Higher Education

Laboratory Inquiry in Chemistry, 3rd Edition

  • Richard Bauer Arizona State University
  • James Birk Arizona State University
  • Doug Sawyer Scottsdale Community College
  • ISBN-10: 049511345X  |  ISBN-13: 9780495113454
  • 288 Pages
  • Previous Editions: 2005, 2001
  • © 2009 | Published
  • College Bookstore Wholesale Price = $82.50
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About

Overview

LABORATORY INQUIRY IN CHEMISTRY, Thrid Edition provides a unique set of guided-inquiry investigations that focus on constructing knowledge about the conceptual basis of laboratory techniques, instead of simply learning techniques. By focusing on developing skills for designing experiments, solving problems, thinking critically, and selecting and applying appropriate techniques, the authors expose students to a realistic laboratory experience, typical of the practicing chemist. This new edition continues the proven three-phase learning cycle: exploration of chemical behaviors within the context of the problems posed; concept invention--the use of data and observations to construct accepted scientific knowledge about the concepts explored in the laboratory investigation; and, concept application--where students apply their conceptual understanding of the investigation at hand by modifying or extending the experiments, and write a report that emphasizes conceptual relevance. These college and honors level inquiry-based experiments correlate well with the recommended experiments outlined by the Advanced Placement Chemistry Development Committee.

Features and Benefits

  • The following new experiments have been added to this editon:5. What Relationships Exist Among Elements?11. How Much Acetic Acid Is in Vinegar?24. Why Do Liquids Evaporate at Different Rates?In addition, new photos have been added throughout to better demonstrate lab instruments, procedures and techniques.

Table of Contents

The Investigations.
1. What Are the Safety Concerns in the Laboratory?
2. What’s in the Flask?
3. How Should Data Trends Be Presented?
4. How Is Lab Equipment Used?
5. What Relationships Exist Among Elements?
6. What’s in the Bottles?
7. How Can the Waste Be Made Useful?
8. Is the Water Hard or Soft?
9. How Hot Is the Water?
10. Which Metal Will Burn the Skin?
11. How Much Acetic Acid Is in Vinegar?
12. Are All Neutralization Reactions the Same?
13.How Many Waters of Hydration Are in the Formula?
14.How Much Sodium Bicarbonate Is in the Mixture?
15.Is It Economical to Recycle Aluminum?
16.What Is a Copper Cycle?
17.Who Wrote the Ransom Note?
18.How Can UV Sensitive Beads Be Used to Test Sunscreens?
19.What Factors Affect the Intensity of Color?
20.How Much Cobalt Is in the Soil?
21.How Much Copper Is in the Coin?
22.Which Iron Compound Is It?
23.Should We Mine This Ore?
24.Why Do Liquids Evaporate at Different Rates?
25.What Are the Structures of Some Alloys?
26.How Is LED Light Color Related to Composition?
27.What Is the Molar Mass of Mars Ice Gas?
28.How Much Gas Is Produced?
29.Which Alcohols Are in the Barrels?
30.How Is Heat of Combustion Measured Indirectly?
31.What Is the Rate Law?
32.How Fast Does the Crystal Violet Decolorize?
33.Why Is the Vinegar Factory Rusting?
34.What Factors Affect the Solubility of Kidney Stones?
35.How Many Chemicals Are in the Vial?
36.What Factors Affect Chemical Equilibrium?
37.What Is the Formation Constant?
38.Are Household Items Acidic, Basic, or Neutral?
39.What Is the pH of Soil?
40.What Is the Acid Dissociation Constant?
41.What Is the Solubility Product?
42. What Are Some Chemical Properties of Cream of Tartar?
43. What Are the Metals?
44. How Can a Battery Be Made from Coins?
45. What Is the Complex Ion?
46. What Formulation Makes the Best Toy?
47. How Are Anions Identified?
48. How Are Cations Identified?
49. How Are More Cations Identified?
50. How Are Ionic Solids Identified?
Appendix A: Automated Data Collection.
Appendix B: Transmittance and Absorbance Data Collection.
Appendix C: Measuring pH.
Appendix D: Temperature Data Collection.
Appendix E: Pressure Data Collection.
Appendix F: Voltage Data Collection.
Appendix G: Selected Laboratory Techniques.
Appendix H: Laboratory Equipment.
Appendix I: Sample Material Safety Data Sheet.
Appendix J: Tables

What's New

  • Proven three-phase learning cycle: exploration of chemical behaviors within the context of the problems posed; concept invention--the use of data and observations to construct accepted scientific knowledge about the concepts explored in the laboratory investigation; and concept application--where students apply their conceptual understanding of the investigation at hand by modifying or extending the experiments, and write a report that emphasizes conceptual relevance.

Supplements

All supplements have been updated in coordination with the main title. Select the main title's "About" tab, then select "What's New" for updates specific to title's edition.

For more information about these supplements, or to obtain them, contact your Learning Consultant.

Instructor Supplements

Instructor's Manual  (ISBN-10: 0495113468 | ISBN-13: 9780495113461)

Available for download from the Instructor Companion Site. The Instructor's Manual contains models for assessment, suggested prompts for discussion throughout each investigation, TA training material, and more.

Meet the Author

Author Bio

Richard Bauer

Richard Bauer received his undergraduate degree from Saginaw Valley State University and his doctorate from Purdue University. He now coordinates the general chemistry program at Arizona State University. His scholarly interests in chemical education include laboratory instruction, TA training, and alternative modes of lecture instruction.

James Birk

James Birk received his undergraduate degree from St. John's University and his doctorate from Iowa State University. His specializations are inorganic chemistry, chemical education, and computer education. He has been a professor for thirty-five years and is tenured at Arizona State University. Birk is the author of several papers appearing in the "Journal of Chemical Education" as well as twenty-seven books and monographs.

Doug Sawyer

Doug Sawyer received his undergraduate degree from Coe College and his doctorate from Iowa State University. He now teaches at Scottsdale Community College, where he is the chair of the Physical Sciences department. He serves as the American Chemical Society councilor for Central Arizona and is also a chemical consultant for several companies. His work also includes photography for chemistry texts at Houghton Mifflin. In his spare time, he plays bass for the Lynwood Flyers, a local blues band.