Higher Education

Thinking Through the Past, Volume II, 5th Edition

  • John Hollitz Community College of Southern Nevada
  • ISBN-10: 1285427440  |  ISBN-13: 9781285427447
  • 400 Pages
  • Previous Editions: 2010, 2005, 2001
  • © 2015 | Published
  • College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $83.25
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About

Overview

This reader for the U.S. history survey course gives students the opportunity to apply critical thinking skills to the examination of historical sources, providing pedagogy and background information to help them draw substantive conclusions. The careful organization and the context provided in each chapter make the material accessible for students, thereby assisting instructors in engaging their students in analysis and discussion.

Features and Benefits

  • Both primary and secondary sources are used to give students the opportunity to analyze primary documents and historians' arguments together, and to use one document to help understand and evaluate the other.
  • The reader advances chronologically and pedagogically through different skill levels. This provides students the opportunity to work with primary sources in the early chapters, before they evaluate secondary sources in later chapters or compare historians' arguments in the final chapters. Using this method, students are able to build on the skills acquired in previous chapters by considering such questions as motivation, causation, and the role of ideas and economic interests in history.
  • Each chapter is divided into five parts: Introduction, which sets forth the problem in the chapter; Setting, which provides background information pertaining to the topic; Investigation, which asks students to answer a short set of questions revolving around the problem discussed in the Introduction; Sources, which in most chapters comprise a secondary source and a set of primary sources related to the chapter's main problem; and Conclusion, which offers a reminder of the chapter's main pedagogical goal and looks forward to the next chapter's problem.

Table of Contents

1. HISTORIANS AND TEXTBOOKS: THE “STORY” OF RECONSTRUCTION.
Secondary Sources: Reconstruction (1906). The Negro in Reconstruction (1922). The Ordeal of Reconstruction (1966). Reconstruction: An Unfinished Revolution (2001).
2. USING PRIMARY SOURCES: INDUSTRIALIZATION AND THE CONDITION OF LABOR.
Primary Sources: Testimony of Workingmen (1879). “Earnings, Expenses and Conditions of Workingmen and Their Families” (1884). “Human Power. . . Is What We Are Losing” (1910). Why We Struck at Pullman (1895). Colored Workmen and a Strike (1887). “I Struck Because I Had To” (1902). Women Make Demands (1869). Summary of Conditions Among Women Workers Found by the Massachusetts Bureau of Labor (1887). A Union Official Discusses the Impact of Women Workers (1897). Work in a Garment Factory (1902). Gainful Workers by Age, 1870-1920. Breaker Boys (1906).
3. EVALUATING PRIMARY SOURCES: “SAVING” THE INDIANS IN THE LATE NINETEENTH CENTURY.
Primary Sources: “Land and Law as Agents in Educating Indians” (1885). The Dawes Act (1887). A Cheyenne Tells His Son About the Land (ca. 1876). Cheyennes Try Farming (ca. 1877). A Sioux Recalls Severalty (ca. 1900). Supervised Indian Land Holdings by State, 1881–1933. A Proposal for Indian Education (1888). Instructions to Indian Agents and Superintendents of Indian Schools (1889). The Education of Indian Students at Carlisle (1891). Luther Standing Bear Recalls Carlisle (1933). Wohaw''s Self-Portrait (1877). Taking an Indian Child to School (1891). A Crow Medicine Woman on Teaching the Young (1932). Percentage of Population Over Ten Illiterate, 1900–1930.
4. EVALUATING A HISTORICAL ARGUMENT: AMERICAN MANHOOD AND PHILIPPINE ANNEXATION.
Secondary Source: Male Degeneracy and the Allure of the Philippines (1998). Primary Sources: “Recommended by Hoar” (1899). “The Anti-Expansion Ticket for 1900” (1899). “The White Man''s Burden” (1899). “The Filipino''s First Bath” (1899). “The Strenuous Life” (1899). William McKinley on Annexation (1899). “In Support of an American Empire” (1900). Selection from the Treaty Debate (1899). Value of Manufactured Exports, 1880-1900. Value of U.S. Exports by Country of Destination, 1880–1900.
5. THE PROBLEM OF HISTORICAL MOTIVATION: THE BUNGALOW AS THE “PROGRESSIVE” HOUSE.
Secondary Source: The Progressive Housewife and the Bungalow (1981). Primary Sources: A Victorian House (1875). A Craftsman Cottage (1909). The Craftsman Contrasts Complexity and Confusion with Cohesion and Harmony (1907). Craftsman Home Interiors (1909). Gustav Stickley on the Craftsman Home (1909). Edward Bok on Simplicity (1900). Cover from The Bungalow Magazine (1909). “Standards of Living in the Home” (1912). The Efficient and Inefficient Homemaker (1920). Domestic Economy (1904). Double Bungalow Plan, Bowen Court. Female Servants by Regions, per 1,000 Families, 1880–1920. Clerical Workers in the United States, by Sex, 1870–1920.
6. IDEOLOGY AND HISTORY: ADVERTISING IN THE 1920''s.
Secondary Source: Advertising the American Dream (1985). Primary Sources: “The Poor Little Bride of 1860” (1920). Listerine Advertisement (1923). Ford Motors Advertisement (1924). Kotex Advertisement (1927). Calvin Coolidge on the Economic Aspects of Advertising (1926). Earnest Elmo Calkins, Business the Civilizer (1926). Walter Dill Scott on Effective Advertisements (1928). Advertising to Women (1928).
7. HISTORY “FROM THE TOP DOWN”: ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, FIRST LADY.
Secondary Source: Eleanor Roosevelt as First Lady (1966). Primary Sources: Transcripts of Eleanor Roosevelt''s Press Conferences (1933–1938). “The Negro and Social Change” (1936). Letter to Her Daughter (1937). This I Remember (1949). My Parents: A Differing View (1976). Letter from Barry Bingham to Marvin McIntyre (1934). Excerpts from Letters to Franklin Roosevelt (1935). It''s Up to the Women (1933). Eleanor Roosevelt on the Equal Rights Amendment (1933).
8. HISTORY “FROM THE BOTTOM UP”: THE DETROIT RACE RIOT AND LOS ANGELES ZOOT SUIT RIOTS OF 1943.
Secondary Source: The Detroit Rioters of 1943 (1991). Primary Sources: A Handbill for White Resistance (1942). Black Employment in Selected Detroit Companies, 1941. Black Workers Protest Against Chrysler (1943). A Complaint About the Police (1939). Changes in White and Black Death Rates, 1910-1940. An Explanation for Mexican Crime (1942). “Zoot Suiters Learn Lesson in Fights with Servicemen” (1943). Testimony of Zoot Suiters (1943, 2000). Views of the News (1943). A Governor''s Citizen''s Committee Report on Los Angeles Riots (1943).
9 POPULAR CULTURE AS HISTORY: THE COLD WAR COMES HOME.
Secondary Source: The Culture of the Cold War (1991). Primary Sources: Advertisement for I Married a Communist (1953). Promotional Material for Walk East on Beacon (1952). A Game Show Producer Remembers the Red Scare (1995). A Playwright Recalls the Red Scare (1995). “This Land Is Your Land” (1951). A Folk Singer Remembers the Early Fifties (1995). Pogo (1952). On the Road (1957).
10. HISTORY AND POPULAR MEMORY: THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT.
Secondary Source: I''ve Got the Light of Freedom (1995). Primary Sources: A SNCC Founder Discusses Its Goals (1966). Anzie Moore: Farewell to the “N-Double-A” (ca. 1975). Chronology of Violence, 1961 (1963). A Sharecropper''s Daughter Responds to the Voter Registration Campaign (ca. 1975). A Black Activist Endorses White Participation (ca. 1975). A SNCC Organizer Recalls Federal Intervention (ca. 1975). “A Letter from a Freedom Summer Volunteer” (1964). Examples of Freedom School Student Work (1964). An “Insider” Recalls the Divisions in SNCC (1966). Fannie Lou Hamer on the Lessons of 1964 (1967). “What We Want” (1966).
11. CAUSATION AND THE LESSONS OF HISTORY: EXPLAINING AMERICA''S LONGEST WAR.
Secondary Sources: Fighting in “Cold Blood”: LBJ''s Conduct of Limited War in Vietnam (1994). God''s Country and American Know-How (1986). Primary Sources: LBJ Expresses Doubts about Vietnam (1965). LBJ Recalls His Decision to Escalate (1971). The Central Intelligence Agency Reports on the War (1967). McNamara Recalls the Decision to Escalate (1995). Fighting a Technological War of Attrition (1977). A Medical Corpsman Recalls the Vietnamese People (1981). A Marine Remembers His Shock (1987). A Foreign Service Officer Acknowledges American Ignorance (1987).
12. GENDER, IDEOLOGY, AND HISTORICAL CHANGE: EXPLAINING THE WOMEN''S MOVEMENT.
Secondary Sources: Cold War Ideology and the Rise of Feminism (1988). Women''s Liberation and Sixties Radicalism (2002). Primary Sources: The Problem That Has No Name (1963). Civil Rights and the Rise of Feminism (1987). NOW''s Statement of Purpose (1966). Redstockings Manifesto (1969). “What''s Wrong with ''Equal Rights'' for Women?” (1972). The Combahee River Statement (1986). On Women and Sex (1972). Our Bodies, Ourselves (1973). The Politics of Housework (ca. 1970). Sex Ratios of High School and College Graduates in the United States, 1940-1990. Women''s Labor Force Participation, by Marital Status, 1940–1990.
13. WHY HISTORICAL INTERPRETATION MATTERS: THE BATTLE OVER IMMIGRATION.
Secondary Sources: Unguarded Gates (2004). Immigrant America (2006). Primary Sources: “Illegal Immigrants: The U.S. May Gain More Than It Loses” (1984). Immigration as a Threat to Social Cohesion (1985). Undocumented Workers as International Workers (1997). “The Secret of Success” (2002). “Low Immigration and Economic Growth” (2007). Two Illegal Immigrants Tell Their Story (1988). A Cambodian Immigrant''s American Dream (1988). A Chinese Immigrant Battles Jessica McClintock (1993). An Illegal Immigrant Contemplates Citizenship (2004).

What's New

  • The chapter on racial and ethnic unrest on the home front during World War II (Ch. 8) has been substantially revised to provide broader historical context by discussing the Los Angeles Zoot Suit Riots alongside the Detroit race riot of 1943. To this end, new source materials and revised coverage have been added throughout the chapter. The chapter's new structure enhances students' analytical skills by asking them to compare the motivations and backgrounds of the two different racial conflicts.
  • New sources have been added to the chapters on the Progressive bungalow craze (Ch. 5) and the Cold War (Ch. 9). Based on feedback from U.S. history instructors, these new sources have been selected to make the chapters more informative and engaging for today's students.

Efficacy and Outcomes

Reviews

“The book exposes students to the skills used by historians for research and develops critical thinking. It fills a unique niche for survey level history courses.”

— Garth Swanson, Genesee Community College

“I have perused and used many different document anthologies. I found Hollitz's work to be particularly engaging.”

— Megan Seaholm, University of Texas at Austin

Meet the Author

Author Bio

John Hollitz

John Hollitz received his Ph.D from the University of Wisconsin in 1981 and has been professor of history at the Community College of Southern Nevada since 1992. Previously, he taught at California State University, Chico. In addition to CONTENDING VOICES, he has also authored a critical thinking reader, THINKING THROUGH THE PAST, 5th Edition (Cengage, 2014). Dr. Hollitz is a dedicated teacher of the U.S. History survey course.