eBook The Great American Mosaic: An Exploration of Diversity in Primary Documents, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1610696131
  • ISBN-13: 9781610696135
  • DDC: 305.800973
  • Grade Level Range: 9th Grade - College Senior
  • 1744 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2015 | Published/Released January 2015
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2015
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Overview

This invaluable, four-volume compilation is a comprehensive source of documents that give voice to those who comprise the American mosaic, illustrating the experiences of racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Each volume focuses on a major racial/ethnic group: African Americans, American Indians, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and Latinos. Documents chosen by the editors for their utility and relevance to popular areas of study are organized into chronological periods from historical to contemporaryThe collection includes eyewitness accounts, legislation, speeches, and interviews. Together, they tell the story of America’s diverse population and enable readers to explore historical concepts and contexts from multiple viewpoints. Introductions for each volume and primary document provide background and history that help students understand and critique the material. The work also features a useful primary document guide, bibliographies, and indices to aid teachers, librarians, and students in class work and research.

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Other Frontmatter.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Contents.
General Introduction.
Volume Introduction.
Brief Guide to Primary Sources.
1: Revolutionary War Era and the Early Republic (1760–1830).
2: A Narrative of the Uncommon Sufferings, and Surprizing Delieverance of Briton Hammon, a Negro Man… (1760).
3: A Narrative of the Most Remarkable Particulars in the Life of James Albert Ukawsaw Gronniosaw, an African Prince, Written by Himself (1774).
4: Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia (1782).
5: Jupiter Hammon, An Address to the Negroes in the State of New-York (1787).
6: The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African (1789).
7: Fugitive Slave Act of 1793.
8: A Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Venture: A Native of Africa, but Resident above Sixty Years in the United States of America, Related by Himself (1798).
9: An Act to Prohibit the Importation of Slaves (1807).
10: Missouri Compromise (1820).
11: John Quincy Adams, Diary Entry on Slavery and the Missouri Compromise (March 3, 1820).
12: Thomas Jefferson, Letter to John Holmes (April 22, 1820).
13: Antebellum Slavery (1830–1860).
14: The Confessions of Nat Turner, the Leader of the Late Insurrection in Southampton, Virginia (1832).
15: Illinois State Legislator Abraham Lincoln Opposes Slavery (March 3, 1837).
16: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself (1845).
17: Frederick Douglass, “Farewell to the British People: An Address Delivered in London, England” (March 30, 1847).
18: Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, An American Slave, Written by Himself (1849).
19: The Life of Josiah Henson, Formerly a Slave, Now an Inhabitant of Canada, as Narrated by Himself (1849).
20: Francis Henderson, “Essay on Slavery Conditions” (1856).
21: Dred Scott v. John F. Sanford (March 6, 1857).
22: Abraham Lincoln, Speech on the Dred Scott Decision and Slavery (June 26, 1857).
23: Fifth Lincoln-Douglas Debate, Galesburg, Illinois (October 7, 1858).
24: Seventh Lincoln-Douglas Debate, Alton, Illinois (October 15, 1858).
25: Letters on American Slavery to the Editor of the London News (1860).
26: Frederick Douglass, “The Constitution of the United States: Is It Pro-Slavery or Anti-Slavery?” (March 26, 1860).
27: Civil War and Reconstruction (1861–1877).
28: Frederick Douglass, “Fighting Rebels with Only One Hand,” an Editorial in The North Star (September 1861).
29: Excerpt from The Gullah Proverbs of 1861.
30: The Negroes at Port Royal, Report of E. L. Pierce, to the Hon. Salmon P. Chase, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury (1862).
31: Emancipation Proclamation (1863).
32: Frederick Douglass, “What the Black Man Wants” (April 1865).
33: Paul Jennings, “A Colored Man's Reminiscences of James Madison” (1865).
34: Black Codes of Mississippi (1865).
35: Andrew Johnson, Civil Rights Bill Veto Message (1866).
36: Civil Rights Act (1866).
37: Fourteenth Amendment (1868).
38: Hiram R. Revels, Speech to the U.S. Senate (February 8, 1871).
39: Jim Crow (1877–1920).
40: D. Augustus Straker, First Annual Address to the Law Graduates of Allen University, Class 1884 (June 12, 1884).
41: “Emigration to Liberia,” Report of the Standing Committee on Emigration of the Board of Directors of the American Colonization Society (January 20, 1885).
42: Alexander Crummell, “Common Sense in Common Schooling” (September 13, 1886).
43: The Wonderful Eventful Life of Rev. Thomas James, by Himself (1887).
44: Frances E. W. Harper, “Light beyond the Darkness” (ca. 1890s).
45: George C. Rowe Clinton, “A Noble Life: Memorial Souvenir of Rev. Jos. C. Price, D.D.” (1894).
46: Sermon Preached by Rev. G. V. Clark, at Second Congregational Church, Memphis, Tenn. (June 16, 1895).
47: Booker T. Washington, “The Atlanta Compromise” Speech (1895).
48: Hugh M. Browne, “The Higher Education of the Colored People of the South” (1896).
49: Plessy v. Ferguson (1896).
50: A. D. Mayo, “How Shall the Colored Youth of the South Be Educated?” (1897).
51: James Weldon Johnson and John R. Johnson, “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” or, “The Negro National Anthem” (ca. 1897–1900).
52: Mary Church Terrell, “The Progress of Colored Women” (1898).
53: Richard T. Greener, Commentary on “The Progress of Colored Women” by Mary Church Terrell (1898).
54: Booker T. Washington, Interviewed on the Hardwick Bill in the Atlanta Constitution (1900).
55: W. E. B. Du Bois, “Of the Training of Black Men” (September 1902).
56: Oswald Garrison Villard, “The Negro in the Regular Army” (1903).
57: The Negro Development and Exposition Company of the U.S.A., “An Address to the American Negro” (1907).
58: Harlem Renaissance through World War II (1920–1950).
59: W. E. B. Du Bois, “The Souls of White Folk” (1920).
60: Walter White, “The Eruption of Tulsa” (June 29, 1921).
61: Alain Locke, The Harlem Number of The Survey Graphic, Vol. 6, No. 6 (March 1925).
62: Alain Locke, “Enter the New Negro” (March 1925).
63: Dorothy West, Amateur Night in Harlem, “That's Why Darkies Were Born” (1938).
64: Dorothy West, Game Songs and Rhymes, Interview with Mrs. Laura M. (October 1938).
65: Frank Byrd, “Afternoon in a Pushcart Peddler's Colony” (December 1938).
66: Theodore Poston, “Matt Henson, North Pole Explorer Retires” (1938–1939).
67: Alfred O. Phillipp, “Midlothian, Illinois: A Folklore in the Making” (1939).
68: Garnett Laidlaw Eskew, “Coonjine in Manhattan” (1939).
69: Ellis Williams, “Down in the West Indies” (January 1939).
70: Vivian Morris, “Laundry Workers” (March 1939).
71: Betty Burke, “Jim Cole, Negro Packinghouse Worker” (July 1939).
72: Ina B. Hawkes, “Negro Life on a Farm, Mary Johnson” (October 27, 1939).
73: Al Thayer, as Told to Frank Byrd, “Harlem Parties” (1939–1940).
74: Mitchell v. United States (1941).
75: O'Neill Carrington, “In a Harlem Cabaret” (1942).
76: James Baldwin, “Rendezvous with Life: An Interview with Countee Cullen” (1942).
77: President Harry S. Truman, Executive Order 9981 (July 26, 1948).
78: Civil Rights Movement (1950–1970).
79: Ralph J. Bunche, Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech (1950).
80: FBI Investigation of Malcolm X (1953–1964).
81: Brown v. Board of Education (1954).
82: Robert C. Weaver, “Negro as an American” (1963).
83: President Lyndon B. Johnson, Address Before a Joint Session of the Congress (November 27, 1963).
84: Civil Rights Act of 1964.
85: President Lyndon B. Johnson, Radio and Television Remarks Upon Signing the Civil Rights Bill (July 2, 1964).
86: Voting Rights Act of 1965.
87: Equal Employment Opportunity Act (1965).
88: Loving v. Virginia (1967).
89: Post–Civil Rights Era and the New Millennium (1970–Present).
90: Combahee River Collective Statement (1977).
91: Patterson v. McLean Credit Union (1989).
92: Civil Rights Act of 1991.
93: Anita Hill, Testimony to Senate Judiciary Committee during the Confirmation Hearing of Clarence Thomas to the U.S. Supreme Court (October 11, 1991).
94: Million Man March: Pledge (1995).
95: Clarence Thomas, “I Am a Man, a Black Man, an American” (1998).
96: Harold Ford Jr., 2000 Democratic National Convention Keynote Address, (August 15, 2000).
97: President George W. Bush, Directive on Racial Profiling, and Attorney General John Ashcroft, Response to the President's Directive (2001).
98: Grutter v. Bollinger (2003).
99: Barack Obama, 2004 Democratic National Convention Keynote Address (July 27, 2004).
100: Rev. Al Sharpton, 2004 Democratic National Convention Address (July 28, 2004).
101: Barack Obama, “A More Perfect Union” Speech (March 18, 2008).
102: Barack Obama, Election Day Speech (November 4, 2008).
103: President Barack Obama, Remarks on the Arrest of Professor Henry Louis Gates (2009).
104: Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin (2013).
105: President Barack Obama, Remarks on the Trayvon Martin Case (July 2013).
Selected Bibliography.
Volume 1 Index.
About the Editors.
Title Page.
Contents.
Volume Introduction.
1: Creation Stories and First Contact to 1715.
2: Anishinabe Creation Story.
3: Aztec (Mexica) Creation Story.
4: Luiseño Creation Story.
5: “The Creation of Beginning” (Navajo/Dine).
6: Onondaga Creation Story.
7: Oneida Creation Story.
8: Thompson River Indians Creation Story.
9: White Mountain Apache Creation Story.
10: A Legend of Crater Lake.
11: The Great Law of Peace (Gayanashagowa) (Iroquois Nation).
12: Response to the Spanish by Aztec Priests (1524).
13: Powhatan, “Why Should You Destroy Us, Who Have Provided You with Food?” (1609).
14: Miantinomo, “Brother, We Must Be One as the English Are, or We Shall Soon All Be Destroyed” (1642–1643).
15: Dialogue between Piumbukhou and His Unconverted Relatives (ca. 1671).
16: The Conversion of Daniel Garakontié, an Onondaga (1671–1672).
17: Metacom's Grievances (ca. 1675).
18: A Micmac Questions French “Civilization” (ca. 1677).
19: An Indian's Decision to Become a Christian (1679).
20: Pedro Naranjo, “As They Had Been in Ancient Times,” an Account of the Pueblo Revolt (1680).
21: Declaration of a Rebellious Christian Indian in the Pueblo Revolt (1680).
22: Imperial Crisis (1716–1826).
23: Chekilli, Origin of the Creek Confederacy (1735).
24: Atiwaneto Resists Colonial Expansion (1752).
25: Minavavana, “Englishman!—You Know that the French King Is Our Father” (1761).
26: Pontiac Describes Neolin's Vision (1763).
27: Dragging Canoe, “We Will Have Our Lands!” (1775).
28: Corn Tassel, Speech about the Treaty of Long Island (1777).
29: Chickasaw Chief's Message to Congress (1783).
30: Joseph Brant, Message to Governor Frederick Haldimand (1783).
31: United Indian Nations, Speech at the Confederate Council (1786).
32: Saukamappee, Memories of War and Smallpox (1787–1788).
33: Cornplanter, Half Town, and Big Tree Remind President George Washington of the Iroquois's Role in the American Revolution (1790).
34: Red Jacket, “You Have Got Our Country, But Are Not Satisfied; You Want to Force Your Religion upon Us” (1805).
35: Tenkswatawa, the Shawnee Prophet, Speech to Indiana Territory Governor William Henry Harrison (1808).
36: Shawnee Chief Tecumseh, Address to William Henry Harrison (ca. 1810).
37: Tecumseh, “Sleep Not Longer, O Choctaws and Chickasaws” (1811).
38: Tecumseh, “Let the White Race Perish” (1811).
39: Pushmatah, “We Do Not Take Up the Warpath without a Just Cause and Honest Purpose” (1811).
40: Tecumseh, Speech to the Osages (Winter 1811–1812).
41: Cherokee Women's Petitions (1817, 1818, and 1831).
42: Metea, “You Are Never Satisfied,” an Address to U.S. Government Officials (1821).
43: Sharitarish, Address to President James Monroe (1822).
44: Elias Boudinot, “An Address to the Whites Delivered in the First Presbyterian Church on the 26th of May, 1826”.
45: Fighting the United States: Winning and Losing (1827–1877).
46: Constitution of the Cherokee Nation (1827).
47: Black Hawk Discusses the Institution of Slavery (1833).
48: Black Hawk Talks about the Coming of the Americans (1833).
49: William Apess, Narrative (1836).
50: Chief John Ross, “To the Senate and House of Representatives” (1836).
51: Memorial of Protest of the Cherokee Nation (1836).
52: George Copway, Narrative (1850).
53: Big Eagle, Account of the Dakota War (1862).
54: Little Bear, Account of the Sand Creek Massacre (1864).
55: Elsie Edwards, Interview, “Fort Gibson Civil War—Refugee Living Conditions” (ca. 1864).
56: Bear Head, Account of the Massacre on the Marias (1870).
57: Chief Red Cloud, Speech on Indian Rights (1870).
58: Strikes Two and Bear's Belly, Story of an Expedition under General George Custer to the Black Hills (1874).
59: Wooden Leg, Account of the Battle of the Little Bighorn (1876).
60: Crazy Horse, “We Preferred Our Own Way of Living” (1877).
61: Attempt to Regain the Past (1878–1920).
62: Chief Joseph, an Indian's View of Indian Affairs (1879).
63: Chief Joseph, “We Ask to Be Recognized as Men” (1879).
64: White Eagle, Statement Regarding the Removal of the Ponca Indians to Indian Territory (1879).
65: Sarah Winnemucca, Narrative (1883).
66: Sitting Bull, Report to a Senate Committee (1883).
67: Zitkala-Sa, “Impressions of an Indian Childhood: My Mother” (ca. 1883).
68: Lone Man, Account of the Death of Sitting Bull (1890).
69: Wovoka, Message to the Cheyennes and the Arapahos (ca. 1890).
70: Ghost Dance Songs (1890s).
71: Black Elk, Account of the Wounded Knee Massacre (1890).
72: Red Cloud, Speech on the Massacre at Wounded Knee (1891).
73: Simon Pokagon Offers the Red Man's Greeting (1893).
74: Charles Eastman, “The Laughing Philosopher” (1902).
75: Zitkala-Sa, “Why I Am a Pagan” (1902).
76: Geronimo, Narrative (1906).
77: Henry Roe Cloud, Education of the American Indian (1914).
78: Chauncey Yellow Robe, “The Menace of the Wild West Show” (1914).
79: Alice Becenti, A Navajo Writes Home from Boarding School (1914–1916).
80: Helen Sekaquaptewa, “Phoenix Indian School” (1915).
81: Arthur C. Parker, “Social Elements of the Indian Problem” (1916).
82: Carlos Montezuma, M.D., “Let My People Go” (1916).
83: Delos Lone Wolf, “How to Solve the Problem” (1916).
84: Elsie Clews Parsons, Recording of a Nativity Myth at Laguna (1918).
85: “Hunting Song” (Navajo) (1918).
86: Robert Yellowtail, Call for Self-Determination (1919).
87: Zitkala-Sa, Discussion of the Paris Peace Conference (1919).
88: “How Aua Became a Shaman” (1920s).
89: The Indian New Deal and a Turn to the Militant (1921–1973).
90: Joseph Medicine Crow, “What Has Happened to the Crow Indian Horses” (1922).
91: A Klamath Story (1922).
92: Luther Standing Bear Recalls His First Buffalo Hunt (1928).
93: Wooden Leg, “A Tamed Old Man” (1930).
94: Kay Bennett (Kaibah), “The White Man's Depression of 1930”.
95: Black Elk, “Across the Big Water” (1932).
96: Luther Standing Bear, “What the Indian Means to America” (1933).
97: Petition from Pine Ridge Sioux to Eleanor Roosevelt (1934).
98: Eva Spicer Whitetree Nichols Interview (April 21, 1937).
99: Esther Naktewa, Letter to Santa Claus (1937).
100: Mary Free, “Life of a Cherokee Woman” (1937).
101: Kate Shaw Ahrens Interview (1937).
102: Joe Medicine Crow, “Counting Coup and Capturing Horses” (1944).
103: House Concurrent Resolution 108 (August 1, 1953).
104: George Webb, “Progress” (1959).
105: Martin Thom, “A Statement Made for the Young People” (1964).
106: Clyde Warrior, “We Are Not Free” (1967).
107: Indian Civil Rights Act of 1968.
108: Sohappy v. Smith (1969).
109: John Borbridge, Testimony on the Land Rights of Native Alaskans (1969).
110: Taos Pueblo, New Mexico, Appeal to Congress for the Return of Blue Lake (1970).
111: Vine Deloria Jr., “This Country was a Lot Better Off When the Indians Were Running It” (1970).
112: Wamsutta James, Suppressed Speech for the 350th Anniversary Celebration of the Pilgrim's Arrival in the New World (1970).
113: “We Hold the Rock!” The Alcatraz Proclamation to the Great White Father and His People (1970).
114: All-Indian University and Cultural Complex on Indian Land (1970).
115: Native Alliance for Red Power (NARP) Eight-Point Program (ca. 1970).
116: Sandra Osawa, “To Be Indian in Los Angeles” (1971).
117: Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (December 18, 1971).
118: Menominee Restoration Act of 1973.
119: Coexistence (1974–Present).
120: United States v. Washington State (Boldt Decision) (1974).
121: Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (1975).
122: Leonard Peltier, Convicted of Being Chippewa and Sioux Blood (1977).
123: American Indian Religious Freedom Act (AIRFA) (1978).
124: Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) (1978).
125: United States v. Sioux Nation of Indians (1980).
126: Merrion v. Jicarilla Apache Tribe (1982).
127: Hodel v. Irving (1987).
128: House Concurrent Resolution 331 (1988).
129: Native American Grave Protection and Repatriation Act (1990).
130: White House Conference on Indian Education (1992).
131: Chief Oren Lyons Jr., Haudenosaunee Faithkeeper, Address to Delegates to the United Nations Organization to Open “The Year of the Indigenous Peoples” (1993) in the United Nations General Assembly Auditorium, United Nations Plaza, New York City (December 10, 1992).
132: Bonnie Ballard (Fort Hall Shoshone-Bannock), “No Matter What Happened to the Indians, We Will Always Have Our Spirit” (1996).
133: President Bill Clinton, Executive Order 13007, Indian Sacred Sites (May 24, 1996).
134: Minnesota v. Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians (March 24, 1999).
135: Title IX, Safety for Indian Women, Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) (2005).
136: Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2006).
137: Native American $1 Coin Act (2007).
138: Lieutenant Bill Cody Ayon (Southern Cheyenne), New Mexico National Guard, Interviewed at Camp Cropper, Iraq (September 16, 2007).
139: Cobell v. Salazar (2009).
140: Native American Heritage Day Act (2009).
141: Native American Apology Resolution (2009).
142: Tribal Law and Order Act (2010).
143: Claims Resolution Act, Title I (2010).
144: Interview with John EchoHawk (2012).
145: ’Twas the Night before Ojibwe Christmas (2012).
146: Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl (2013).
Selected Bibliography.
Volume 2 Index.
About the Editors.
Title Page.
Contents.
Volume Introduction.
1: General Asian American.
2: Page Law (1875).
3: National Origins Act (1924).
4: War Brides Act (1945).
5: McCarran-Walter Act (1952).
6: Asian American Movement: Documents Illustrating the San Francisco State Strike (1968–1969).
7: Indochina Migration and Refugee Assistance Act (1975).
8: Asian American Alliance, Political Committee, Columbia University (2006).
9: SAALT (South Asian Americans Leading Together), “Making the Case: Why Build a South Asian Identity” (2006).
10: Belinda Dronkers-Laureta, “Asian Family Values” (2008).
11: Hindu American Foundation, “Yoga Beyond Asana: Hindu Thought in Practice” (2010).
12: Momo Chang, “Who was Richard Aoki?: Community Reactions to Richard's Hidden Life” (2012).
13: American Samoans.
14: Amy Taxin, “Samoans Abroad Pray for Family Back Home” (2009).
15: Tafea Polamalu, “Diasporic Dream: Letter to Grandfather” (2009) and “Daddy Said” (2010).
16: Bangladeshi Americans.
17: Kanwal Rahman, Interview by Rajika Bhandari (July 15, 1999).
18: “Bangladesh in the Eyes of the Second Generation of Bangladeshi-Americans” (2004, 2006).
19: Farah Akbar, “A Troubling Cultural Gap” (2010).
20: Reihan Salam, “About Me” (2012).
21: Cambodian Americans.
22: Karen Kauv Sun, Interview by Janean Baker (1993).
23: Kong Phok, Interview by Barbara Lau (2000).
24: Ran Kong, Interview by Barbara Lau (2001).
25: Leendavy Koung, “You Cannot Lose Your Spirit” (2001).
26: Vatey Seng, The Price We Paid (2005).
27: Pete Pin, “The Cambodian Diaspora” (2012).
28: Chinese Americans.
29: The Golden Hills’ News, “The Chinese Exodus” (1854).
30: Kwang Chang Ling, “Letters of Kwang Chang Ling: The Chinese Side of the Chinese Question” (1878).
31: Woman's Union Mission of San Francisco (1881).
32: Transcript of the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882).
33: Tape v. Hurley (1885).
34: Yick Wo v. Hopkins (1886).
35: “An Address from the Workingmen of San Francisco to Their Brothers throughout the Pacific Coast” (1888).
36: Angel Island Poem, by One from Ziangshan (undated, ca. 1910–1940).
37: Case of Huey Jing and Huey Fong (1913).
38: Portland Tong Peace Agreement (1917).
39: Yee Wee Thing Betrayal Letter (1920).
40: Mary Young Chan, Marriage Certificate and Court Summons (1921).
41: Carol Green Wilson, Chinatown Quest (1931).
42: Charles Shepherd, “The Story of Lee, Wong and Ah Jing” (ca. 1933).
43: Ruth Chinn, Interview by Stafford Lewis (1938).
44: Wing Luke, Speech before Seattle's Chinese American Community (August 17, 1960).
45: John Dong, Interview by Elizabeth Calciano (1967).
46: Esther Don Tang, “Memories of Mother and Father” (1995) and “Thoughts on the Chinese Community Today” (2005).
47: Fred Pang, “Asian-Pacific Americans: Microcosm of Greater National Mix” (1997).
48: Sifu Cheung Shu Pui, “Chinatown without Lion Dancers Would Be a Community Filled with Regret” (2001).
49: Ted Tsukiyama, “Eulogy for Hung Wai Ching” (2002).
50: Maggie Gee, Interview by Leah McGarrigle, Robin Li, and Kathryn Stine (2003).
51: Eddie Fung, “Chinatown Kid, Texas Cowboy, Prisoner of War” (2007).
52: Eddy Zheng, “Autobiography @ 33” (2007).
53: Joy Wong, “The Whole Picture” (2008).
54: Beverly Chen, “The Strength of Sisters” (2008).
55: Kathy Wang, “Racism: An Amateur's Perspective” (2009).
56: Frances Kai-Hwa Wang, “From a Whisper to a Rallying Cry” (2009).
57: Adam Cheung, “Encounter with Crazy Ming” (2010).
58: Alice Shi Kembel, “My Mother's Purse” (2010).
59: Interview with Ching-Yu Hu (2013).
60: Filipino Americans.
61: Excerpt from Angeles Monrayo, Tomorrow's Memories: A Diary, 1924–1928 (1924).
62: Antonio E. Velasco, “Filipino Student Suffers from Pang of Race Prejudice” (1928).
63: Mariano Guiang, Interview by Carolina Koslosky (1976).
64: Apolonia Dangzalan, Interview by Meri Knaster (1977).
65: Frank Barba, Interview by Meri Knaster (1977).
66: Rufino F. Cacabelos, Autobiography (1992).
67: Excerpt from Evangeline Canonizado Buell, Twenty-Five Chickens and a Pig for a Bride: Growing Up in a Filipino Immigrant Family (2006).
68: Robert Bernardo, “Strangers Among Us” (2006) and Interview with Eliyahu Enriquez (2009).
69: Catherine Ceniza Choy, “How to Stand Up and Dive” (2007).
70: Gem P. Daus, “Discovering Carlos Bulosan” (2010).
71: Robert Francis Flor, “Alaskero Memories” (2010).
72: Eliyahu Enriquez, “Inquisitory Karma” and “Mahogany Mantle” (2010).
73: Cynthia Vasallo, “Most American” (2010).
74: Blue Scholars, “Yuri Kochiyama” (2011).
75: Guamanian Americans.
76: Hartley Ochavillo, “Leaving Guam” (2009).
77: Mike Blas, “Hafa Adai” (2013).
78: Native Hawaiian Americans.
79: Ke Ali'i Bernice Pauahi Paki Bishop, “Will and Codicils” (1883).
80: Lili'uokalani, Hawai'i's Story by Hawai'i's Queen (1898).
81: U.S. Public Law 103-150, the “Apology Resolution” (1993).
82: Hawaiian Constitutional Convention (2008).
83: Waiola Church, “History” and “Culture” (2008).
84: M. J. Halelaukoa Garvin, “How Do You See Yourself?“(2009).
85: Native Hawaiian Federal Recognition Act, S. 381 (2010).
86: Himalayan Americans.
87: Anonymous, “Migyul Youth” Questions and Answers (2005).
88: Sonam G. Sherpa, “My Identity” and “As American as Apple Pie. What's in a Name?” (2005).
89: Roshani Adhikary, “Nepali Grrl Blues” (2005).
90: Tenzin Shakya, “Living as ‘Other’ in the U.S.A.” (2008).
91: Shilpa Lama, “One Nepalese Woman's Journey to America” (2009).
92: Bhuchung K. Tsering, “Enter the Tibetan Americans” (2009).
93: Prem and Kumari Tamang, Interview by Emily Moberg Robinson (2010).
94: Hmong Americans.
95: Pang Xiong Sirirathasuk Sikoun, Interview by Sally Peterson (2006).
96: Chao Xiong, “Waiting, ‘Not Knowing If They Are Even Alive’” (2007) and Sheng Xiong, “Address to the United States National Press Club” (2009).
97: Critical Hmong Studies Collective, “Persistent Invisibility: Hmong Americans Are Silenced” (2008).
98: Katie Ka Vang, “Uncle's Visit” (2008).
99: Noukou Thao, “Dowry” (2009).
100: Sheng Yang and Sami Scripter, Cooking from the Heart (2009).
101: May Lee-Yang and Katie Ka Vang, Interview by Bakka Magazine (2009).
102: Bee Vang and Louisa Schein, “A Conversation on Race and Acting” (2010).
103: Indian Americans.
104: Mary Bamford, Angel Island: The Ellis Island of the West (1917).
105: United States Supreme Court, U.S. v. Bhagat Sing Thind, 261 U.S. 204 (1923).
106: Mary T. Mathew, Interview by Rashmi Varna (1999).
107: Anita Chawla, Interview by Peggy Bulger (2001).
108: DJ Rekha, Interview by Demetrius Cheeks (2007).
109: Sweta Srivastava Vikram, “Racist or a Victim?” (2009).
110: Athena Kashyap, Four Poems (2009).
111: Rajiv Srinivasan, “My Battle Within: The Identity Crisis of a Hindu Soldier in the U.S. Army” (2009).
112: Ainee Fatima, “To My Mother,” “Blues from a Black Burqah,” and “Graceland Part I” (2009).
113: Sanjay Patel, Interview by Grain Edit (2010).
114: Indonesian Americans.
115: Nadia Syahmalina, “Kamu Bukan Orang Sini” (2001).
116: Peter Phwan, “Game of Chance: Chinese Indonesians Play Asylum Roulette in the United States” (2009).
117: William Wright, “Indonesian Makes New Life in America” (2009).
118: Japanese Americans.
119: Joseph Heco, The Narrative of a Japanese; What He Has Seen and the People He Has Met in the Course of the Last Forty Years (1895).
120: George Henry Himes, “An Account of the First Japanese Native in Oregon” (ca. 1904).
121: The Gentlemen's Agreement (1907–1908).
122: Alien Land Law, California (1913).
123: Ryu Kishima, Deportation Documents (1936).
124: Executive Order 9066 (1942) and Evacuation Poster, “Instructions to All Persons of Japanese Ancestry Living in the Following Area” (1942).
125: 442nd Regimental Combat Team, Monthly Report (1944) and Letter of Commendation (1945).
126: Hayao Chuman, Letters and Affidavit (1946–1967).
127: Territory of Hawai'i Legislature, House Resolution No. 61 (1955).
128: Fred Korematsu, Writ of Coram Nobis (1984).
129: Hiroshi Shikuma, Interview by Randall Jarrell (1986).
130: Milton Murayama, Five Years on a Rock (1994).
131: Naeko Isagawa Keen, Interview by Daniel Clark (1995).
132: Alice Ohashi Kuroiwa, “Life and Education of the Older Children of Immigrant Parents (born between 1910–1925)” (1996).
133: Brenda Wong Aoki, “Uncle Gunjiro's Girlfriend: The True Story of the First Hapa Baby” (1998).
134: Ryo Imamura, Interview by Stephen Fugita and Erin Kimura (1999).
135: Bruce Yamashita, A Most Unlikely Hero (2003).
136: LaVerne Sasaki, “Tule Lake Pilgrimage Memorial” and Jeanette Shin, “Transformations” (2006).
137: Fumitaka Matsuoka, “Benediction at the GTU Graduates of Color Ceremony” (2008).
138: Yuri Kochiyama, Interview by Amy Goodman (2008).
139: University of California Senate Resolution to Award Honorary Degrees to Japanese American Internees (2009).
140: Patrick Hayashi, Honorary Degree Ceremony Remarks (2009).
141: Wendy Maruyama, Interview by Joyce Lovelace (2009).
142: Stuart Hada, “Small Satisfactions” (2009).
143: Charlene Gima, “Odori Story” (2009).
144: Midwest Buddhist Temple, Ginza Festival (2010).
145: Dean Koyama, “The Fullness of Obon” (2010).
146: Korean Americans.
147: Han Bong Soon, Immigration Interview (1940).
148: Lucy, “‘Lucy’ Sails for 'Frisco” (1954).
149: Chong Chin Joe, “This Life of Mine” (1967).
150: Sook-ja Kim, Interview by Myong-ja Lee Kwon (February–April 1996).
151: Sonia Sunoo, Interview by Anna Charr Kim (January 17, 2001).
152: Phil Yu, “Keepin’ It Real with the Rice Fields” (2001).
153: Jenny Ryun Foster and Jae Ran Kim, Korean American Adoption (2002 and 2006).
154: You Mi Kim, “Diary of a Sex Slave” (2006).
155: Letters on the Korean “Lost Colony” (2009).
156: Lao Americans.
157: Interview with Ou Chiew Saetern; Letter from His Sister (2003).
158: Bryan Thao Worra, “Asian-Americans Must Speak Up” (2005).
159: Xuliyah Potong, “Adopted American” (2007).
160: Takashi Matsumoto, “Finding Takashi” 2008.
161: Malaysian Americans.
162: Shymala Dason, “Outside His Window” (2010).
163: Pakistani Americans.
164: “Salman Ahmad in the News” (2006).
165: Wajahat Ali, “The Perpoose Story: The Minority Preschool Experience” (2008).
166: Asma Hasan, Interview by Nadia Mohammad (2008).
167: Mariam Malik, “We Are All Punjabi” (2009).
168: Aman Ali and Bassam Tariq, “Day 30: Celebration” (2009).
169: Asma Uddin, “Exploring Gender and Islam” (2010).
170: Farha Hasan, “The Decree” (2010).
171: Sri Lankan Americans.
172: Vasugi V. Ganeshananthan, “It's All in a Name” (1999).
173: Poornima Apte, “9/11: A Mother Remembers” (2004).
174: Dilini Palamakumbura, “My Dream” (2005).
175: Thai Americans.
176: Jeffery Boonmee, Interview by David Tanner (1995).
177: Pueng Vongs, “Unrest in the Homeland Awakens Thai American Community” (2006).
178: Dionne Jirachaikitti, “Thai American Organizing and the Berkeley Thai Temple” (2009).
179: Vietnamese Americans.
180: Club O'Noodles, “Laughter from the Children of War,” Performance Program (1996).
181: Hi-Tek Demonstration Flyer, “America Has Freedom” (1999).
182: Tuan-Rishard F. Schneider, “Adoptee Connection” (2001).
183: Anh Do and Hieu Tran Pham, “Camp Z30-D: The Survivors: 1975–2001” (2001).
184: Trista Joy Goldberg, “Trista” (2004).
185: Diu Hoang, “The Back of the Hand: Vietnamese American Nail Salons” (2006).
186: Sumeia Williams, “Memorial Inheritance” (2006).
187: Kevin Minh Allen, “Eggroll” (2006).
188: Bác Nguyen Vân Phuong, Interview by Xuan Thanh Le (2008).
189: Julie Pham, “Modern Day McCarthyism: The Case of Duc Tan” (2009).
190: Nguyen Thi Hanh Nhon, Interview by Nancy Bui (2010).
191: Multiheritage Asian Americans.
192: Sui Sin Far/Edith Maude Eaton, “Its Wavering Image” (1912).
193: Alison Kim, Interview by Jacquelyn Marie (2001).
194: David Fleming, “Hello, I'm Japanese: Scott Fujita Is Helping to Bring the Saints Back to Life. And That's the Least Surprising Thing about Him” (2006).
195: JoAnn Balingit, Three Poems and an Essay (2007).
196: Chloe Sun, “Against Overwhelming Odds: Chinese Women in Ministry” (2007).
197: Simone Momove Fujita, “Little Momo i