eBook Cognitive Informatics in Health and Biomedicine, 1st Edition

  • Published By:
  • ISBN-10: 1447154908
  • ISBN-13: 9781447154907
  • DDC: 610.28563
  • Grade Level Range: College Freshman - College Senior
  • 505 Pages | eBook
  • Original Copyright 2014 | Published/Released April 2015
  • This publication's content originally published in print form: 2014
  • Price:  Sign in for price

About

Overview

Enormous advances in information technology have permeated essentially all facets of life in the past two decades. Formidable challenges remain in fostering tools that enhance productivity but are sensitive to work practices. Cognitive Informatics (CI) is the multidisciplinary study of cognition, information and computational sciences that investigates all facets of human computing including design and computer-mediated intelligent action, thus is strongly grounded in methods and theories from cognitive science. As an applied discipline, it has a close affiliation with human factors and human-computer interaction, and provides a framework for the analysis and modeling of complex human performance in technology-mediated settings and contributes to the design and development of better information systems. In recent years, CI has emerged as a distinct area with special relevance to biomedicine and health care. In addition, it has become a foundation for education and training of health informaticians, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology initiating a program including CI as one of its critical elements to support health IT curriculum development. This book represents a first textbook on cognitive informatics and will focus on key examples drawn from the application of methods and theories from CI to challenges pertaining to the practice of critical-care medicine (CCM). Technology is transforming critical care workflows  and re-organizing patient care management processes. CCM has proven to be a fertile test bed for theories and methods of cognitive informatics. CI, in turn, has contributed much to our understanding of the factors that result in complexity and patient errors. The topic is strongly interdisciplinary and will be important for individuals from a range of academic and professional backgrounds, including critical care specialists, psychologists, computer scientists, medical informaticians, and anthropologists.​​

Table of Contents

Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Dedication Page.
Foreword.
Preface.
Contents.
Contributors.
1: Complexity and Errors in Critical Care.
2: Cognition and Errors.
3: A Framework for Understanding Error and Complexity in Critical Care.
4: Failed Detection of Egregious Errors in Clinical Case Scenarios.
5: Teamwork and Error Management in Critical Care.
6: Error Recovery in the Wilderness of ICU.
7: Training for Error Detection in Simulated Clinical Rounds.
8: Characterizing the Nature of Work and Forces for Decision Making in Emergency Care.
9: Adaptive Behaviors in Complex Clinical Environments.
10: Standard Solutions for Complex Settings: The Idiosyncrasies of a Weaning Protocol Use in Practice.
11: Enhancing Medical Decision Making When Caring for the Critically Ill: The Role of Cognitive Heuristics and Biases.
12: Communication.
13: Communication and Complexity: Negotiating Transitions in Critical Care.
14: Falling Through the Cracks: Investigation of Care Continuity in Critical Care Handoffs.
15: Bridging Gaps in Handoff Communication: A Comparative Evaluation of Information Organization Tools.
16: Investigating Shared Mental Models in Critical Care.
17: Clinical Artifacts as a Treasure Map to Navigate Handoff Complexity.
18: Clinical Workflow.
19: Re-thinking Complexity in the Critical Care Environment.
20: Automated Workflow Analysis and Tracking Using Radio Frequency Identification Technology.
21: Sub-optimal Patterns of Information Use: A Rational Analysis of Information Seeking Behavior in Critical Care.
22: The Effects of Structuring Clinical Rounds on Communication and Efficiency.
23: Looking into the Future.
24: Clinical Implications of Cognitive Complexity in Critical Care.
25: Large Scale Cognitive Error in Critical Care: The Adoption of “Best Practices” That Are Either Ineffective or Harm Patients.
26: Newly-Acquired Complex Performance Competence and Medical Errors.
27: Reflections on the Role of Cognitive Science in Biomedical Informatics.
Epilogue.
Glossary.
Index.
Front Cover.
Half Title Page.
Title Page.
Copyright Page.
Dedication Page.
Foreword.
Preface.
Contents.
Contributors.
1: Complexity and Errors in Critical Care.
2: Cognition and Errors.
3: A Framework for Understanding Error and Complexity in Critical Care.
4: Failed Detection of Egregious Errors in Clinical Case Scenarios.
5: Teamwork and Error Management in Critical Care.
6: Error Recovery in the Wilderness of ICU.
7: Training for Error Detection in Simulated Clinical Rounds.
8: Characterizing the Nature of Work and Forces for Decision Making in Emergency Care.
9: Adaptive Behaviors in Complex Clinical Environments.
10: Standard Solutions for Complex Settings: The Idiosyncrasies of a Weaning Protocol Use in Practice.
11: Enhancing Medical Decision Making When Caring for the Critically Ill: The Role of Cognitive Heuristics and Biases.
12: Communication.
13: Communication and Complexity: Negotiating Transitions in Critical Care.
14: Falling Through the Cracks: Investigation of Care Continuity in Critical Care Handoffs.
15: Bridging Gaps in Handoff Communication: A Comparative Evaluation of Information Organization Tools.
16: Investigating Shared Mental Models in Critical Care.
17: Clinical Artifacts as a Treasure Map to Navigate Handoff Complexity.
18: Clinical Workflow.
19: Re-thinking Complexity in the Critical Care Environment.
20: Automated Workflow Analysis and Tracking Using Radio Frequency Identification Technology.
21: Sub-optimal Patterns of Information Use: A Rational Analysis of Information Seeking Behavior in Critical Care.
22: The Effects of Structuring Clinical Rounds on Communication and Efficiency.
23: Looking into the Future.
24: Clinical Implications of Cognitive Complexity in Critical Care.