eBook Documenting America: The Primary Source Documents of a Nation: The American Revolution and the Young Republic, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1615307168
  • ISBN-13: 9781615307166
  • DDC: 973.2
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - 12th Grade
  • 160 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2012 | Published/Released April 2012
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2012
  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Struggling against unjust taxation and British intervention in colonial affairs, the colonies that would come to be part of the United States of America were ripe for revolution in the late eighteenth century. Led by impassioned individuals, Americans waged a series of protests against the British that eventually led to the Revolutionary War and effectively culminated with the War of 1812. In this compelling volume, readers are introduced to the architects of American independence and their most ardent arguments against British rule, the events of the American Revolution, and the documents that helped shape a country.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
Introduction.
1: Prelude to Revolution.
2: North America After the Great War for the Empire.
3: The Tax Controversy.
4: Document: No Taxation Without Representation (1765).
5: Constitutional Differences with Britain.
6: Document: Soame Jenyns: The Objections to the Taxation of Our American Colonies Considered (1765).
7: The Continental Congress.
8: Getting Started.
9: Document: The Association of the Continental Congress (1774).
10: Division and Dissent.
11: Radical Action or Loyalism.
12: Document: The Necessity for Taking up Arms (1775).
13: Document: Thomas Paine: Plain Arguments for Independence [from Common Sense] (1776).
14: Document: The Declaration of Independence (1776).
15: The American Revolutionary War.
16: From Lexington to Yorktown.
17: Document: George Washington: On the Organization of the Army (1778).
18: Siege of Yorktown.
19: Treaty of Paris.
20: Foundations of the American Republic.
21: Sources of Strength.
22: Problems Before the Second Continental Congress.
23: Document: The Articles of Confederation (1781).
24: State Politics.
25: Document: The Constitution of Vermont (1777).
26: Document: Daniel Gray: The Causes of Shays's Rebellion (1786).
27: The Constitutional Convention.
28: The Influence of the Virginia and New Jersey Plans.
29: Balancing Power.
30: Sidebar: The Founding Fathers and Slavery.
31: The Response to Federalism.
32: Document: The Federalist Papers (1787–88).
33: Document: The Bill of Rights (1789).
34: The Social Revolution.
35: Slavery.
36: The Role of Women.
37: Document: Petition by Free African Americans for Equality under the Law (1791).
38: Document: Abigail Adams: Doubts about Independence (1775).
39: Legal Reform.
40: Religious Revivalism.
41: Document: A Plan of Union for Protestant Churches (1801).
42: From 1789 to 1816.
43: The Federalist Administration and the Formation of Parties.
44: Document: George Washington: Farewell Address (1796).
45: The Jeffersonian Republicans in Power.
46: Document: Thomas Jefferson: The Politics of the Louisiana Purchase (1803).
47: Madison as President and the War of 1812.
48: The Indian-American Problem.
49: Document: Red Jacket: Against White Missions Among the Indians (1805).
Conclusion.
Appendices (Documents).
No Taxation Without Representation (1765).
Soame Jenyns: The Objections to the Taxation of Our American Colonies Considered (1765).
The Association of the Continental Congress (1774).
The Necessity for Taking up Arms (1775).
Thomas Paine: Plain Arguments for Independence [from Common Sense] (1776).
The Declaration of Independence (1776).
George Washington: On the Organization of the Army (1778).
A Half-Pay and Pensionary Establishment.
Of Completing the Regiments and Altering Their Establishment.
The Articles of Confederation (1781).
The Constitution of Vermont (1777).
A Declaration of the Rights of the Inhabitants of the State of Vermont.
The Federalist Papers (1787–88).
Alexander Hamilton: The Federalist No. 1.
James Madison: The Federalist No. 14.
The Bill of Rights (1789).
Article I.
Article II.
Article III.
Article IV.
Article V.
Article VI.
Article VII.
Article VIII.
Article IX.
Article X.
Petition by Free African Americans for Equality under the Law (1791).
Abigail Adams: Doubts about Independence (1775).
A Plan of Union for Protestant Churches (1801).
George Washington: Farewell Address (1796).
Thomas Jefferson: The Politics of the Louisiana Purchase (1803).
I. Letter to John Breckinridge.
II. Letter to Breckinridge.
III. Proposed Constitutional Amendment.
Red Jacket: Against White Missions Among the Indians (1805).
Glossary.
Bibliography.
Index.