Nicaragua: Political Instability and U.S. Intervention, 1910-1933

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The United States occupation of Nicaragua was part of the larger conflict known as the Banana Wars. The formal occupation began in 1912, although several other operations were conducted before the full scale invasion. United States military interventions in Nicaragua were intended to prevent the construction of the Nicaraguan Canal by any nation but the United States. Nicaragua assumed a quasi-protectorate status under the 1916 Chamorro-Bryan Treaty. The occupation ended as Augusto César Sandino, a Nicaraguan revolutionary, led guerrilla armies against U.S. troops. The onset of the Great Depression made it costly for the U.S. government to maintain the occupation so a withdrawal was ordered in 1933. Comprising records of the State Department’s Central Classified Files, this collection contains records relating to the internal affairs of India, during the period 1945-1949. The records include instructions sent to and correspondence received by the State Department; the State Department’s internal documentation, as well as correspondence between the Department and other federal departments and agencies, Congress, and private individuals and organizations; telegrams, airgrams, instructions, inquiries, studies, memoranda, situation reports, translations, special reports, plans, and official and unofficial correspondence.

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Archives Unbound Series

Introducing Archives Unbound -- a vast new resource that combines the best of legacy microfilms from Gale and Primary Source Media and new, never-before-filmed collections. Specifically developed to address the needs of individual scholars, universities, and organizations, Archives Unbound is unique not only for its expansive, multi-disciplinary content but also for the distinct new intuitive search platform by which it is accessed.

Features and Benefits

  • This collection of U.S. State Department Central Classified Files relating to internal and foreign affairs contains a wide range of materials from U.S. diplomats.
  • Special reports on political and military affairs.
  • Studies and statistics on socioeconomic matters.
  • Interviews and minutes of meetings with foreign government officials.
  • Full texts of letters, instructions, and cables sent and received by U.S. diplomatic personnel.
  • Reports and translations from foreign journals and newspapers.
  • Translations of high-level foreign government documents, including speeches, memoranda, official reports, and transcripts of political meetings and assemblies.