Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965.
98: Immigration Law and Enforcement, Impact of 9/11.
99: Immigration Legislation (2001–Present).
100: Immigration Reform (1980s–1990s).
101: Immigration Stations (1880s–1920).
102: Income and Wealth.
103: Indentured Servants.
104: Industrial Labor (1880s–1920).
105: Internal Migration to 1865.
106: International Law and Immigration.
107: International Perspectives (Overview).
108: International Politics and Immigration.
109: Internet.
110: Internment of Japanese and Others During World War II.
111: Iran.
112: Ireland.
113: Islam.
114: Italy.
115: Japan.
116: Judaism and Jews.
117: Korea.
118: Labor Markets.
119: Language.
120: Latino Immigration (1920–1965).
121: Literature in English.
122: Living Conditions: The Urban Experience (1880s–1900).
123: Local Governments and Immigration.
124: Los Angeles.
125: Marriage and Spousal Immigration.
126: Media Portrayal.
127: Mental Health.
128: Mexico.
129: Miami.
130: Middle East and North Africa.
131: Music.
132: Nations of Origin and U.S. Destinations (Overview).
133: Native Americans.
134: Nativism and Know-Nothings (1800–1860).
135: Nativist Reaction (1920–1965).
136: Natural Disasters and Environmental Crises.
137: “New Immigration” (1880s–1920).
138: New Orleans.
139: New York City.
140: Oceania.
141: Philippines.
142: Poland.
143: Political, Ethnic, Religious, and Gender-Related Persecution.
144: Popular Culture.
145: Poverty.
146: Press.
147: Professionals and the Brain Drain.
148: Protestantism, Mainline.
149: Public Opinion and Immigration.
150: Public Schools.
151: Puerto Rico.
152: Puritans and Other Colonial Religious Groups.
153: Restrictive Legislation and Quotas (1920–1965).
154: Return Migration.
155: Rural America.
156: San Francisco.
157: Service Sector.
158: Settlement Patterns.
159: Slave Trade.
160: Social Services.
161: Society, Culture, and Politics (Overview).
162: Southeast Asian Refugee Crisis (1975–1980).
163: Sponsorship of U.S. Immigrants.
164: Sports.
165: State Governments and Immigration.
166: Statistical Overview, 1965–2000.
167: Statistical Overview, Since 2000.
168: Suburban America.
169: Sweatshops and Factories.
170: Taiwan and Hong Kong.
171: Theater.
172: Underground Economy.
173: Unions and Union Organizing.
174: U.S.–Mexican Border Control (2001–Present).
175: War Refugees (1920–1965).
176: Wars and Civil Unrest.
177: Washington, D.C..
178: Welfare and Public Benefits.
Primary Documents.
Revolutionary War Correspondence of George Washington (1775–1778).
Letters from an American Farmer, J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur (1782).
Article I, Sections 8 and 9, the U.S. Constitution (1787).
An Act to Establish an Uniform Rule of Naturalization (1790).
Look Before You Leap, Anonymous (1796).
Alien Act (1798).
History of the English Settlement in Edwards County, Illinois, George Flower (1817–1818).
Plea for Change of Venue by James Brown, Petitioner in Case to Retrieve Runaway Indentured Servants (1819).
Manifest of Immigrants Act (1819).
Selections from Letters Written During a Tour through the United States, in the Autumn of 1819, Emanuel Howitt (1819).
Imminent Dangers, Samuel Morse (1835).
Stimulating Emigration from Ireland, Court Deposition by Michael Gaugan (1837).
Four Years of Irish History, 1845–1849, Charles Gavan Duffy (1883).
Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848).
The United States of North America, with Particular Consideration Paid to German Emigration There, Gottfried Menzel (1853).