Higher Education

Voices of the American Past, Volume I, 5th Edition

  • Raymond M. Hyser James Madison University
  • J. Chris Arndt James Madison University
  • ISBN-10: 1111341249  |  ISBN-13: 9781111341244
  • 336 Pages
  • Previous Editions: 2008, 2005, 2001
  • © 2012 | Published
  • College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $115.50
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About

Overview

VOICES OF THE AMERICAN PAST is a two-volume reader that presents a variety of diverse perspectives through more than 240 primary sources. Excerpts from speeches, letters, journals, magazine articles, hearings and government documents raise issues from both public and private aspects of American life throughout history. A “Guide to Reading and Interpreting Documents” in the front matter explains how and why historians use primary source evidence, and outlines basic points to help students learn to analyze sources. Brief headnotes set each source into context. “Questions to Consider” precede each document, offering prompts for critical thinking and reflection. The volumes are organized chronologically into 27 chapters, with the Reconstruction chapter overlapping in both volumes.

Features and Benefits

  • A mixture of social and political sources speaks to many aspects of Americans’ lives in the past.
  • A “Guide to Reading and Interpreting Documents” defines “primary sources” and explains how and why historians use written and other evidence to tell the story of the past. It outlines in a clear and practical manner five points to help students learn to analyze sources.
  • Brief chapter introductions set the stage for the documents which are numbered consecutively throughout the two-volume set for ease in assigning and locating specific sources.
  • Document headnotes introduce the “speaker” or author and provide brief notes on context.
  • Between two and four “Questions to Consider” precede each document, focusing students on major points, prompting critical thinking, and encouraging reflection on the significance of individual sources as well as general themes.

Table of Contents

1. DIVERSE BEGINNINGS.
1. The Spanish Letter of Columbus to Luis Sant’ Angel (1493). 2. Images of 16th-Century Native American Life. 3. Powhatan and John Smith (1608). 4. An Indentured Servant Writes Home (1623). 5. Early New York (1626). 6. Jesuit Comparison of French and Native Life (1657–1658). 7. General Considerations for the Plantation in New England (1629). 8. William Bradford on Sickness among the Natives (1633). 9. “Captivity Account” of Mary Rowlandson (1675). 10. The Pueblo Revolt (1680). 11. The Indians and Missions of Florida (1675).
2. EMERGING COLONIAL SOCIETIES.
12. A Treaty between the Five Nations and the New England Colonies (1689). 13. Petition of an Accused Witch (1692). 14. “Pennsylvania, The Poor Man’s Paradise” (1698). 15. Of the Servants and Slaves in Virginia (1705). 16. The Dilemma of New France (1724). 17. New York Slave Conspiracy (1741). 18. Eliza Lucas, A Modern Woman (1741–1742).
3. TOWARD AN AMERICAN IDENTITY.
19. “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” (1741). 20. Chief Canassatego Speaks At the Treaty of Lancaster (1744). 21. Pennsylvania Assembly Comments on German Immigration (1755). 22. The Albany Plan of Union (1754). 23. Edmund Burke on British Motives in the Seven Years’ War (1762). 24. “The Pontiac Manuscript” (1763). 25. “What Is an American?” (1770). 26. Account of the African Slave Trade (1788).
4. COMING OF THE REVOLUTION.
27. John Locke on Political Society and Government (1689). 28. Stamp Act Riots (1765). 29. Images of Colonial Resistance (1760s-1770s). 30. Ann Hulton, Loyalist View of Colonial Unrest (1774). 31. Englishwoman’s Appeal to the People of Great Britain on the Crisis in America (1775). 32. Abigail Smith Adams on the British Occupation of Boston (1775). 33. A Loyalist Perspective on the Coming of the Revolution (1780). 34. Introduction to Common Sense (1776). 35. A Speech against Independence (1776).
5. CREATING THE NEW NATION.
36. German Doctor’s Account of War and Surgery (1777). 37. Articles of Confederation (1777). 38. The Revolution in Indian Country (1779). 39. The Battle of King’s Mountain and Loyalism in the Carolinas (1780). 40. Women’s Contributions to the War Effort (1780). 41. European View of the American Revolution (1778/80, 1783). 42. Failure of the Continental Congress (1786). 43. The Northwest Ordinance (1787). 44. Grievances of the Shays Rebels (1786). 45. Pennsylvania Dissent to the Ratification of the Constitution (1787). 46. Federalist Number 10 (1788).
6. THE LIMITS OF REPUBLICANISM.
47. Cato Petitions for His Freedom (1781). 48. Judith Sargent Murray on the Equality of the Sexes (1790). 49. Alexander Hamilton Speaks in Favor of The National Bank (1791). 50. Opposing Views of the Whiskey Rebellion (1794). 51. George Washington’s “Farewell Address” (1796). 52. Description of a Conversion Experience at Cane Ridge, Kentucky (1801). 53. Marbury v. Madison (1803). 54. Resolutions of the Hartford Convention (1815).
7. THE NEW NATION AND ITS PLACE IN THE WORLD.
55. Military Disaster on the Ohio Frontier (1791). 56. Jefferson’s Instructions to Robert Livingston, Minister to France (1802). 57. Heading West with Lewis and Clark (1804). 58. Jefferson and His Opponents (1800, 1807). 59. Tecumseh on White Encroachment (1810). 60. Margaret Bayard Smith on the Burning of Washington, DC (1814). 61. Tennessee Expansionists on the Adams-Onis Treaty (1819). 62. The Monroe Doctrine (1823).
8. THE RISE OF DEMOCRACY.
63. Fanny Wright on Equality (1830). 64. Daniel Webster’s Second Reply to Robert Y. Hayne (1830). 65. Commentary on Elections in Jacksonian America (1832). 66. The American System (1832). 67. Andrew Jackson’s Bank Veto Message (1832). 68. The Cherokee Phoenix on Georgia Policy toward the Cherokee (1832). 69. South Carolina Nullifies the Tariff (1832). 70. Images of Jacksonian Politics.
9. SOCIETY AND ECONOMY IN THE NORTH.
71. Promoting the Erie Canal (1818). 72. Differing Views of a Changing Society (1827, 1836). 73. Charles G. Finney Describes the Rochester Revival (1830–1831). 74. American Mania for Railroads (1834). 75. “Americans on the Move” (1835). 76. Petition to Integrate the Schools (1842). 77. Women Workers Protest “Lowell Wage Slavery” (1847). 78. “On Irish Emigration” (1852).
10. SOCIAL REFORM.
79. “Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World” (1829). 80. William Lloyd Garrison on Slavery (1831). 81. Evidence against the Views of the Abolitionists (1833). 82. Sarah Grimké Argues for Gender Equality (1837). 83. The Temperance Crusade (1818, 1846). 84. “Declaration of Sentiments,” Seneca Falls Convention (1848).
11. MANIFEST DESTINY.
85. Mid-Nineteenth-Century Images of Race and Nation. 86. Texas and California Annexation (1845). 87. American Description of Mexican Women in Santa Fe (1845). 88. Life on the Overland Trail (1846). 89. Mexican View of U.S. Occupation (1847). 90. Mormons Describe Entering the Salt Lake Valley (1848). 91. Local Reaction to the Gold Rush (1848). 92. Images of Chinese Immigrants (1852, 1860). 93. “Civil Disobedience” (1849). 94. The Question of Cuban Annexation (1853).
12. SLAVERY AND THE OLD SOUTH.
95. The Alabama Frontier (1821). 96. The Trial of Denmark Vesey (1822). 97. A Reaction to the Nat Turner Revolt (1831). 98. The Plantation Labor Force (1838–1839). 99. Labor at the Tredegar Iron Works (1847). 100. Martin Delany and African American Nationalism (1852). 101. A Slave Describes Sugar Cultivation (1853). 102. A Defense of Southern Society (1854). 103. Images of Slave Life (1858, 1860). 104. The Southern Yeomen (1860).
13. ORIGINS OF THE CIVIL WAR.
105. An African American Minister Responds to the Fugitive Slave Law (1851). 106. Southern Review of Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852). 107. American (Know Nothing) Party Platform (1856). 108. Charles Sumner on “Bleeding Kansas” (1856). 109. Chicago Tribune on the Dred Scott V. Sanford Decision (1857). 110. Sensible Hints to the South (1858). 111. Frederick Douglass on John Brown (1859). 112. Cartoonists Depict the Issues of the Day (1857-1860). 113. Inaugural Address of South Carolina Governor Francis Pickens (1860). 114. Northern Participation in the Slave Trade (1862).
14. THE CIVIL WAR.
115. Mary Boykin Chesnut, The Attack on Fort Sumter (1861). 116. “A War to Preserve the Union” (1861). 117. Jefferson Davis Responds to the Emancipation Proclamation (1862). 118. Images of African Americans in the Civil War (1863, 1864). 119. George Pickett on the “Charge” (1863). 120. New York City Draft Riots (1863). 121. The Southern Home Front (1863). 122. General William T. Sherman on War (1864). 123. Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address (1865).
15. RECONSTRUCTION.
124. A Northern Teacher’s View of the Freedmen (1863-1865). 125. Charleston, South Carolina at the Conclusion of the Civil War (1865). 126. African-Americans Seek Protection (1865). 127. Thaddeus Stevens on Reconstruction and the South (1865). 128. A White Southern Perspective on Reconstruction (1868). 129. African American Suffrage in the South (1867, 1876). 130. An African American Congressman Calls for Civil Rights (1874). 131. The Situation for African Americans in the South (1879).

What's New

  • New documents provide a greater diversity of voices while also offering readable selections that speak to larger issues. These include an indentured servant’s letter describing conditions in seventeenth century Virginia, a contemporary newspaper report on the 1741 New York slave conspiracy, George Washington’s instructions on conducting war against the Iroquois during the American Revolution, an 1840s African American petition to integrate schools in Massachusetts, and the American Party Platform of 1856.
  • More photos and drawings, especially political cartoons, have been added to the traditional written documents. The result is a number of images that provide a unique approach to interpreting and understanding the key issues of U.S. history. These include drawings of Native American life in the late sixteenth century, European views of the American Revolution, and political cartoons about the election of 1860.

Alternate Formats

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  • Volume II, Paperbound Edition

    ISBN-10: 1111341265 | ISBN-13: 9781111341268

    List Price = $153.95  | CengageBrain Price = $153.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $115.50

Supplements

All supplements have been updated in coordination with the main title. Select the main title's "About" tab, then select "What's New" for updates specific to title's edition.

For more information about these supplements, or to obtain them, contact your Learning Consultant.

Instructor Supplements

Voices of the American Past, Volume II  (ISBN-10: 1111341265 | ISBN-13: 9781111341268)

VOICES OF THE AMERICAN PAST is a two-volume reader that presents a variety of diverse perspectives through more than 240 primary sources. Excerpts from speeches, letters, journals, magazine articles, hearings and government documents raise issues from both public and private aspects of American life throughout history. A “Guide to Reading and Interpreting Documents” in the front matter explains how and why historians use primary source evidence, and outlines basic points to help students learn to analyze sources. Brief headnotes set each source into context. “Questions to Consider” precede each document, offering prompts for critical thinking and reflection. The volumes are organized chronologically into 27 chapters, with the Reconstruction chapter overlapping in both volumes.

List Price = $153.95  | CengageBrain Price = $153.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $115.50

The History Handbook  (ISBN-10: 049590676X | ISBN-13: 9780495906766)

In this new edition of THE HISTORY HANDBOOK, success in a history course is within every student’s reach! Carol Berkin (Baruch College, City University of New York) and Betty Anderson (Boston University) have prepared a no-nonsense guide that teaches basic as well as history-specific study skills--how to read primary sources, research historical topics, correctly cite sources, and more. THE HISTORY HANDBOOK also offers tips for Internet research and evaluating online sources.

List Price = $57.95  | CengageBrain Price = $57.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $43.50

Rand McNally Atlas of American History  (ISBN-10: 0618842012 | ISBN-13: 9780618842018)

Featuring more than eighty maps, this comprehensive atlas also covers global perspectives.

List Price = $62.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $47.25

Writing for College History: A Short Handbook  (ISBN-10: 061830603X | ISBN-13: 9780618306039)

Prepared by Robert M. Frakes, Clarion University. This brief handbook for survey courses in American history, Western Civilization/European history, and world civilization guides students through the various types of writing assignments they encounter in a history class. Providing examples of student writing and candid assessments of student work, this text focuses on the rules and conventions of writing for the college history course.

List Price = $36.95  | CengageBrain Price = $36.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $27.75

Student Supplements

Voices of the American Past, Volume II  (ISBN-10: 1111341265 | ISBN-13: 9781111341268)

VOICES OF THE AMERICAN PAST is a two-volume reader that presents a variety of diverse perspectives through more than 240 primary sources. Excerpts from speeches, letters, journals, magazine articles, hearings and government documents raise issues from both public and private aspects of American life throughout history. A “Guide to Reading and Interpreting Documents” in the front matter explains how and why historians use primary source evidence, and outlines basic points to help you learn to analyze sources. Brief headnotes set each source into context. “Questions to Consider” precede each document, offering prompts for critical thinking and reflection. The volumes are organized chronologically into 27 chapters, with the Reconstruction chapter overlapping in both volumes.

List Price = $153.95  | CengageBrain Price = $153.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $115.50

The History Handbook  (ISBN-10: 049590676X | ISBN-13: 9780495906766)

THE HISTORY HANDBOOK, by Carol Berkin (Baruch College, City University of New York) and Betty Anderson (Boston University), is a no-nonsense guide to the skills you need to succeed in a history course. You’ll learn basic as well as history-specific study skills--how to read primary sources, research historical topics, correctly cite sources, and more. THE HISTORY HANDBOOK also offers tips for Internet research and evaluating online sources.

List Price = $57.95  | CengageBrain Price = $57.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $43.50

Rand McNally Atlas of American History  (ISBN-10: 0618842012 | ISBN-13: 9780618842018)

This comprehensive atlas features more than 80 maps, with new content covering global perspectives, including events in the Middle East from 1945 to 2005, as well as population trends in the U.S. and around the World. Additional maps document voyages of discovery; the settling of the colonies; major U.S. military engagements, including the American Revolution and World Wars I and II; and sources of immigration, ethnic populations, and patterns of economic change.

List Price = $62.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $47.25

Writing for College History: A Short Handbook  (ISBN-10: 061830603X | ISBN-13: 9780618306039)

Prepared by Robert M. Frakes, Clarion University. This brief handbook for survey courses in American history, Western Civilization/European history, and world civilization guides students through the various types of writing assignments they encounter in a history class. Providing examples of student writing and candid assessments of student work, this text focuses on the rules and conventions of writing for the college history course.

List Price = $36.95  | CengageBrain Price = $36.95  | College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $27.75

Meet the Author

Author Bio

Raymond M. Hyser

Raymond M. Hyser is a Professor of History at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. His research interests include the study of race and ethnicity in the Gilded Age. He teaches courses in U.S. History, U.S. Business History, Gilded Age America, and Historical Methods.

J. Chris Arndt

J. Chris Arndt is a Professor of History at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. His research interests include the study of states' rights and economic change in antebellum America. He teaches courses in U.S. History, the American Revolution, the Early Republic, and Historical Methods.